Short/stubby HT Antenna.

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Carpe_PM

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New to the hobby, have my GMRS license and will have my technician at the end of the month. Question regarding the short or "stubby" antennas (antennae?). I understand that the stubby style antennas reduce performance, however, I've read several postings stating operators are able to hit repeaters up to 10 miles away with these things. If I'm actually looking to decrease my transmit range, will antennas like the NAGOYA NA-805 or similar do that or, should I just stick with the rubber duckies that come with the HTs? I'm trying to keep the communications of our small group local.
 

robertmac

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So are you talking about small group local as in GMRS or Ham radio. Regardless, it probably doesn't matter. Turn the power down. Don't forget most things are line of sight.
 

vagrant

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Why spend money on new antennas if you want to reduce transmit range? Just reduce the transmit power and use the stock antenna.

That being said, I use Diamond SRHF10 antennas on a Yaesu VX-3R and a Kenwood TH-F6A. I can hit a VHF repeater that is about 35 miles away and 1500 feet above my elevation. With the VX-3R I need to be outdoors and cannot be directly next to a building in order to do that, as it only transmits 1.5 watts max with just the battery. Considering the size, this antenna works well on those radios for my needs.
 

AgentCOPP1

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10 miles with a rubber duck isn't unheard of, but certainly it depends mostly on how much "stuff" is in between the radio and the repeater (ie hills, foliage, buildings). Those mini antennas really are just dummy loads that happen to leak out a bit of RF, so even though you want your group to be local, you might want to think twice about it. I've never used one of them but the stock antenna should work fine. Like others said, just turn the power down. Keep in mind, they call them "rubber ducks" for a reason, because they perform just a little bit better than a rubber duck attached to your radio would.
 

KE5MC

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While turning down the power is a good choice as your battery will last longer and you save some $$ using what came with the radio. The stubby antenna does keep the antenna from poking you in the ribs when clipped to your belt. It seems like a stock antenna is always in the way. :D
Mike

Thanks all, I'll go the "turn the power down" route. 73
 
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