TRX-1 -2 Programming a large Multi-Site Trunked System

Davey1

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I travel around NW Ohio with my TRX-1, listening to the Ohio MARCS Trunked radio system. I want to program the radio to listen as I move around the area, but always want to hear the sites that are within range. There may be one, two or more sites at the same time.

Scenario 1: In EZScan program one site on the left side of the window and put multiple primary control channels and multiple alternate control channels (up to 32) on the right side of the screen.

Scenario 2: Add multiple sites on the left side of the window, then add the frequencies for each site separately on the right side of the window.

What is the difference between these two methods? Which method will scan multiple sites on each scan pass (in case I'm in range of more than one site at any given time)?

Which method will lock onto only one site until the signal is too weak and then move to the next available site?
 

RaleighGuy

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Scenario 1: In EZScan program one site on the left side of the window and put multiple primary control channels and multiple alternate control channels (up to 32) on the right side of the screen.

Scenario 2: Add multiple sites on the left side of the window, then add the frequencies for each site separately on the right side of the window.

What is the difference between these two methods? Which method will scan multiple sites on each scan pass (in case I'm in range of more than one site at any given time)?

Under scenario 1 you won't know what site you are listening too, you also will not be able to program in all available control channels and alts, also if another site nearby uses a control channel as a voice channel there may be issues with reception. From experience, you'll most likely want to use scenario 2.

Which method will lock onto only one site until the signal is too weak and then move to the next available site?
Neither, both methods will stop on any site with traffic if that site is in range.
 

lamarrsy

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My understanding of Whistler scanners trunking systems scanning is that, by programming sites with the « roam » option, the scanner would stop and use the site with the strongest signal (thus « within range »), right ?
 

tvengr

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My understanding of Whistler scanners trunking systems scanning is that, by programming sites with the « roam » option, the scanner would stop and use the site with the strongest signal (thus « within range »), right ?
The Whistler scanners using EZ-Scan software are in Roam all of the time. They will receive only the site with the best signal. The WS1040 and WS1065 have a Multi-Site choice of Roam, Stationary, and Off. Roam receives only the site with the best signal. Stationary receives all sites within range whose control channels are in the frequency list. If using only a single site, set Multi-Site to Off.
 

lamarrsy

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The Whistler scanners using EZ-Scan software are in Roam all of the time. They will receive only the site with the best signal. The WS1040 and WS1065 have a Multi-Site choice of Roam, Stationary, and Off. Roam receives only the site with the best signal. Stationary receives all sites within range whose control channels are in the frequency list. If using only a single site, set Multi-Site to Off.
Thanks for the precisions tvengr, somewhere I mixed-up the “roam” behavior of my WS-1040 and WS-1080..
 

brian

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Between the two scenarios, performance will typically be the same, but Scenario 1 might sometimes be worse.

In scenario 1, all frequencies entered in the single "site" are potential control channels. The scanner will initially scan through those frequencies, starting at the top of the list. When it finds a signal that it can decode as a control channel, that's the one it will use, until that control channel fades. Then it will start scanning the list again until it finds another control channel. As noted, unless you memorize which frequencies are associated to particular sites, and have the setting enabled that shows the control channel frequency on the display, you'll have no idea which site you're scanning.

In scenario 2, the scanner will initially scan frequencies in each site, starting at the top of the list of sites. It will scan until the scanner finds a control channel whose decode rate exceeds the "High" threshold set for the site. It will continue to scan this one site/control channel until the decode rate on that control channel fades below the "Low" threshold. Then it will start scanning other sites for active control channels that exceed the high threshold. Using this method, it won't necessarily find the control channel with the "best" decode rate, but rather the first control channel with a decode rate over the "High" threshold. Assuming you have the setting enabled that displays the site name, you'll know which site you're scanning. If you're in a scenario where there is a lot of overlap among sites (ie, using a good antenna system, or at a high elevation), the High and Low threshold settings for each site become pretty important to how the scanner handles sites.

Additionally, if different sites typically carry different sets of talkgroups, you may want more control over which sites you monitor. Unfortunately, the menu system on these scanners is such that locking out and unlocking systems and sites is a very tedious process (why does the Edit System menu take so long to load?)

Consider a third scenario, where you create different "systems" (TSYS) objects. Each TSYS would have either a single site, or a few sites grouped together. You can then associate talkgroups from each different TSYS with different scan lists. This would give you the best control for scanning a specific site, or a small group of sites. I generally use this method with my Whistler SD Card scanners when monitoring multi-site systems.

For my statewide trunked system, I typically group sites into distinct TSYS objects for each county, or if they're smaller, a group of counties. I might have from 1 to 5 sites in each TSYS. I group the talkgroups for each TSYS into separate scan lists based on agency type (Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement, Local Govt, Utilities, State police, etc), and then group these scan lists into different Scan Sets. So a Scan Set would contain all the scan lists that contain talkgroups from a single TSYS (site or group of sites). This generally works well. Using this method, you can pretty quickly run out of scan lists and scan sets, so I use V-Scanner folders to hold configurations for different regions in the state. It's time consuming to create intially, and it's even more time consuming to update each TSYS object in each V-scanner (There's a LOT of duplication of talkgroups), but it gives the maximum level of control at region/county/agency levels.
 
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I use the 3rd scenario. It works well for my needs. Just as brian explains, I have all my Fire/Police/Sheriff, et al, separated geographically into individual TSYS. The agencies, where I am at, with the exception of police, covers large areas and use multiple sites. So I assign select talkgroups to each site, so I can hear them as agencies travel across different sites. Or to control what I want to hear at any given time.

It works very similar to when I had a conventional FM scanner. I would just seperate the agencies by banks and lockout what I dont want to hear.

Only drawback I have noticed on my TRX2 would slow down somewhat if all sites had traffic. But chances of me listening to everything all at once is slim. I just turn on my Pro106 when traffic starts loading up the sites.
 

Jphila20

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Before I retired I used to work in 10 Ohio counties and understand how tough it was. I set banks by county number. I would only have the CC's programed with the TG's I wanted to monitor in that county and the adjacent counties. It seemed to work pretty well as I traveled. I only had about a dozen TG's in each bank. I tried all in one and it didn't work very well.
 
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