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TK-7160 DCS Question

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MESDA6

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I need to update channels in a couple of volunteer agency TK-7160's. We have Version 1.01 of the Kenwood Software.

Several channels that we need to program have changed from no PL Code to a DCS setting of 156. In this version of the software, there are 2 options marked D156I and D156N. I'm not able to locate any info as to whether or not one of these is the correct setting for the new DCS, or if neither is correct and I need to upgrade the software in order to program the correct DCS code.

All documentation regarding the change simply refers to DCS156, and makes no reference to I or N at the end of the number,

Can anyone advise?

Thanks!
 

N5XPM

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D156N is normal. D156I is inverted.
DCS156 should be programmed as D156N most of the time.
Try programming all the channels with D156N and test one radio on the repeaters.
If it is correct, it will activate the repeater and/or open the squelch on a simplex channel, confirming you have it programmed correctly.
 

MESDA6

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D156N is normal. D156I is inverted.
DCS156 should be programmed as D156N most of the time.
Try programming all the channels with D156N and test one radio on the repeaters.
If it is correct, it will activate the repeater and/or open the squelch on a simplex channel, confirming you have it programmed correctly.
Thanks for the fast reply! It is most likely normal. I will test it with one of the dispatch centers that monitors the channel.

Thanks again for your help.
 

cabletech

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As a rule, unless a system specfily states other wise, are PL/DPL codes are in the 'normal' format.

(D156n)

VERY few systems, if any, use the inverted DPL. I know in Nothern Cal, Oregon, and Western Washing, there is only 1 user (at this time) using the inverted DPL, and that is a private company.
 

n1das

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D156N = D265I
D265N = D156I

D156N and D265N (and D156I and D265I) are inverses of each other. In general any radio that can do DCS can do inverted DCS. If you have a normal code you can look up its inverse in the table of standard DCS codes, and vice versa, i.e., if you have an inverted code you can look up its inverse as a normal code.

More info on DCS/DPL operation:
DPL / DCS Information
This is probably the best technical reference I've been able to find online.
 
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ramal121

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D156N = D265I
D265N = D156I

D156N and D265N (and D156I and D265I) are inverses of each other. In general any radio that can do DCS can do inverted DCS. If you have a normal code you can look up its inverse in the table of standard DCS codes, and vice versa, i.e., if you have an inverted code you can look up its inverse as a normal code.

More info on DCS/DPL operation:
DPL / DCS Information
This is probably the best technical reference I've been able to find online.
Exactly. It's all how the receiver extracts the code. Some designs will invert the code. If this is the case, you'll have to hunt for the correct code in the normal table that is the inverse equivalent to make things work. Confusion for sure. Better to keep the same code number but use the inverse option for those radios that need it.

Sometimes the transmitter will invert the code. Putting a Comm-Spec DCS encoder on an old Micor compa comes to mind for some reason.

You won't see an inverse code used much because there is no advantage to it if it's not really needed. It is not a whole set of different codes to use, just the normal table kinda jumbled around.

Most all modern microprocessor controlled radios these days are on the same page and using the normal table for codes always works.
 
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