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Suggestions on Radio over IP adapters with 4-Wire Line-Level

freddaniel

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May 6, 2011
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Newport Beach, CA
I know the JPS NXU-2B is the gold standard, with a gold price. However, I am looking for a reasonably priced, simple pair of adapters to connect two radio sites by IP and interface at line levels (-10 dBm) with either E&M or PTT & COR transport. No fancy options, once programmed they just simply turn-on and connect. If the LAN drops out, then they reconnect when the LAN is restored. Back in 1995, I used MultiTech 4-wire E&M hardware with great success. Today, I am using RemoteRig adapters, but they no longer have a USA distributor. What works for you?
 

jeepsandradios

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I have a set of RAD boxes. Never implemented them but they are 4 circuit 4 wire boxes. I used a similar box in the past from RAD. The issue with those is they need to be on a network and don't go on the internet and just attach without other equipment.
 

WB5UOM

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oops..wrong place...I will have to look and try again...
 

WB5UOM

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Yup Easy Link for conv radio
The one I mentioned for say, GeMds or 4RF etc
 
Joined
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This may be what you are looking for, their site is hard to view from all the java script and fancy css coding.
 

mmckenna

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Jul 27, 2005
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I am a lineman for the county.
This may be what you are looking for, their site is hard to view from all the java script and fancy css coding.

The local county guys really like the Raven products. I'm considering them, but in a race between the RFP to replace the system and the local RBOC pulling support for dry circuits.
 

Project25_MASTR

Millennial Graying OBT Guy
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Jun 16, 2013
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Texas
Barix Annuncicom 100 is what I've used in the past that isn't JPS. I also have some Zetron point to point boxes but never used them simply because they are point to point only.

Otherwise...JPS.
 

Firebuff880

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Aug 28, 2006
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657
Location
Boynton Beach, FL
You also might look at the Telex units (IP-223/IP-224) in the same category as the Omnitronices and other gear. But an IP-223 might be found at a "reasonable" price on Ebay or Surplus as they are being replaced with the IP-224 which is easier to configure. However, if you are looking for a fixed solution the IP-223 is a great answer.
 

freddaniel

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May 6, 2011
Messages
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Location
Newport Beach, CA
Thanks for all the suggestions. Most units sell for $1,000 to $2,000 each which I think is unreasonable for basic 4-wire audio over IP with PTT & COR. I believe the high cost of most offerings is driven by extra features not needed for basic transport.

The most impressive I found for basic transport is the Barix Annuncicom 100 {or 200} which includes a serial port for $415 each new. I just purchased two used ones for testing.

I am also looking at the Barix IPAM302 OEM module that has 2 voice channels and 4 IO ports, plus a serial port. I do not have a price yet, but I believe they are around $195 each [in lots of 10] as a bare-bones module. The advantage is two duplex voice channels with signaling & a serial port, but you need to make your own carrier board with user interfaces, lightning protection, 3.3v power regulator and case. The extras are likely $50 each in lots of 10.

If anyone is interested, I will share what I learn.....
 

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Project25_MASTR

Millennial Graying OBT Guy
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Texas
I've got several 100's that I bought used. I actually fed them with a PoE switch that would provide 24V power and split out the two power pairs for power at the box.

I think my chief complaint about them was they weren't as bandwidth efficient as the JPS solution.
 

freddaniel

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May 6, 2011
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Location
Newport Beach, CA
Mr. P25 MASTR is right, the JPS product has a 16K version of ADPCM (G.723) that works very well. About 25 years ago, I designed & built a multi-state MPT1327 trunked system and used the 16K codec to place 3 voice channels and two RS-232 for a data channel on a single 56K DDS telco circuit. It worked very well and could not tell the difference between full-rate G.711 vocoders. However, today bandwidth is more available and even JPS recommends using G.711, if the 64kbs is available per voice channel.

What I have learned about BARIX is encouraging. First, the Annuncicom 100 or 200 are great mature units that use the pictured IPAM 302. However, the IPAM 302 is considered obsolete as it cannot be upgraded, due to design limitations. The last software update occured in 2014 and the product cannot be upgraded to handle IPv6. The board is still available at around $150 in lots of 10.
The really good news is the new BARIX MPI400, which uses the newest IPAM 404 module is the upgrade and operates using LINUX, with tons of memory & user customization. The IPAM 404 is only $120 in lots of 10. The fully assembled MPI400 sells for $475 each, but is mono. The IPAM 404 hardware can support two-channel stereo, but the codec is limited to MP3 at a higher bit rate. Maybe in the future BARIX will make other codecs available using the stereo feature, but for now, it is mono with a wide selection of vocoders.
I have created the attached comparison between the JPS RoIP unit and the Barix MPI400, which does about the same thing. The most obvious difference is the MPI400 can interface at line-level audio OR connect a microphone & speaker, to serve as a RoIP desktop remote. Like the JPS, the unit also includes 2 extra signaling channels and a RS-232 async data port. JPS has a simpler user interface, compared to BARIX, but BARIX will allow the OEM user to change the "skin" of the user interface, to allow private branding.

Until we can build a carrier board, with all the required ESD and lightning protection to support the IPAM 404, we will likely use the fully assembled MPI400 to meet our needs, at about 1/3 of the price of the JPS model.

Just in case someone missed it, there is no difference between VoIP, RoIP and AoIP (Audio over IP), except the user interface and some options. There are tons of choices out there used for elevator intercoms, public address systems, security gate controls, background music distribution, etc. It boggles the mind. I hope this information help you.
 

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Joined
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About 25 years ago, I designed & built a multi-state MPT1327 trunked system and used the 16K codec to place 3 voice channels and two RS-232 for a data channel on a single 56K DDS telco circuit.
Was this for a utility company? I taught a class in CT for a company that was moving from MPT1327 to DMR, had hardly heard of that system until then.
 

freddaniel

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Location
Newport Beach, CA
The system operated on the Automated Maritime Telecommunications System (AMTS) spectrum in the 217-220 MHz range as a common carrier using up to 80 narrow-band channels. The FCC allowed Regionet to service land mobile as well as marine customers.
The business was originally called Regionet. Even though Regionet had licenses in the top 50 markets in the USA, the largest system operated along the entire West Coast, first using a networked version of LTR, then switching to MPT1327 to provide greater functionality. MPT1327 started as an open analog trunking standard in the UK and then became a world standard, except in the USA. Equipment was manufactured by Motorola, Tait, Kenwood, Simoco and others, however Motorola refused to sell MPT1327 radios inside the USA. Some people say it was because Motorola did not want to cannibalize their vastly more profitable trunking product line. (Like the POCSAG open paging standard overtaking the Motorola GOLAY standard and driving down the price of pagers in the USA by 60% a decade before)

Regionet had difficulty gaining large customers as some people, such as Motorola sales reps & others, would remind potential customers that Motorola had many MPT1327 patents and if Motorola found Regionet had infringed on any of those patents, then the customers might also be included in any future litigation. This dark cloud prevented wide acceptance of any large MPT1327 system sales in the USA. The analog system worked great with features like wide-area group-call and SMS Messaging. However, the protocol had no CTCSS to guard against occasional grunge passing through the spectrum.

Small sites had 3 voice channels and one data channel, enclosed in a 7 ft cabinet with combining connected with 56K DDS circuits. Larger sites had 8 to 16 channels connected with T1 circuits. We had interconnected switches in Los Angeles, Oakland, Portland and Seattle, allowing a handheld or mobile in San Diego to talk to a handheld or mobile in Seattle and most inland & coastal areas in between.

Eventually around 2001, Mobex Communications at the time, the second or third largest national Motorola MSS purchased Regionet, hoping to convince Motorola to sell MPT1327 radios in the USA and expand the system nation wide. Reportly, Motorola would not budge, but eventually agreed to build & sell Passport compatible radios. However, it was rumored at the time the pricing was excessive and the network technology was buggy and unproven. Kenwood, Tait and others continued to make MPT1327 radios available, but Mobex reportly only wanted to sell Motorola brand radios.

Eventually, before a decision could be made, Nextel purchased all Mobex 800 MHz repeaters for around $110,000,000 cash and Mobex disolved it operations, paid it debts and sold all remaining assets. This effectively ended the MPT1327 systems.
 
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