Status Check

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shajen

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Why do the police dispatchers now want to confirm the status check of there officers? I don't believe
I had heard this until a couple of months ago. It seems that every hour or so they want to confirm the status check of 3 or 4 officers.
 

troymail

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It seems like a good idea to periodically check on officers that are on duty - particularly if they are on routine patrols or on an actual incident - for their safety (and perhaps for other reasons).

I routinely hear different police departments call their officers who are on an active call but haven't been heard in a while with an "Ocean King?" or "Signal 50?" just to ensure they are ok.

There is a state agency here in Maryland that does routine "roll calls" of officers during their shifts.
 

Ed6698

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I hear status checks everyday, seems more now then in the past since the county I live in consolidated to a central dispatch center that has I believe more then 20 PD/FD agencies to keep track of. I also hear the roll call with Indiana State PD during their shifts.

I just realized this is a Delaware forum, oh well, saw it on the Home page for active forum threads and responded. But to get back on topic, keeping track of officers is being done more nationwide I believe.
 
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dpcain

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There is also a requirement in a lot of agencies to start doing those if call volume drops below a certain level. The reasoning being that officers aren't on the radio as much when call volume is low, and could be dying of a gunshot wound for an hour before anyone thinks "hey I haven't heard them call up recently, weird".
 

LeSueurC

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Lots of FD's and PD's do that in VA as well. There's a Fire Department that does a benchmark every so often and will remind them if they've been at a certain location for a certain amount of time
 

delaware74b

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I believe the SOP is to check in on Fire/EMS every 20 minutes in Kent County. I do know an accountability check is done every 20 minutes on a working fire scene until situation is placed under control by officer in charge. Kent Center also checks in periodically on fire police that remain on scene after fire/EMS have left the scene until state/local police take over the scene.

Kent Center and Dover Fire also check in on fire marshals that are on scene investigations unless fire marshal/officer in charge request accountability checks not to be done.
 

troymail

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On working fire/ems incidents in my county, dispatchers make announcements every 10 minutes until command advises to cancel the timers.

I'm listening to a very large fire incident in College Park Maryland (just north/outside Washington DC) today and even with constant activity on three different talkgroups, dispatch makes notifications to command at least once an hour and command gives a status update. In this particular case, I believe it's more to allow the dispatch center to plan for actions in the coming hours.
 

TDR-94

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There are also other reasons to do checks.Like trying to make sure officers aren't asleep in their cars, or shopping on duty etc...GPS locating also works well!
 

KK4JUG

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There are also other reasons to do checks.Like trying to make sure officers aren't asleep in their cars, or shopping on duty etc...GPS locating also works well!
Do they sleep?

I remember an old timer telling of how he used to sleep on duty. Back then, the police cars had radios but walkie-talkies didn't exist. For the walking beat downtown, there were call boxes. Officers had to call in every 20 minutes or so. This particular officer didn't smoke but he always carried a pack of Pall Mall cigarettes with him on duty. Between call-ins, he would go to his favorite spot tucked away in an alley. He had a ladder-back chair that served as his "bed." He would light a cigarette, put it between his fingers and wrap a rubber band around his fingers to hold the cigarette in place. Then he would lean the chair back against the wall with his "cigarette arm" hanging down and go to sleep. In about 15 minutes, the cigarette would burn down enough to be uncomfortable and wake him. He would make his way to the call box and check in.

He said he always used Pall Mall because they timed out "just right."
 

Syncopations

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Occasionally, I'll hear the dispatcher call out their the station call sign. When that happens, all officers on duty are required to check in with their badge numbers. Also, after approximately five minutes that the officer did not check in, the dispatcher would do a check on each officer, whether it's a call or a traffic stop
 
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