Supplementary antenna for Grundig G6?

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Kenrod

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Scored a Grundig G6 Aviator Buzz Aldrin edition. I've scanned public service for many years but SW is new to me. I know it's not the Cadillac of SW but as far as the antenna jack goes....what's inside it? It loooks like a 1/8" phone jack from the exterior. But I can't find an accessory antenna for it. So I'm wondering what kind of plug it is so I know just how to go about making antenna. Thanks.
 

ka3jjz

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According to the Universal website, it's a 3.5mm phono.

You probably don't want to put too much of an antenna on portables like these - they will tend to overload, causing you to hear signals all over the place instead of what you really want to hear. A small active loop is a good bet, such as:

Kaito KA33 Active Loop Antenna KA-33

(note: All links are in blue) 73 (best regards) Mike
 

unixfreak0037

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Try this: get about 50' of regular wire, hook a alligator clip to one end and hook that to your whip. Run the other end to something outside up in the air. If it works out for you like it did for me, you might be surprised what you can pick up with that. I live in Kentucky, and I could hear a ham from Scotland (barely) on 40 meter with my Sony ICF with that kind of setup.
 

ka3jjz

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True, but there's a serious catch, at least with some portables - there's a small amplifier attached to the whip, so adding 50 foot of wire to the whip might increase the chances of overloading.

In addition there's a side benefit to these smaller loops - they're less sensitive to some types of noise sources. In an indoor enviornment, that can be a plus 73 Mike
 

unixfreak0037

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True, but there's a serious catch, at least with some portables - there's a small amplifier attached to the whip, so adding 50 foot of wire to the whip might increase the chances of overloading.

In addition there's a side benefit to these smaller loops - they're less sensitive to some types of noise sources. In an indoor enviornment, that can be a plus 73 Mike
Mike,

Would that indoor active antenna work better for me than my 50' outdoor wire?

John
Any antenna outdoors is going to outperform an indoor antenna in terms of hearing stations, no question. However, let's be clear here - such a wire is also very susceptible to hearing all sorts of noise from virtually anything in the immediate area of the home - so in that sense, your reception is somewhat compromised. In addition, the possible overloading (and this is very dependent on where you are geographically - East Coast listeners have a much higher chance of this then West Coasters, as well as the time of day and frequency) can cause you to hear signals where you normally shouldn't. You didn't say which Sony you had, but some of them have a RF gain control that would mitigate this to some degree.

Loops typically have a lower gain, which means less overloading, however you would likely hear somewhat less. However, since they reject certain kinds of noise, the lower signal strength is compensated for by having a cleaner signal. This is what you really should go for, even if you are just doing some casual listening. Don't make the mistake of thinking louder is better. Sometimes this simply isn't true.

It is something of a tradeoff, and it's up to the person to make the call. If it were me, and I could have something outdoors, putting something outside wins hands down. But there's lots of folks - myself included - where this isn't possible, and loops are a good next choice.

73 Mike
 
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jackj

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Loop antennas

True, but there's a serious catch, at least with some portables - there's a small amplifier attached to the whip, so adding 50 foot of wire to the whip might increase the chances of overloading.

In addition there's a side benefit to these smaller loops - they're less sensitive to some types of noise sources. In an indoor enviornment, that can be a plus 73 Mike
Plus they are directional, or should be. You can null out interfering signals as they have a sharp null broadside on to the source.
 

Nightshade

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Try this: get about 50' of regular wire, hook a alligator clip to one end and hook that to your whip. Run the other end to something outside up in the air. If it works out for you like it did for me, you might be surprised what you can pick up with that. I live in Kentucky, and I could hear a ham from Scotland (barely) on 40 meter with my Sony ICF with that kind of setup.

This is the best route to go. Under no cause use an amplified antenna of any kind. Portable radios can't handle an amplified signal.
 

ka3jjz

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Not precisely correct. These low-gain loops have just enough gain to overcome the low signal levels most loops have, and since many are tuned, you gain an extra measure of selectivity to overcome noise and some adjacent interference. They can be quite beneficial when used properly, and some do require a bit of user fiddling to learn which combinations work best for their environment.

I do agree, however, that high gain (20db on some of these active antennas) is far and away too much for a portable - they're just not designed to handle that kind of a signal input 73 Mike
 
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