September is National Preparedness Month

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UPMan

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In support of National Preparedness Month, we're making it a bit easier to add a scanner to your go-bag. In addition to Water (#1 most important resource in the event of an area-wide emergency), Food, NOAA Weather Radio, cash, first aid supplies, personal medical supplies, personal hygiene supplies, extra batteries, we recommend a few other items:

  • 2-Way Radios so that you can keep in touch with family members and neighbors if the mobile network goes down.
  • Power inverter so you can use your vehicle to power and charge small devices such as radios, mobile phones, and AA batteries.
  • Scanners so that you can be aware of how local emergency responders are dealing with the crisis.
We've cut our prices to distributors for the month of September and asked them to roll out the savings to you. Check out Basic Disaster Supplies Kit | Ready.gov for tips for making your emergency kit, then check out Uniden Scanners, Scanner Software & Accessories to find the scanner that is right for you. Click the "Find a Deal, Now" button for a list of dealers submitted by our master distributors as being the best places to shop.
 

ofd8001

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Been checking some of the vendors - I might be tempted to get a 436 if the price is good. It doesn't look like they have updated their web pages yet as the prices seem to be what they've been all along..
 

fxdscon

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Been checking some of the vendors - I might be tempted to get a 436 if the price is good. It doesn't look like they have updated their web pages yet as the prices seem to be what they've been all along..
Yes, I noticed that also, no change in pricing at all.

I guess the vendors weren't "prepared".

.
 

kayn1n32008

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  • Power inverter so you can use your vehicle to power and charge small devices such as radios, mobile phones, and AA batteries.

All great advice Upman, but I must disagree with this one point.

Inverters are horribly inefficient, rather than an inverter, folks should try and keep all mobile device chargers that operate on 12V. I even have a 12v power supply for my laptop.

This comes from years of experience working out of a truck in the northern Alberta oil patch. All my radio chargers, laptop, iPad, cellphone and scanner can operate directly from, and charge from 12v.

There are 12v adapter/supplies out there that will provide variable 5-20-ish volts at upwards of 4.5A

I used to use an inverter, but due to the RFI and the inefficiency of them, I no longer do. I have a Li-Ion charger for one of the instruments I use at work that will not charge the equipment if used with an inverter. I suspect it was due to not being a pure sine inverter.


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ofd8001

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Once again I looked at the various vendors Uniden has on their site. It doesn't appear that any of them have dropped prices on the 436.

Does anyone have additional information on this? Perhaps the new models have been excluded from the price drop.
 

AC2OY

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I have a battery operated scanner,car chargers for my cellphones,tons of flashlights,LED lamps....need to buy a generator though I look at them at home depo but have no idea what will suit my needs.
 

iMONITOR

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I have a battery operated scanner,car chargers for my cellphones,tons of flashlights,LED lamps....need to buy a generator though I look at them at home depo but have no idea what will suit my needs.
Most homes can maintain necessities with about 5000/5500 watts. This does not include air conditioning however. I used a Troy Bilt 5500w for several years, powering lights, TV, computers, sump pump, refrigerator, furnace, etc.

Last year I upgraded to a Champion 7000 watt, due to buying a very large refrigerator, and small chest freezer.

I did away with all incandescent light bulbs, to lower the burden on the generator. Initially I had changed over to CFLs, but recently changed them all over to CREE LED bulbs.
 

jonwienke

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Most homes can maintain necessities with about 5000/5500 watts.
You don't need much to run run the whole house, if you exclude electric heaters, electric water heater, and whole-house air conditioner. 4000-5000 watts is generally plenty to run refrigerator, lights, computers, phones, and other miscellaneous stuff, and control a gas or propane furnace.
 

iMONITOR

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You don't need much to run run the whole house, if you exclude electric heaters, electric water heater, and whole-house air conditioner. 4000-5000 watts is generally plenty to run refrigerator, lights, computers, phones, and other miscellaneous stuff, and control a gas or propane furnace.
With things like sump pump motors, you need to oversize to some extent to handle the inrush current, when the motor starts. Also a generator larger than required, doesn't have to work as hard to keep up with demand. Your engine will last longer, and probably run cooler, and quieter.
There's not a big cost difference.
 

ofd8001

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Being the safety zealot that I am, its good to mention generator location. When running, these things produce carbon monoxide. Far too often, people using generators during power outages leave them running in closed garages or other enclosed spaces. They are afraid that their generator will be stolen if left outside. Tragic results then happen.

It is a good idea to get a qualified electrician involved if the generator is going to be tied into the home's electrical circuits.

A lot of good safety stuff on generators can be found below:

How to Use a Generator Safely | Generator Safety Tips | Red Cross
 

Thayne

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You don't need much to run run the whole house, if you exclude electric heaters, electric water heater, and whole-house air conditioner. 4000-5000 watts is generally plenty to run refrigerator, lights, computers, phones, and other miscellaneous stuff, and control a gas or propane furnace.
I set my 12KVA Genset up with a remote stop switch because I know when it starts up the zombies might "come a runnin" to get warm or rape & pillage-- Also have good sightlines thru 2 sides to get em in a crossfire without blowing a hole in the genset--

Whaddaya think?
 

bobmich52

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You don't need much to run run the whole house, if you exclude electric heaters, electric water heater, and whole-house air conditioner. 4000-5000 watts is generally plenty to run refrigerator, lights, computers, phones, and other miscellaneous stuff, and control a gas or propane furnace.
Up here in the State of CT

I Use to have a Troy Built 6,500 watts/8,250 watt surge, A great little generator, But trying to find gas became a Pain in the Six when there was a extended power outage


I would generally agree with the 4,000/5,000 watts Except I never would run my computer on it because of the possible voltage spikes, Some portables say they Have voltage regulators on them, But I wouldn't trust it still

I recently had a Sewer Grinder Pump installed (6,500 watts) with a 220 volt connection, That would sink most portable generators, So I had a GE 13k Whole house Standby Generator installed with a 100 gallon lpg tank That would Run my house with power 2 spare, Fuel usage Running the basics is about 1 gal a hr. give or take a little, 1.5 gals a hour @ 1/2 load

By code, It is 5 ft. away from my house & Some folks think it's a Central Air Unit !!

I Would have No problem @ all running any of My Electronics Computer/TV's Etc on it

Of Course it Does Help to have the basic Scanner necessities to stay informed, HP 1 (2) & a 396t & a 436 for portable use
 

iMONITOR

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I would generally agree with the 4,000/5,000 watts Except I never would run my computer on it because of the possible voltage spikes, Some portables say they Have voltage regulators on them, But I wouldn't trust it still
My generator does have a voltage regulator on it. My computer/radio room is protected by a APC SmartUPS 1400VA, that has surge protection, voltage regulation, and EMF noise filtering. So I think my equipment is well protected.

Slightly oversizing the generator helps in preventing surges as well, when large loads turn on, and off.
 

JamesO

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I have a 12 kW Natural Gas generator connected that runs almost the entire house. All but the electric dryer, wall oven, main cooktop unit and upstairs heat pump. I have gas hot water and heat for the main level as well as the main level AC on the unit.

Fortunately or unfortunately I have about 150 hours of run time on the unit in the last 4 years, this is with me turning it off for some extended periods during outages.

I got a STEAL on this unit with the transfer switch for like $1900 new. I asked the wife for permission, she said NO. When I went to pick up my buddies, I said toss another one on the truck. Sat at the house for about 4 months before we had a 50+ hour outage in the peak of the Summer. I had the natural gas regulator but needed a battery and had to connect the gas line. Well after about 10 hours I said, this thing has to be hooked up.

Once it was started up and running, I just asked for forgiveness, I think I was granted a pass???

Now when the power goes out the wife counts to 20 and waits for the generator to start.

Even with what I have to pay for fuel, it is cheaper than a hotel and loss of food.

She probably would not want to be without a generator after living with one.

We do not miss a beat now, Internet, Phone, TV, AC, Heat, Hot Water, Microwave, Hairdryer etc.
 

iMONITOR

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Those are nice! If I had it to do all over again, I would have gone that route. We didn't think we were going to stay at this house for than a few years, but here we are, 14 years later!
 

ofd8001

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Chiming in with another thought - this coming from 39 years in the fire service with about half of that being in fire inspections.

Once generators have been properly located and installed, the biggest point of failure comes as a result of not exercising generators. They should be started periodically and run for about 20-30 minutes. It's also best for some of these "exercise runs" to be under load so all of the components are being used. This might indentify issues before there is a power failure.

Stale gasoline for gasoline generators can be an issue. Toward the end of grass cutting season, I suggest folks remove the gas from the generator and use it in mowers. Then refill the generator with the gas in cans for the mowers. In the spring repeat the process. That way you'll have gas in generators no more than 6 months old.

A natural gas generator is really the very best way to go - the ultimate type can use other fuel types (kerosene/diesel/gasoline) just in case, though that's rarely found in residential use.
 

RoninJoliet

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Natural Gas "Generac" 17k = No worries= $5600 installed , because im tired of "ComEd keeping me in the DARK......
 

bobmich52

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Chiming in with another thought - this coming from 39 years in the fire service with about half of that being in fire inspections.

Once generators have been properly located and installed, the biggest point of failure comes as a result of not exercising generators. They should be started periodically and run for about 20-30 minutes. It's also best for some of these "exercise runs" to be under load so all of the components are being used. This might indentify issues before there is a power failure.

Stale gasoline for gasoline generators can be an issue. Toward the end of grass cutting season, I suggest folks remove the gas from the generator and use it in mowers. Then refill the generator with the gas in cans for the mowers. In the spring repeat the process. That way you'll have gas in generators no more than 6 months old.

A natural gas generator is really the very best way to go - the ultimate type can use other fuel types (kerosene/diesel/gasoline) just in case, though that's rarely found in residential use.

Very good point ofd 8001

My generator Has load shed & exercises 4 20 mins a week, can not get around it & its a good thing is right!

My suggestion would be is to set the exercise time 4 when you Know u will be home, So you can check & see/watch the The operations code panel & deal with any issues

If you have the info hub option. That negates the above, But if you don't have that option, Its a smart & simple way 2 go
 
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