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Stuck/Tight Ferrite Cores Service Chemical Suggestions

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Dawn

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Apr 5, 2003
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I was wondering if there are any newer approaches to this subject since I used to be do service. Forms have changed in newer sets instead of waxed paper forms or polypropolyne Toko types. Even those had a tendency to stick and for a while the importers were using that shellac-like glip-something that acetone worked for. The waxed sealed ones, scooping out as much as you could followed by a tiny drop of xylol or heating slightly (not together) usually did the trick softening the rest of the wax without any problems to the core or form. For tight cores, a tiny drop of silicone oil using a needle dispenser often did the trick if it wasn't too wedged.

Silicone oil apparently is something that's fallen out of fashion and almost verbotten in industrial settings due to resistant contamination.

Not many real resources left on repair and I'm curious what's used today.

I realize this board has descended into a drive by newB board, but any of you still doing real service? I'm curious what service chemicals have replaced the old. A look at sources reveal all sorts of new products that I'm unfamilliar with and many of the well know, old, effective products for one enviormental or hazmat reason have vanished especially in the last decade or two.

Anyone can give any suggestions
 

Oldme

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Jun 25, 2014
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Hull, Ga,
Interesting question I observed the same in my new 29 today.
What I did, with the set disconnected, was gently get a small tool and worked
around the edge of what looked like a plastic cap.

Then I was able to get the plastic tool to turn both the core and the plastic cap.
The meter showed that it worked.

I bet there is a better way.
 

Oldme

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Hull, Ga,
I ran across this today.
"Ferrite and iron dust cores were often locked with wax, or more recently, a Rocol compound designed for the job. Over the years, both of these harden to the point where the cores will break if adjustment is attempted. A good solution is to apply a little ear wax remover to the core and leave for 5 mins. This works like magic for both wax and the Rocol compound."

Others say a little heat.

I wish someone with more experience would chine in.
This seems so simple and basic, but I do not want anything broken.
Whatever is sealing mine does not look like wax.
 

prcguy

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I worked for Pace Communications in the mid 70s and the factory procedure was to gently heat the top of the the ferrite slug with a soldering iron and go about your tuning. Everything was sealed in a beeswax compound back then and I probably diddled hundreds of radios and don't remember breaking any cores. Its very important to have the correct tuning stick for the slug or you will break something.
prcguy
 

Oldme

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Hull, Ga,
Thanks Prcguy.

I had read before about heat and forgot.
Do you know it that works for the newer sealers too?
I understand that they are called a Rocol compound (?).

As you can see form my post, that although I may be what others refer to as
"Chronologically Challenged", I am still a newbie in many ways.

Thanks again.
 
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