Transmitter Output Restrictions In Florida

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wa8iqo

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Hello everyone.

I moved to Central Florida last year. Just recently I read somewhere that Amature Radio Operators were limited to a transmission output power of no more then 50 watts within any geographical boundaries of Florida. The reason being is due to Florida having an over abundance of meany military bases.

Is this true?

I have been looking at Florida State Statues and FCC part 97 but havnt located any facts or documentation yet. Can any one provide guidance on were I can find and download the legal ruling on this?

Thanks
 

jpb286

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70cm Power Restrictions

wa8iqo,

The reason for the restrictions is to prevent interference to the flight termination systems.

Here are the relevant sections of CFR47 part 97.313(f):

(f) No station may transmit with a transmitter power exceeding 50 W PEP on the UHF 70 cm band from an area specified in paragraph (a) of footnote US270 in §2.106, unless expressly authorized by the FCC after mutual agreement, on a case-by-case basis, between the District Director of the applicable field facility and the military area frequency coordinator at the applicable military base. An Earth station or telecommand station, however, may transmit on the 435-438 MHz segment with a maximum of 611 W effective radiated power (1 kW equivalent isotropically radiated power) without the authorization otherwise required. The transmitting antenna elevation angle between the lower half-power (?3 dB relative to the peak or antenna bore sight) point and the horizon must always be greater than 10°.


US270 In the band 420-450 MHz, the following provisions shall apply to the amateur service:

(a) The peak envelope power of an amateur station shall not exceed 50 watts in the following areas, unless expressly authorized by the FCC after mutual agreement, on a case-by-case basis, between the District Director of the applicable field office and the military area frequency coordinator at the applicable military base. For areas (5) through (7), the appropriate military coordinator is located at Peterson AFB, CO.

(1) Arizona, Florida and New Mexico.

Part 97 Text
US270
 

Rred

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"within any geographical boundaries of Florida. " Apparently not. How that USC paragraph should be interpreted is questionable, but it would pay to ask the ARRL's legal department for their opinion on it. If nothing else, they would be interested in order to keep ARES operations and repeaters in "Florida" in conformance with the unstated FCC/DoD agreement terms.

The FCC should also be able to respond in more detail. In practical terms...it sounds like this is a restriction on 70cm only, within the immediate area of certain air bases. If your rig can exceed 50W on 70cm, that would be your only concern. Offhand, most mobiles stop at 45 or 50, usually less on 70cm than they do on 2m. (Which may be why no one is generally aware of this.)
 

KK4JUG

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.....but it would pay to ask the ARRL's legal department for their opinion on it.

The FCC should also be able to respond in more detail. In practical terms)
Why ask ARRL any legal questions?. It means nothing. The FCC is the only place to get definitive and useful information.
 

N4DES

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The Florida Repeater Council won't accept or approve a UHF coordination that depicts more than 50 watts TPO without the required letter.
 

trooper890

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There is nothing in state statute about amateur radio transmit power, not within the juristiction of the state to regulate.

Gotta be the FCC restriction in place within boundaries of military installations. All in Part 97 FCC rules.
 

Rred

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kk4-
I mentioned asking the ARRL because they maintain legal and regulatory counsel for the benefit of members, at no cost to the members. Their counsel might (and arguably should) be aware of what the rules mean, in practical terms, and might have a broader knowledge of the issue than what you would get by trying to contact someone at the FCC, who might "get back to you in a couple of weeks".
For instance, there's no reason for an FCC administrator to know whether mobile radios are even made and sold with a 70cm power rating in excess of 50W, but someone at the ARRL might be able to just walk over to the lab and say "Hey, have you guys ever heard of...". The context of repeaters or other specialized equipment does not appear to be what the OP is all about, the question was a broader one of hams being hobbled in the state of Florida. And again, if there was a Florida law hobbling hams...legal or not...the FCC would have no reason to know of it, since they aren't Florida lawyers.
What the ARRL thinks, does not bind the FCC. True. But an opinion from a bureaucrat, at the FCC or elsewhere, does not bind that agency either. And they're not going to have house counsel generate a formal (and often binding) written "advisory opinion" for you, either.
 
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