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the hardest scanner you ever programmed.

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cristisphoto

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Jul 15, 2004
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Thus far for me it the IC-R3
Its easy nough to use just getting it prgrammed is a pain by hand..
Nice Wideband reciver though I'm happy with it..
Crista
 

JnglMassiv

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Mar 2, 2004
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Those first few hours with my new Uniden 246T featuring dynamic-allocated memory were pretty frustating and I fancy myself pretty tech savvy.
 

MarkWestin

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Apr 21, 2005
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Caribou, Maine
My ICOM IC-R5 was and still is the hardest radio that I have ever programmed. Even my Uniden BC246T was easier to program than the IC-R5 is.

Mark
 

K5MAR

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Hands down, the BC101! You had to put the frequency in as a binary code. Look the frequency up in a manual and flip the little switches on the front.

Mark S.
 

CLB

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Messages
160
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Goose Creek SC
BC-350C hands down. Takes forever with that limited keypad. That particular scanner has been demoted to a strictly PC line in recording on one repeater output from my comm station only, for which it works just fine.

And I second the IC-R3. Just now figured out the whole "scan bank" thing, and I've had the thing for over a year.
 

jrs71

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Jun 28, 2005
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Southern Illinois
Agree on the BC-350. I had a 350A once and I still hate that scanner. I ended up giving it to my g/f's daughter after programming it for her. Good riddance!

I bought a 246 last year and had to learn dynamic memory and trunking at the same time.
A definate learning curve there but not all that bad. Now I absolutely love dynamic memory. Got a 996 in June and it was easy to program after learning on the 246. Software makes programming faster and more managable.

Uniden has broken the sound barrier with dynamic memory!!!
 

KT4HX

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Spotsylvania County, Va
MarkWestin said:
My ICOM IC-R5 was and still is the hardest radio that I have ever programmed. Even my Uniden BC246T was easier to program than the IC-R5 is.

Mark
Oh man! I second that - the IC-R5. What a bear that was!:confused:
 

wesct

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Jul 20, 2005
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Connecticut
K5MAR said:
Hands down, the BC101! You had to put the frequency in as a binary code. Look the frequency up in a manual and flip the little switches on the front.

Mark S.
at least you didnt have to buy crystals and plug in the wires onto the board like on the older regencys...

wesct
 

Sac916

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AOR 8200 without pc programming. Not "difficult" to program, just tedious and physically demanding. The keypad killed my finger tips after pressing on those hard faced buttons for hours.
 

johnvassel

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Aug 23, 2004
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Near Lansing, Michigan
There was an old regency I believe, where you programmed 'combs' per channel. Small metal bars with teeth on them , broken off to equal the correct frequency.
The toughest I had was a Sony Air something or other. And it was just because the sequence was so far from what was considered normal at the time.
 

kingpin

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Mar 2, 2004
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416
Location
Seattle, WA
Uniden MR8100 using the Uniden software. What a nightmare to program... I hate it worse than my BC350!
 

Mozilla

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Joined
Nov 19, 2001
Messages
362
Location
South Florida
Shinwa

Well one that makes the list is the Shinwa wide band reciever, it uses a remote, like a TV.
Lots of variables, and features but, one you would want to have daily use or a cheat sheet for.
 

funcritter

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Apr 4, 2006
Messages
180
Location
Denver
Both scanners, my 96 and 97. I had no idea what I was doing when I first brought home my 97. I still have no idea how to program it, I just downloaded some Win 97 files that had everything I wanted in them and used those.
 

maalox

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Jan 21, 2006
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755
Location
n y c
hi.. anybody had a alinco djx3 i think this was harder to program than the icom r5.
 

CWR

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Dec 5, 2004
Messages
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Radios that I thought (at the time) were hard to program , the Yupiteru MVT-9000 , & the Standard CCR-708A.........
 

richster

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Dec 19, 2002
Messages
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Location
Regina, Sask.
K5MAR said:
Hands down, the BC101! You had to put the frequency in as a binary code. Look the frequency up in a manual and flip the little switches on the front.

Mark S.
I absolutlely agree, and therefore give this scanner a 2nd nomination. It was one of the very first scanners ever made that utilized PLL technoloogy (no crystals needed). Those switches basically manipulated the program legs on the PLL chip. If you didn't know how a binary system worked, you sure had to learn it to operate this beastie.

Regards,
Richster.
 
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