Tacamo Communications System/Global Strike Command

Saint

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
4,009
Location
Fort Erie Ontario Canada
Does any one have a up to date list of frequencies for the Tacamo Communications System/Global Strike Command EAM Messages, any help appreciated.
Steve
 

Edelweiss

Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2019
Messages
71
Are these freqs actually "global"? I think some of it comes from satellites for remote sites like silos, am I right? Might I hear something in Europe?
 

reconrider8

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Dec 26, 2007
Messages
2,741
Location
Eastern, NC
Are these freqs actually "global"? I think some of it comes from satellites for remote sites like silos, am I right? Might I hear something in Europe?
You will hear it globally. When I first started monitoring websdrs I used to listen to one out of Europe and hear the global freqs there
 

GlobalNorth

Active Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
May 2, 2020
Messages
1,405
Location
Fort Misery
Are these freqs actually "global"? I think some of it comes from satellites for remote sites like silos, am I right? Might I hear something in Europe?
8992.0 MHz is often heard through western Europe.

SiIo crews can receive HF, UHF [ the nearly obsolete MilStar system], and SHF on the AEHF system.

Because of the USN SSBN fleet, the systems are truly global.
 

Edelweiss

Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2019
Messages
71
Yes thanks, I hear them HF easily. But never looked for them on higher freqs. Will have a listen now!
(I meant my comment was only referring to UHF. Would I hear something in Europe?)
 

wbagley

Active Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 3, 2004
Messages
822
Location
Near Louisville, Kentucky
The E-6s routinely transmit out over the water on VLF freqs 17.8 kHz Atlantic, 22.7 kHz Pacific and Gulf of Mexico and Great Lakes 27.2 kHz.

Also, I believe I've seen the E-4s transmit VLF off the Upper Penninsula of Michigan on 31.4 kHz.

Some previous posts with screenshots of the VLF TACAMO transmissions:

(117) Search results for query: tacamo | RadioReference.com Forums
 

Hooligan

Member
Joined
May 15, 2002
Messages
1,264
Location
Clark County, Nevada
8992.0 MHz is often heard through western Europe.

SiIo crews can receive HF
US Minuteman MAFs/LCCs phased-out HF decades ago. The equipment was initially retired in-place, meaning the gear still sat in the racks but powered-down & the newer Missile Combat Crews weren't trained on it/no crew proficiency testing, but in subsequent major modifications, the HF gear was removed. The Missile Wing Command Post (at the AFB) and Alternate Command Post/Squadron Command Post at designated MAFs had the HF gear & soft antennas for a little while longer, but it's still long-gone. They still receive the Survivable Low Frequency Communications System. Interestingly, one flavor of the Minuteman system (the "Sylvania sites") also utilized Medium Frequency spectrum for short-range links, and all the sites used a UHF signal to link the ISST (SHF for MILSTAR) gear located in a 'soft' location (the MAF's Security Control Center) with the Launch Control Capsule via the site's existing hardened UHF antenna. Later upgrades gave the Missile Combat Crew direct EHF SATCOM access, and the Minuteman MEECN Program update, amongst other comms system changes/updates, provided the newer waveforms used by the Advanced EHF nuclear command & control system. Bottom-line: Joint Chiefs of Staff has chosen some hardened, redundant SATCOM systems to replace several of the older Minimum Essential Emergency Communications Systems, specifically for the Minuteman ICBMs, but also other strategic forces. MEECN is the Network or systems that ensures critical communications -- Emergency Action Messages -- from the National Command Authority to US strategic nuclear forces.

As someone that monitoring the Strategic Air Command 'Giant Talk' network heavily in the 1980s, I'm sure I occasionally heard Minuteman & Titan II sites occasionally on HF/SSB but the one time I later found out for sure that I heard them was probably around 40 years ago, on 11494kHz USB. Some of you may rcognize that as a longtime COTHEN channel, but prior to that, it was a Strategic Air Command HF discrete. What I heard was a Minuteman Squadron Command Post LCC radio-checking the other Launch Control Centers in the Squadron. They ID'ed with a tactical callword and numeric suffix.
 

n6hgg

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
59
Location
Arcata California
So you are saying no eam's on hf anymore? They simulcast regularly on 5 or more hf frequencies to this day. Maybe I don't get your drift. You probably are talking only about the Minuteman systems. Current HF frequencies I hear them on are 4724, 8229, 11175, 15016, and 19611 all usb. Undoubtedly there are others and I also of course hear them on the UHF frequencies mentioned above.
 
Last edited:

drdispatch

Old Timer
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Messages
1,114
Location
Fightin' River, Michigan
What many believe to be EAMs are simply radio traffic at routine levels. They might be administrative or routine traffic, training, radio checks, or intel based traffic to alter traffic analysis monitors.
I think the term "EAM" has taken on a generic quality, like "Kleenex" or "Frisbie". The thing is, since they're encoded, you won't know if it's training, an exercise, a NOTAM, or The Big One until you see the flash.
 

dlwtrunked

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
1,607
You need to explain that. It is vague enough that some of us know better than what we think you may be saying.
 

dlwtrunked

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
1,607
Hi Tim. From my old notes:
The missile sites back about 50 years ago used to have their own net on HF with March AFB ("Capsule"--non-rotating call) acting as net control. Most common heard frequency was E2 (Echo 2, 4495 lsb) - note that the long gone SAC B net used the other sideband (E1 4495 usb). But indeed 11494 L1 was also a frequency used by them (they also used P1 9057 usb) . Mention was often made of "MRCS status". Ocassionally, they would roll call and one could tell Minuteman from Titan II by the number of LCC stations starting with the same codename (then followed by individual numbers).
 
Top