Simple Passwords Remain Popular

Status
Not open for further replies.

mikepdx

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
818
Location
Corbett, OR USA
If Your Password Is 123456, Just Make It HackMe

Back at the dawn of the Web, the most popular account password was “12345.”
Today, it’s one digit longer but hardly safer: “123456.”

Despite all the reports of Internet security breaches over the years, including the recent attacks
on Google’s e-mail service, many people have reacted to the break-ins with a shrug.

According to a new analysis, one out of five Web users still decides to leave the digital equivalent of a
key under the doormat: they choose a simple, easily guessed password like “abc123,” “iloveyou”
or even “password” to protect their data.

Simple Passwords Remain Popular, Despite Risk of Hacking - NYTimes.com
 

SCPD

QRT
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
65,126
Location
Virginia
Passwords are the weak point of network systems, that much is true. Many folks use incremental passwords such as password1 then when it expires use password2 and so on...

The best passwords are non-words, consisting of random letters, text and punctuation marks, consisting of at least 8 characters in length.

I sat down at my bro's machine one day, on a challenge from him to hack into his account. Since I know a lot about him I was able to hack in within 5 minutes. His password then? 81HDFLH. Yup, he listed his make and model of his Harley-Davidson. He was totally blown away that I was in.
 

bezking

Member
Database Admin
Joined
Aug 5, 2006
Messages
2,634
Location
On the Road
Passwords are the weak point of network systems, that much is true. Many folks use incremental passwords such as password1 then when it expires use password2 and so on...
One of my network administrators at work once did the same thing (with his domain admin account that got him access to *everything* on our network)... I nearly fired him on the spot when I found out. :evil:
 
N

N_Jay

Guest
Seems that once you find the equipment it would be simple to know if any existed.

Looks more like fearmongering than any real problem.

Probably pushed by a Cisco lobbyist to help keep their insane markups and margins.
 

K4IHS

Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2002
Messages
688
Location
Charlotte, NC
I service a lot of computers. I've found on more then one occasion where people use qwerty. I never got it until I looked down at the keyboard to enter it! :)
 

mike_s104

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Aug 25, 2004
Messages
4,677
Location
Berkeley Co. WV/ Loudoun Co. VA
You should hear people when they are told "you need to change your password to some new that you have never used before, cannot contain any part of your name or username, and must contain 3 of the 4 of the following: upper case, lower case, number and/or special character/symbol."

"OH MY GOD, how do you expect anyone to remember that? When did this start? I used "Bobbyjoe123!" last time, can I use it again? " The people that give you that answer have their password under their mouse pad (for a laser mouse that doesn't need one), under their keyboard or plastered on their office/cube wall. No matter how secure you make a network, the biggest threat is from your users.
 

iMONITOR

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
7,048
Location
MACOMB, MI.
When I worked in IT at SBC a very large percentage of the female employees kept their password on a piece of paper under their keyboard. A few were caught with it on a Post-Note stuck on the front bezel of their monitor! :roll:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top