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Should I get a business band license?

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KC9VZV

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Hi,

Because I am so interested in radio communications, my dad recently asked me to research what would be the easiest way for his small business to legally obtain and operate on 5-10 handheld radios. After some research, I am not sure that getting a business band license would be the best option because these radios would only be used 3 or 4 times a year in a very close vicinity to each other. My next thought was that I could get a few inexpensive radios and have them programmed for MURS, which is virtually never used in this area.
Basically, I want some advice on what the easiest and most inexpensive way to get and operate on 5-10 handheld radios would be. Also, please keep in mind that these radios would only be used a few times every year.

Thanks!
 

krokus

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Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry8530/5.0.0.973 Profile/MIDP-2.1 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/105)

How are the radios going to be used? What distances are needing to be covered?
 

K9WG

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If you are going to be using them close range then MURS hand helds would be the best. I believe (someone correct me if I am wrong) that the radios have to be certified for MURS and not just part 90 radios programmed to MURS frequencies.
 

K9WG

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OK - Fount the official word on equipment:

FCC: Wireless Services: Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS): Operations: Technical Requirements

EquipmentEach Multi-Use Radio Service transmitter (a transmitter that operates or is intended to operate in the MURS) must be certificated in accordance with Part 95, Subpart J of the Commission’s rules. Those radio units certificated as of November 12, 2002 need not be recertificated. No MURS unit, under any condition of modulation, shall exceed 2 Watts transmitter power output.
..
EmissionsA MURS transmitter must transmit only emission types A1D, A2B, A2D, A3E, F2B, F1D, F2D, F3E, G3E. Emission types A3E, F3E and G3E include selective calling or tone-operated squelch tones to establish or continue voice communications. MURS transmitters are prohibited from transmitting in the continuous carrier mode. The authorized bandwidth for any emission type transmitted by a MURS transmitter is specified as follows:
ALL A3E emissions are limited to 8 kHz.
Emissions other than A3E on frequencies 151.820 MHz, 151.880 MHz, and 151.940 MHz are limited to 11.25 kHz.
Emissions other than A3E on frequencies 154.570 and 154.600 MHz are limited to 20.0 kHz.
MURS transmitters shall be designed to comply with the emission masks described in 47 CFR 95.635.
Hope this helps
 

KC9VZV

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Wow! You guys are great...Very helpful! In answer to the one question, they will be used for a retail store to communicate between employees inside the store and/or outside. The range required should not exceed a quarter of a mile, but the walls inside the store are pretty thick (sometimes it is hard to get a cell phone signal), if that changes anything.
From what I see here, though, I think MURS would be the best option. How do I know if a radio is MURS certified?
Thanks again!
 

N4DES

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Why don't you look to lease them for the few times that you need them. In the Yellow Pages there are plenty of companies that will do this and you will operate under their license for the occassional use.
 

KC9VZV

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Why don't you look to lease them for the few times that you need them. In the Yellow Pages there are plenty of companies that will do this and you will operate under their license for the occassional use.
Thanks for the idea. That could work, except there are times that the radios would be used that we would need to use them on very short notice and maybe for just a few minutes at a time. Otherwise, that would work. I hadn't thought of that, though.
 

KC9VZV

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Okay, thanks. I had not realized that a MURS radio had to be certified by the FCC. With that in mind, I am kind of limited on what radios I can buy. If I get a business band license, (correct me if I am wrong) I can use any radio with that license as long as it does not exceed the power limit, follows all other rules, etc. Even if there is a limit on which radios I can use with the business band license, it looks to me like I can get a better price on multiple radio on eBay. I can't seem to find a good price on multiple MURS radios on eBay. Any thoughts?
 

jim202

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make sure what ever type of radios you buy they need to be able to do NarrowBand.

Now that is a rather abrupt statement to make when you don't know what band or class of service they will be used in. If they fall under part 90, which covers the public service and business services, then yes if they will be in the VHF or UHF band. If the radios will be used in another class of service or in the 800 band, your comment may be some what premature.
 

62Truck

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Okay, thanks. I had not realized that a MURS radio had to be certified by the FCC. With that in mind, I am kind of limited on what radios I can buy. If I get a business band license, (correct me if I am wrong) I can use any radio with that license as long as it does not exceed the power limit, follows all other rules, etc. Even if there is a limit on which radios I can use with the business band license, it looks to me like I can get a better price on multiple radio on eBay. I can't seem to find a good price on multiple MURS radios on eBay. Any thoughts?
If you apply for a Business Band license then you will have to make sure the radios will do narrowband and yes you can use any part 90 accepted radio with that license you would just have to make sure the radio are set to the right power level for the lower that is permitted on the license
 

KC9VZV

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If you apply for a Business Band license then you will have to make sure the radios will do narrowband and yes you can use any part 90 accepted radio with that license you would just have to make sure the radio are set to the right power level for the lower that is permitted on the license
When you say that the radios have to be narrowband, are you saying that because of how all frequencies have to switch to narrowband by 2013 (I think that's the date) or is there another reason?
 

62Truck

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When you say that the radios have to be narrowband, are you saying that because of how all frequencies have to switch to narrowband by 2013 (I think that's the date) or is there another reason?
Yes correct all part 90 licenses that are in the VHF and UHF range
 

KE4NYV

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You might try a set of FRS and see if they give you the range needed.
+1

Start with the most simple, lowest price solution and then work up from there if that doesn't work. You get away from all of the licensing and part 90 issues with buying stuff off of eBay, "making stuff work", ect. Besides, if you really do have issues with thick walls, the FRS UHF will give you better building penetration vs. the MURS VHF. However, if the users are close enough geographically, it might not matter.
 
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For the type of coverage you are looking for, You can check out the Motorola XTN series radios. They are UHF and VHF both. Most close distance communications can be taken care of with these cheaper model radios often not requiring a license. They also offer the abilities to set PL/DPL tones so that you are not hearing anyone else. UHF seems to penetrate concrete walls better than VHF. Most of the Wal-Marts use the XTN VHF radios on ether 154.570/154.600 UHF would probably be your best bet. They are better radios than your plan everyday cheap FRS radios.
 

KC9VZV

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For the type of coverage you are looking for, You can check out the Motorola XTN series radios. They are UHF and VHF both. Most close distance communications can be taken care of with these cheaper model radios often not requiring a license. They also offer the abilities to set PL/DPL tones so that you are not hearing anyone else. UHF seems to penetrate concrete walls better than VHF. Most of the Wal-Marts use the XTN VHF radios on ether 154.570/154.600 UHF would probably be your best bet. They are better radios than your plan everyday cheap FRS radios.
Sounds like a perfect plan, but those frequencies you gave (154.570/154.600) that WalMart usually uses, can I legally operate on those without consulting the FCC or getting some kind of license? If yes, can you get me a link to the FCC webpage that explains about that? Thanks!
 
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