set screw connectors

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reconrider8

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What are the pros/con's of setscrew connectors? I had to replace a connector on an old mount I had yesterday and I said I may as well try it at least for a temp setup to see how it was and so far its working nice but I wanted others opinions on them also
 

jim202

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What are the pros/con's of setscrew connectors? I had to replace a connector on an old mount I had yesterday and I said I may as well try it at least for a temp setup to see how it was and so far its working nice but I wanted others opinions on them also
How about just a little bit of a hint about what your talking about. Like what is this connector? What is it used for? Where is it used? What does it look like? What does the set screw do? Where can we find a picture of this connector?

You have not given the group much to go on. You might be trying to describe something on a saddle that you use on an "old mount" you call a horse.
 

jonwienke

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Solder > screw connectors.

A setscrew setup like that will also mess up the impedance when you tighten the screw which is going to increase SWR/insertion loss. The screw is making a dimple in the insulation between center conductor and shield, and the spacing between center and shield is what determines impedance.
 

reconrider8

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i may end up trying another crimp on but ive never had good luck with them i strip it back get it all set and crimp and somehow it doesnt work or it comes right back off with a little test tug
 
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I had a set screw on a VHF radio for awhile. The screw gets loose over time and disengaged from the shield causing extremely weird swr readings. I'd crimp...only solder when I have no other choice (soldered connections will fail over time in a mobile or high vibration environment).
 

KC8ESL

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Recon -

It sounds to me like you don't have your crimp tool set up correctly if your tug test lets the connector fall right off.

A good rule of thumb conveyed to me from someone in the cable making industry is that a crimped connector should withstand at least 10Kg of force (think of a cable hanging in the air and something that weighs slightly more than a bowling ball hanging from it). I've got some RG6 BNC's from Neutrik (NBNC75BTU11) that are so good that the braiding in the coax fails before the crimp does. I wish they would do any 50ohm cable version.

Check out this tool from l-com. It has an adjustable tensioner which allows you some flexibility in how tight your center pins(if not soldered) and ferrules are crimped.
Coaxial Crimp Tool Sizes .100"-.429" - HT-CRIMP03

Paladin, Eclipse, Klein, l-com, Ideal, Comprehensive Video Group, all good tools. I'm sure there are many others but those are the ones I have personal experience with.
 

KC8ESL

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Agreed 100% with zz. You'll need to find a pair of rails with the correct die set for your specific connectors. Not all connectors are created equally in size, though they may work on the same brand of wire.
 
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