Traveling Ham Mobile Radio - U.S. Repeaters Common Frequencies (2M & 70Cm Bands Only)

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
Hello Fellow Hams and Radio Enthisiasts,

BOTTOM LINE UP FRONT (BLUF)

LINK: Traveling Ham Mobile Radio: U.S. Ham Repeaters Common Frequencies - Google Drive

Did you know that there are approximately 18,793 2M & 70CM Band repeaters in the U.S., which use only 1,303 frequencies? Imagine if you can have all, some, or none of your favorite local repeaters AND almost every other 2M & 70CM repeater frequency for your region programmed in your mobile radio. Well, this was my conundrum and if you’re interested, read further. Otherwise, TLDR and check out my latest project, Traveling Ham Mobile Radio: U.S. Repeaters Common Frequencies. If this is common knowledge located somewhere, then please let me know, because apparently, as I apparently, can no longer use the internet…

After developing the Google Earth Overlay Project for the Entire United States and Territories, I began to cut the Gordian Knot of Repeaters for the Traveling Ham. Specifically, the 2-Meter and 70 Cm bands, due the current equipment I have in my truck. While I have a Quad-Band TYT TH 9800 and a future Yaesu FT-891 shipping, I didn’t feel it necessary to map out the 6 & 10 Meter band repeaters. While the above project was more focused on a comprehensive archive for situationally dependent circumstances that were primarily static locations, which could also be used to plan for travelling as well, it is still a bit cumbersome to hand-jam in all the repeaters if your trip/route is across several states or regional.

Honestly, I am not impressed with Repeater Book’s Travel function, at least for MY travel areas. Right, wrong, or indifferent, I am a country boy from Arkansas and I like simplicity in the real world and I save the speculative realm for the mental world. For the areas I travel, throughout the hills of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, etc., Repeater Book’s travel function only provided about 5-10% of the actual “online” repeaters, which is okay for a baseline, but falls short of the actual situation. Additionally, I don’t like having to cherry pick out the repeaters along selected routes and analyze their coverage areas, each time I want to travel to a different portion of the state. I said there must be an easier way, which there is.

Now, I am old enough to realize that just because something is new to me, doesn’t mean that thousands of other experienced people don’t already know it. Similarly, just because I cannot find readily available information doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist somewhere. However, what I find highly ironic is that in such a highly intelligent, communications focused community, it seems that literally everything in Ham World is a homework project. Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t mind studying and doing work, but what I cannot abide is doing things the hard way simply because that’s the way it’s always been done. I have found several different sources saying they simply program in their repeater’s frequency pairs instead of putting in every repeater, and/or doing “Edge Scans”, and then getting the offsets and PL/DCS codes off of repeater book, which to me is going the long way around the barn for the same information. So, I became curious and wanted to assist any other Hams who many also find this information useful.

IF: Only certain portions of the allocated bands are used for repeaters

AND: There are somewhat standardized/best practice offsets based on these frequencies

AND: There are a finite set of PL/DCS Tones

AND: My mobile radio performs the above two functions automatically/easily via microphone

AND: Many repeaters use the same frequencies, deconflicted by spectrum managers, location, ERP, etc.

AND: My mobile radio has a finite amount of memory channels

THEN: What is the no kidding list of Total Frequencies that are actually used in each state and the United States combined.

So, I’ve done the aforementioned homework and hopefully this can assist others in simplifying their Travelling Ham repeater operations and planning. Sourcing, yet again, from www.repeaterbook.com I’ve distilled the entire 2-Meter and 70 Centimeter Band Repeater Frequency list from 18,793 down to 1,303 total and comprehensive frequencies used on all of these repeaters. Again, based on Repeater Book’s data. The 0.99999% of the “unique situation” repeaters outside of this scope, I care not to address or even discuss. I’m looking for an elegant 99% solution. For example, in my areas of most common multi-state travel (Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, and Oklahoma), I can take all five (5) states 2M & 70CM repeaters, 594 down to 237 for a 60.10% reduction. My mobile radio’s memory channels love this, particularly for scanning, and/or leaving other channels for whatever else. Now I can roll down the road with my favorite local repeaters programmed in and when traveling, camping, or whatever I can scan faster, hit active repeaters, using my Automatic Repeater Shift function, and CTCSS/DCS Tone Scan to chime-in if I want to. Essentially, casting the broadest net, catching the most fish.

I’ve created a Blank Template tab in the Excel Workbook for those who don’t have 1,303 + Memory Channels in their radios. If you do have this many or more channels, then you literally can have every repeater in the U.S. and Territories, so cheers to you! o7 But… for the rest of us, I wanted to provide a tool to customize their individualized plans, if they choose to do so.
STEPS TO CUSTOMIZE COMMON FREQUENCIES

(You can use this list, or use your own source. [State Repeater Council] Simply create your list of overall frequencies and use the REMOVE DUPLICATES function under the Data Tab in Excel)

OPEN EXCEL WORK BOOK > CUT N’ PASTE FREQUENCIES FROM ALL STATES INTO A SINGLE COLUMN > OPTIONAL: SORT BY SMALLEST TO LARGEST (Otherwise Skip) > GO TO DATA TAB (DATA TOOLS SECTION) > REMOVE DUPLICATES > SELECT BUTTON CONTINUE WITH CURRENT SELECTION > IF USING MY TEMPLATE CHECK MY DATA HAS HEADERS (IF USING A BLANK EXCEL SHEET THEN DON’T CHECK THIS) > CLICK OK > BOOM! YOUR CUSTOMIZED LIST OF FREQUENCIES!!!

Feel free to provide comments and feedback.

Note: If you want to snipe so, be it, I really don’t care. If it makes you feel better about yourself, when you didn’t compile this same information with your vast labyrinth of knowledge, skills, and expertise, by all means “glow” all you want.

For those whom this can honestly help, of whatever skill and experience level, this is for you.

73’s & Kindest Regards,

Ryan, AE0TO

o7

How blessed is the man who finds wisdom

And the man who gains understanding.

For her profit is better than the profit of silver

And her gain better than fine gold.

She is more precious than jewels;

And nothing you desire compares with her.
 
Joined
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Oh wow , Ryan ! almost 19,000 repeaters in the US !

Personally I had no idea there were so many. But the sheer number was probably the reason I long ago gave up on using any meaningful directory...their numbers and the un-reliableness of the ever-ever changing information. My experience with repeaters has been very mixed--- the vast numbers were unpopulated waste lands--- and then there was no one to talk to if I mange to access them, anyway.
Years ago I pretty much just gave up on repeaters when traveling (tho I do have several near my home that I do use.) ----Today I am "52" simplex almost exclusively.
In a way this is too bad--- having radios with all the bells and baubles-- and then sticking them to simple CSQ-operated single channel operation. But that is what makes up this Horse Race we call a hobby, no?

___________________________________________

You are to be commended on the work you have put into your project, Ryan.
Godspeed, Cowboy !

Lauri


.
 

ladn

Explorer of the Frequency Spectrum
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1,331
Location
Southern California and sometimes Owens Valley
Did you know that there are approximately 18,793 2M & 70CM Band repeaters in the U.S., which use only 1,303 frequencies?
Great data mining, Ryan! Thank yhou for the hard work. I'm still processing the data to format it for my areas of i nterest.

I don't think there's a practical answer, but wonder how many of 18.7k repeaters are (1) actually on the air and not just "paper repeaters", and (2) how many are in regular use?

I can only speak for my experience in the Greater Los Angeles area, and to a lesser extent in Eastern California's Owens Valley. In Greater LA, the amount of usage seems inversely proportional to the number of repeaters--lots of repeaters, but not a lot of use. In the Owens Valley (which is mostly rural with vast open spaces) things are just the opposite--relatively few repeaters, but a fair amount of regular use.
 

KK4JUG

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GA
I, too, have frequently consulted RepeaterBook. While it seems to have improved in recent months, it still falls into the category of "better than nothing." You looked at frequencies but did you count those "closed" repeaters that are not open to the public? Even more important, how many are not even operable?

I travel quite a bit and always program my in-car radio for those frequencies along the route. Yes, for lack of resources, I pretty much have to depend on RepeaterBook. I usually travel by myself so it's difficult to keep contemporaneous notes but, anecdotally, probably one-third are not actually on the air.

ARRL and RepeaterBook notwithstanding, I don't know that there's actually any way to provide credible information to fill in those gaps.
 

GlobalNorth

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Fort Misery
I don't know how many repeaters are actually in service, but the problem I find is that no one is using them. Whether 2 meters or 70 cm, they show little use.

I was looking forward to buying a 1.25 meter radio for the shack, until I plugged every 1.25 meter machine frequency into my scanner and heard literally nothing for days.

Good luck.
 

KK4JUG

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Messages
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GA
For what it's worth, things seem to be picking up, at least in this west Georgia area. Within about a 35-mile area, we now have:

Band No.
6m 2
2m 9
1.25m 1
.70m 3
D-Star 4
Yaesu Fusion 1
DMR 2
APRS Packet only 1

And one 2m off the air.

Our population is a little over 200K and the MSA is almost 487K.
 

racefan0020

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Joined
Jul 19, 2009
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110
Location
Dover, PA
BIG pat on the back, Ryan. I found out a long time ago that Repeater Book is not always up on the ball. I have most of my locals entered in the scanner. What is great about your Google Map project is that I now have a way to put a location and an eyeball on the repeater that I am listening to.
 

k6cpo

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
1,294
Location
San Diego, CA
Given the experience my club had with the 70cm coordination group for Southern California, I'm not surprised repeater listings are full of errors.

When we decided we wanted to put up a 70cm repeater to cover the Southern portion of the San Diego metropolitan area, we selected a frequency pair and monitor them for a couple of months. When we heard nothing on the frequency, we applied for coordination with the Southern California Repeater and Remote Base Association (SCRRBA.) We received a reply saying our application looked good and would we accept an alternate pair if the situation arose. We answered in the affirmative and that was the last time we heard from them. That was in July of 2016. Despite repeated inquiries which went unanswered, we are still not officially coordinated. We have continued to operate the repeater despite this.
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
.

Oh wow , Ryan ! almost 19,000 repeaters in the US !

Personally I had no idea there were so many. But the sheer number was probably the reason I long ago gave up on using any meaningful directory...their numbers and the un-reliableness of the ever-ever changing information. My experience with repeaters has been very mixed--- the vast numbers were unpopulated waste lands--- and then there was no one to talk to if I mange to access them, anyway.
Years ago I pretty much just gave up on repeaters when traveling (tho I do have several near my home that I do use.) ----Today I am "52" simplex almost exclusively.
In a way this is too bad--- having radios with all the bells and baubles-- and then sticking them to simple CSQ-operated single channel operation. But that is what makes up this Horse Race we call a hobby, no?

___________________________________________

You are to be commended on the work you have put into your project, Ryan.
Godspeed, Cowboy !

Lauri


.
Well thank you Lauri, I do appreciate the feedback. I guess I am lucky in the areas I travel as far as open repeaters. What region do you use repeaters, or tried to use repeater, which are so barren for future reference? It does suck to have a tool that isn't being used. It gets barren sometimes here and its crickets whenever you throw out "Monitoring" on several repeaters and get nothing. I approach it like fishing, some days it is nothing, then other times it is so many you can't keep up! Feast or Famine, I guess. With this experience in mind, I still wanted to distill the actual frequencies themselves, without the "Just Scan & Figure Out the Tones" approach, especially when driving. It also saves, for me at least, my memory slots within a multi-state traveling area. Just hope it can help others, if they choose to use it.


Thanks again for the feedback, much appreciated.

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
Ladn,


Great question, but I definitely cannot answer that one! From a Central Missouri perspective, our repeaters definitely get used, but it's typically a surge usage thing. I am a new Ham, so I have a lot to learn, but what I don't understand is no one sticks around to chat after nets. A morning net I can understand, since it's usually off to work during the week, but evening nets it's "Check-In & Check-Out". I've thrown out "Monitoring" a few times after nets and its crickets. Having used radio extensively in the military, it gets really boring very quickly, but being retired, I'm not running vast operations and/or setting up TOC, EOCs, etc., anymore, so it is what it is...

Now, back to your specific area... California came up pretty quick, due to the alphabetical order on Repeater Book, and I was amazed at how many repeaters were used in Cali. It is sad to hear many of them aren't being used, but when society as a whole have buried their faces into cellphones and computers, I definitely understand "The Why". I think many see it as antiquated or because they are so quiet, folks eventually give up. For example, when I look up the Licensed Hams in my small town of 10,000 souls, there is quite a few, however I have heard only about 1% of them on repeaters. So, they never play radio or they stick to HF, which I personally haven't worked with yet. (Radio is Shipping)

Another thing I noticed is that California, frequency-wise, balloons out into 1,993 repeater frequencies used. Distilled, it is 604. So, California, along with a handful of other states use some oddball freqs, which increase the overall "Distilled" 1,303 National Number Total. Without these I suspect the overall National Number Total to be around 700-800 frequencies. (Pure Speculation) When I say "Oddball" I simply mean just not used in other states as a whole. The sheer Population density alone justifies the reason for the need for all these frequencies to my simple mind.

Being in an overall rural area here, I would say that most are regularly used, if not for nets, then usually during travel times.

I appreciate the question and perspective as it helps me understand your situation out there in California. Being a country boy, I wouldn't travel to the dense population areas, however I do want to get out there to see the rest of that beautiful state! We love Camping and the Outdoors.

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
I, too, have frequently consulted RepeaterBook. While it seems to have improved in recent months, it still falls into the category of "better than nothing." You looked at frequencies but did you count those "closed" repeaters that are not open to the public? Even more important, how many are not even operable?

I travel quite a bit and always program my in-car radio for those frequencies along the route. Yes, for lack of resources, I pretty much have to depend on RepeaterBook. I usually travel by myself so it's difficult to keep contemporaneous notes but, anecdotally, probably one-third are not actually on the air.

ARRL and RepeaterBook notwithstanding, I don't know that there's actually any way to provide credible information to fill in those gaps.
KK4JUG,


Good questions, which on the face seem logical, however... I cannot answer or adjudicate any of them. But... Your overall response is exactly WHY I did this whole exercise! I wanted to cut through all the external changing factors and get to the core frequencies used, or not. Put these in scan and go!

How am I supposed to validate 19,000 repeater frequencies, nationwide from Missouri, when the Repeater Book itself, has a problem keeping up? My radios don't reach that far and gas is too expensive. Tongue and cheek aside, the purpose of this effort was to distill the actual frequencies used to then be used while traveling as a binary GO/NO GO scan option. I tried to explain this in my original post. Either someone is using it or not.

My logic was/is Simply;
DETERMINE: Frequencies Assigned in Given Area
IF: Frequency is Assigned in a Given Area/Region/State/National Level (Hence the Distillation)
AND: Is Being Used
AND: Comes Up During Scan
THEN: Make Contact (Using Automatic Repeater Shift + CTCSS/DCS Tone Scan)

Similar to your programming route frequencies I was doing this as well, but found that Repeater Book's Travel function falling way short of what actually existed in the area. Also, the On/Off "On Air" or Not aspect seemed to change frequently, so I had a lightbulb moment. Perhaps dim, but a thought nonetheless.

I didn't want to program in EVERY repeater for different travel areas for each trip or leg, as we like to camp a lot. Simply wanted to know ok, what are the no kidding frequencies used, because there's only a small portion of these bands assigned for their use, AND many frequencies are redundantly used because of geographic separation and their individualized Effective Radiated Power Ranges. So, after it was all said and done, my suspicion was confirmed, 19,000ish repeater frequencies distill down to 1,303.

Take out the states like California where they have more Repeater Frequencies (1,900ish) used than the distilled National Number, then the National Number is probably like 600-800 frequencies total. Basically, these state populations are so high that they bloat out quite a bit, however ironically, many are dead and aren't used, which is par for course for these states, which is why I would never live there, but I digress.

Thanks again for your questions.

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
I don't know how many repeaters are actually in service, but the problem I find is that no one is using them. Whether 2 meters or 70 cm, they show little use.

I was looking forward to buying a 1.25 meter radio for the shack, until I plugged every 1.25 meter machine frequency into my scanner and heard literally nothing for days.

Good luck.
Global North,


I wanted to make the juice worth the squeeze. Remove all the external factors and scan. Then use Automatic Repeater Shift + Tone Scan to chime in on the fly while driving. Didn't feel like programming repeater freqs every time we travel somewhere different. Program in the most common states we go to and go! If we go somewhere new outside of this then adjust, which is why I broke it down by state. I simply add the new state to the overall list and REMOVE DUPLICATES. Easy day.

Sad to hear the low usage part. It's feast or famine here as well on the 2M/70CM bands too, but I don't camp behind my radio either, used radio extensively in the military for 23+ years, so Ham Radio is waaaay slower overall. Stars just have to align I guess, but that's Ham Radio!

Thank you for your feedback GlobalNorth.

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
For what it's worth, things seem to be picking up, at least in this west Georgia area. Within about a 35-mile area, we now have:

Band No.
6m 2
2m 9
1.25m 1
.70m 3
D-Star 4
Yaesu Fusion 1
DMR 2
APRS Packet only 1

And one 2m off the air.

Our population is a little over 200K and the MSA is almost 487K.
KK4JUG

Being a Hillbilly from Arkansas, I like the "JUG" in your callsign and your quote, being middle aged father of 5 and grandfather of 15....

Glad to here some activity down there in Georgia way, as we were literally looking at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds down there. We get them half-priced, being a Vet, and there's some beautiful places down there as well as Ala-Freakin'-Bama. Just want to strum my guitar by a lake in the woods, and play radio, when we're not doing the outdoors piece. Prior to this mobile radio exercise, I did a project more for offline archival reasons, with the Google Earth Overlays of all U.S. Repeaters. I like to visually see the orientation and locations of stuff, however like the rest of Repeater Book, there are areas where much of the information is incorrect. But, the way I see it is if the range of a repeater is 50 miles+ then knowing EXACTLY where the repeater is kinda splitting hairs. If interested it's located here: The Google Earth Repeaters Overlay Project for the Entire United States and Territories

Keep On Hammin'!

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
BIG pat on the back, Ryan. I found out a long time ago that Repeater Book is not always up on the ball. I have most of my locals entered in the scanner. What is great about your Google Map project is that I now have a way to put a location and an eyeball on the repeater that I am listening to.
RaceFan0020,

Well Thank You.

That project has it's uses for many different situations, but this one I simply want to know what the true sight picture was for frequencies used. Trim down the redundancies, throw em' in the mobile memory and scan. If something hits then fine, if not fine, turn up my road tunes, or listen to CB Channels for entertainment. From what I've discovered in Ham Radio, thus far is that 1. Everything is a Homework Project. 2. Most of it is unnecessarily overcomplicated. I saw this in the Military quite often. Usually, it was a mix of folks wanting to sound smart and/or Job Security. With this arena, I am a Newb and want to learn all I can. I'll never have all the answers, but I'll seek for them always.

Thanks again RaceFan0020!

73's
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
Given the experience my club had with the 70cm coordination group for Southern California, I'm not surprised repeater listings are full of errors.

When we decided we wanted to put up a 70cm repeater to cover the Southern portion of the San Diego metropolitan area, we selected a frequency pair and monitor them for a couple of months. When we heard nothing on the frequency, we applied for coordination with the Southern California Repeater and Remote Base Association (SCRRBA.) We received a reply saying our application looked good and would we accept an alternate pair if the situation arose. We answered in the affirmative and that was the last time we heard from them. That was in July of 2016. Despite repeated inquiries which went unanswered, we are still not officially coordinated. We have continued to operate the repeater despite this.
K6CPO,


Sad to hear that, it reminds me of the Office Space Efficiency Experts, "What would you say you do here....?" Lol

Errors, Omissions, Silent Keys who installed repeaters 20+ years ago, and all the other factors is what I wanted to eliminate here. Either these frequencies are used or they aren't. If they're still valid and being used at the snapshot in time during scanning then sweet. If not then continue scanning. Wanted to trim out all the redundancies and have something manageable for my memory slots, and turns out it reduced my repeaters by 60%. So, I can have EVERY 2M/70Cm repeater (237) in these areas with 572 memory slots left for FRS/GMRS/Marine/Air, and local/regional Public Safety, Military, Federal etc. (The Example Sandbox Tab in the Excel Workbook)

As far as the Repeater Council in your area goes, seems par for the course for California and Society writ large. That whole Ivory Tower/Bunker mentality. I always found showing up in person and making it "Awkward" is effective, as long as you stay reasonable. I'm not sure that Repeater Council positions are a full-time job, however as they likely have a real job elsewhere, perhaps not. Sounds like they're a no time body of empty chairs in a rented space somewhere while they Zoom call coordination business once in a blue moon. I bet the folks who actually climb and maintain the repeaters really enjoy their "Hands Off" approach. Often times I wonder if they do this pocket veto stuff just to make everyone give up, and then they can have some Title on a business card to impress someone who really doesn't care. But I'm diatribing...

My recommendation is you use my Excel, build you a customized list and try it out. Hopefully it'll help, or at least save some of your memory slots. I believe I've provided enough information to build lists completely from scratch. I will say that California is by far the most bloated state in the whole of the U.S. as far as frequencies goes. Personally, I wouldn't live there for many reasons, but I 100% sympathize for all the good people who live there and deal with all the diverse and inclusive issues that arise there. (Insert Eye Roll Here) We want to get out there and see all the beautiful areas, as we love the outdoors and camping, but we'll wait for the pendulum swing back to sanity before we make that trek out west.

Thanks again for your input K6CPO!

73's from Missouri
Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 

AM909

Radio/computer geek
Premium Subscriber
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Dec 10, 2015
Messages
1,112
Location
SoCal
That's really what it takes for an area to be accurately covered – someone (or multiple someones) to make a concerted effort over some time to see what's up, what's not, and try to find out about whether the "not up" category will ever be back. As it always has been. Should be easier now, as you should be able to preselect somewhat with auto-logging scanners, and then find and communicate with trustees fairly easily (compared with the old days of having to snail-mail them). Of course, nobody ever says their machine is down permanently either, just "waiting on parts/equipment/weather/bodies". :)

RRDB has the same issues in some places and use-types that are less popular. Listings go into the database, but it's much harder to know when they should be removed. There's just no good substitute for "feet on the ground".
 

Chronic

Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2004
Messages
531
i know many who travel and they just program all of the standard repeater splits and if they find activity , they just use the PL search function
 

kayn1n32008

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Sep 20, 2008
Messages
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Sector 001
Given the experience my club had with the 70cm coordination group for Southern California, I'm not surprised repeater listings are full of errors.

When we decided we wanted to put up a 70cm repeater to cover the Southern portion of the San Diego metropolitan area, we selected a frequency pair and monitor them for a couple of months. When we heard nothing on the frequency, we applied for coordination with the Southern California Repeater and Remote Base Association (SCRRBA.) We received a reply saying our application looked good and would we accept an alternate pair if the situation arose. We answered in the affirmative and that was the last time we heard from them. That was in July of 2016. Despite repeated inquiries which went unanswered, we are still not officially coordinated. We have continued to operate the repeater despite this.
Better to listen on a potential pair for a month, if it's clear, INFORM the coordinating body you are going to put a repeater up on that pair, give them the details(location, erip, antenna height agl, call sign) and put your repeater up. Keep a copy of the email incase they come back and try and give you grief when they coordinate someone else after you are on the air.
 

Sheepdog777

AE0TO
Joined
Nov 5, 2022
Messages
63
Location
Clinton, MO
That's really what it takes for an area to be accurately covered – someone (or multiple someones) to make a concerted effort over some time to see what's up, what's not, and try to find out about whether the "not up" category will ever be back. As it always has been. Should be easier now, as you should be able to preselect somewhat with auto-logging scanners, and then find and communicate with trustees fairly easily (compared with the old days of having to snail-mail them). Of course, nobody ever says their machine is down permanently either, just "waiting on parts/equipment/weather/bodies". :)

RRDB has the same issues in some places and use-types that are less popular. Listings go into the database, but it's much harder to know when they should be removed. There's just no good substitute for "feet on the ground".
I find the best tool for repeaters is the PTT Button, lol. The cool thing about this process is that it's 100% GO/NO-GO Binary Solution. The more I test these and travel further out and about the more I freakin' love this. I've added two more states, Kentucky and Tennessee and it only brought up my total count to 317 memory slots, leaving me 492 slots for all my Federal/Military/NIFOG/Secret Squirrel freqs I like to "monitor"...

The best part about it I scan the whole bank very quickly and even catch repeaters with an "Ultra Wide Coverage" that I didn't know I could touch, but it is hands down the most flexible method I've come across, and if I can't reach out and Tx into the repeater, I still catch a lot more conversations, which fill the gaps on the road. Plus in a SHTF scenario Txing needs to be selectively done, because you don't want to telegraph too much. My old military OPSEC mindset I guess.

From what I've seen thus far, as far as feedback from folks here and on QRZ, repeater maintenance seems to fall off the scope the closer you get to the coasts and higher population areas, but that's par for course and why I don't live there!

This was my logic process when started this project.
Dead Repeater = Self Culled (Millisecond on a Scan/Varies by Radio)

IF: It is an Open Repeater
AND: It is being Used
THEN: Automatic Repeater Shift + CTCSS/DCS/Tone Scan = Talk
OR: Can't Talk... Listen & Enjoy the Show

Hopefully it helps some folks IF they choose to check er' out.

73's

Ryan, AE0TO
o7
 
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