Technician privileges

billythekid1

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When will technicians capability on at80 in 40and 15 meter phone .I hear a lot of Yeehaw aBout It is the FCC or ARRL doing anything like a comeback answer 73
 

AK9R

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The last word I had from a member of the ARRL Board of Directors is that the ARRL is preparing a proposal that will be presented to the FCC.
 

KB4MSZ

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It doesn't matter to me personally, but I just wonder how "welcome" a Technician class operator would be on the already crowded 40 and 80 meter General portion bands. To be frank, the General portion of 80 unfortunately can be rather unreasonable as it is, taking another bite of their spectrum for the entry class license I think would go over like a led balloon. In the case of 15 meters, however, I can't see that as being an issue, at least not with our current solar cycle condition.
 

ko6jw_2

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If you have a Technician license and want to work HF it's easy enough to get a General. Way back the Technician and General tests were the same. The only difference was the code. Now no code. So what is the problem just upgrade.

My experience is that having HF privileges and getting on HF are two different things. Getting on HF requires buying an HF radio, power supply, antenna(s) and feed line(s). It also requires space. These are barriers for a lot of hams, even experienced ones. The tests (even Extra) are minor in comparison.

The operator with a new Technician license and a CCR isn't going to get on HF.

We have dumbed down licenses anyway. The idea of incentive licensing is going away.
 

K4EET

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<snip> We have dumbed down licenses anyway. The idea of incentive licensing is going away.
I fully agree with you there.

Besides, Technicians already have HF privileges on 80 Meters CW (Continuous Wave, i.e. Morse Code), 40 Meters CW, 15 Meters CW, and 10 Meters RTTY (Radio TeleTYpe), data and SSB (Single Side Band) Phone.

As it stands now, this gives the Technician incentives to learn Morse Code as well as to upgrade to General for additional privileges.

In my humble opinion, what exists now is a good Band Plan that offers incentives for all license classes to seek higher class licenses until achieving the Amateur Extra class of privileges. We will have to wait and see if further loss of incentives to upgrade actually occurs.

73, Dave K4EET
 

W8WCA

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I like the Band Plan now - I (Being Lisdexic) have a VERY hard time memorizing charts and data.
That said I STILL plan on getting my General License !
(I actually got Tech Plus) at the same test but the Novice/Plus part was dumped in changes)
 
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sloop

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Millers Creek, NC
The purpose in the Tech's cw privilege's in the hf bands was to give them the opportunity and encouragement to master the code needed to pass the 13 wpm code test for general. Since cw is no longer required, what's wrong with a small portion of the band to practice their hf communication skills and encourage them to upgrade? There is a world of difference between vhf-fm on a Baofeng and hf-ssb on a Kenwood TS-990S.
 

mmckenna

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One license, one set of privileges. Doesn't make sense to have 3 different license classes. The only people who ever complain about such a proposal are the crusy old extras who walked uphill in the snow both ways to take their test at the FCC Field Office.
Let's see...
I've seen radio installs done by "extra class" hams that fall under the "WTF class" license qualifications.
I've seen a number of "extra class" hams that make statements/ask questions on this website (as well as others) that show they never studied for the test, forgot all they learned, or again, fall under the "WT literal F" license class.

One test. One license class. One band plan. Learn from there.
 

K9DWB

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For all y'all know about me, I may have found my General ticket in a box of Lucky Charms. What a great combo. A box of sugar filled crunchy marshmallows, eating and drinking breakfast at once, and there at the bottom of the box was my copy of the NVEC already checked for General. Lucky Charms is made by General Mills so it makes perfect sense.

PS if you buy that story, I have a 2 Meter HF rig up for sale.
 

danesgs

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Let's see...
I've seen radio installs done by "extra class" hams that fall under the "WTF class" license qualifications.
I've seen a number of "extra class" hams that make statements/ask questions on this website (as well as others) that show they never studied for the test, forgot all they learned, or again, fall under the "WT literal F" license class.

One test. One license class. One band plan. Learn from there.
I at 63 and having been in the hobby 17 years am not an "old timer". One license makes sense as well. Half the tech class hams today either would like to have HF privileges but have no equipment or have the radio but just do not have the time with kids and jobs and stuff us old guys remember. 80 meters can be a dark place at times, 40 is too crowded with nets and Euro QRM (still) and 20 is either working or not. I really don't see 100,000 techs with their new and shiny one size fits all HF license spending 2k on an amplifier to overmod their signals up and down ANY band. Most techs today are younger than us and heavily into digital. I for one would welcome some new voices on HF. And you can't use the "CB gone wild" excuse anymore, There are enough advanced class folks overmodulating their signals on 80 and 40 running a KW.
 

buddrousa

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If you think it is bad now just let the DA's run wild and see how bad it gets.
 

KE0GXN

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Plain and simple if you want it earn it. This is part of the problem in the US as a whole give me give me give me I WANT IT.
I use to be a big proponent of growing the hobby and giving in to every proposal submitted towards that end. It took me awhile to realize what you stated above and now, I just say leave it as is......I am tired of the give me, give me as well. It gets old and the fact is a lot of these “new” folks aren’t even benefiting the hobby. They get their ticket, buy their CCR, throw it in their apocalypse bag to never to be seen or heard from again. :rolleyes:

You either want to actively participate in this hobby or you don‘t. I‘ll keep getting on the air till there is no one on the other end, the day there isn’t someone out there anymore, I‘ll find something else to do. Enough is enough.
 

belvdr

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Let's see...
I've seen radio installs done by "extra class" hams that fall under the "WTF class" license qualifications.
I've seen a number of "extra class" hams that make statements/ask questions on this website (as well as others) that show they never studied for the test, forgot all they learned, or again, fall under the "WT literal F" license class.

One test. One license class. One band plan. Learn from there.
All one license does is fix the stigma that Extra class license holders know what people expect them to know. To be frank, look at some of the questions that some Techs ask, such as "Am I allowed to transmit on this frequency?" I don't think a one license plan fixes that nor helps people to remember what they learned. If the motto is "Learn from there", why can't they still be learning when they pass the Extra?

Keep in mind, these tests are for amateurs, not professionals, and I don't recall anything in the books about radio installs. ;)

I agree with @buddrousa and @KE0GXN in that it's something you should earn. If we go to one license, what will the test look like? None or will it be all Extra class stuff?
 

mmckenna

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All one license does is fix the stigma that Extra class license holders know what people expect them to know. To be frank, look at some of the questions that some Techs ask, such as "Am I allowed to transmit on this frequency?" I don't think a one license plan fixes that nor helps people to remember what they learned. If the motto is "Learn from there", why can't they still be learning when they pass the Extra?
Good point. But it also fixes the stigma that a new Tech doesn't know anything. I've discovered that regardless of license class, the current testing doesn't really prepare anyone for much in the way of radio. It's a very glossed over introduction that proves (usually) that someone can memorize multiple choice questions with enough correct responses to hit the 70% mark.

In other words, I've not found a big difference between those with different license classes. We've all seen posts from those that memorized all three tests, walked in, took Tech, General and Extra in the same day and walked out with a license.

Keep in mind, these tests are for amateurs, not professionals, and I don't recall anything in the books about radio installs. ;)
It does cover basic electronics and some antenna fundamentals. However many installs I've seen sort of suggest that the ham installing the gear quickly forgot what they learned.

I agree with @buddrousa and @KE0GXN in that it's something you should earn. If we go to one license, what will the test look like? None or will it be all Extra class stuff?
Similar to the Tech test. Maybe more focus on actually reading/understanding Part 97.

It's sort of like applying for a job. Many people get an entry level job and move up in the company without ever having to apply/interview again. That works out usually. As you go through the process, you learn and gain experience. Many hams would naturally progress their skills if they actually had an interest in the hobby.
 
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belvdr

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Good point. But it also fixes the stigma and a new Tech doesn't know anything. I've discovered that regardless of license class, the current testing doesn't really prepare anyone for much in the way of radio. It's a very glossed over introduction that proves (usually) that someone can memorize multiple choice questions with enough correct responses to hit the 70% mark.

In other words, I've not found a big difference between those with different license classes. We've all seen posts from those that memorized all three tests, walked in, took Tech, General and Extra in the same day and walked out with a license.
Agreed. I memorized the Extra exam and aced it, but it means nothing about my radio knowledge. I'll readily admit that I did what I had to do to pass so I could operate in a particular part of the band. There are many techs that know way more than me, I'm sure.

It was telling me all about L networks and other circuitry, but I have no idea what they are even used for. Even with the Tech, what exactly is impedance? Nothing really teaches you the content. It's just a test prep unfortunately, and doesn't guarantee you have even the basic of operations handled.
It does cover basic electronics and some antenna fundamentals. However many installs I've seen sort of suggest that the ham installing the gear quickly forgot what they learned.
From what I read, I wouldn't call it basic electronics. Pass the test and call it success.
Similar to the Tech test. Maybe more focus on actually reading/understanding Part 97.

It's sort of like applying for a job. Many people get an entry level job and move up in the company without ever having to apply/interview again. That works out usually. As you go through the process, you learn and gain experience. Many hams would naturally progress their skills if they actually had an interest in the hobby.
I still think testing is a way for people to prove they have the knowledge and skills. For some of my previous certifications, there were skill-based exams (not written), similar to a private pilot checkride or a driver's license test. You may have it in your head, but if you can't perform, you don't get the upgrade.

Overall, I think there are many little things that need changed to correct an overall bigger issue.
 
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