Trying to listen to maritime

jvcollins1965

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I've taken my 436HP to the ocean three times for overnight trips, expecting to hear something (it's off the WA coast). But I've never heard anything. I think it may be because of my location and that the maritime frequencies are set to "Rectangle". I cannot figure out what that really means. I was using zip code for location but will switch to long/lat next time as I figured out that just places me into the middle of the zip.

Any ideas?
 

MDScanFan

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I have no insight into the 436HP but your best best for trying to catch some traffic are two of the primary coast guard channels of channel 16 (156.800 MHz) and 22A (157.100 MHz). Like most maritime frequencies, these are used nationwide along the coast and waterways and independent of a particular location. Perhaps program those two in your scanner next time and see if you get anything. Traffic will not be constant but you should hear something at least every half hour or so I would think.
 

n1chu

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I've taken my 436HP to the ocean three times for overnight trips, expecting to hear something (it's off the WA coast). But I've never heard anything. I think it may be because of my location and that the maritime frequencies are set to "Rectangle". I cannot figure out what that really means. I was using zip code for location but will switch to long/lat next time as I figured out that just places me into the middle of the zip.

Any ideas?
This is just a shot in the dark, I’ve listened to marine frequencies in the past with my 436 but don’t recall how I set it up. In any event, I offer the following... Did you Select a Service Type? Uniden did not afford us a Marine service type so you have to remember to give it a service type. In the Menu go to “Select Service Types”. Scroll down to Other. Turn it on and then assign your marine frequencies to Other. Or, use one of the available Customize lists and do the same.
 

n1chu

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An edit to my suggestion... still the same concern... make sure you’ve assigned a Service Type if entering the marine frequencies manually. And as Ubbe states, use Transportation as the Service Type. Then check to see if Transportation Service Type is turned on.
 

trentbob

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Make sure service types other and federal are activated. That's what is used in the database for marine broadcast.

You should be using Circle not rectangle.

You should hear something on 5A 6 9 12 13 14 16 21 22A 23 81A 83.

You are in Coast Guard District 13 and sector Puget Sound. Seattle traffic it's mostly on 5A and 14. They use Towers that should cover the entire Coast.

They could be using VHF digital which for the most part is encrypted and is listed here but you should still hear 16 and 22 a.

The NAC for the digital channels is 293.
 
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trentbob

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I just took a look at the database and yes in addition to other and Federal, transportation is used also. I never saw that before. I figured I should look at the database as I was doing this all by memory, I listen to Marine broadcast every single day as I live on the Delaware River in Pennsylvania on the East Coast LOL.
 
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KK4JUG

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If maritime frequencies are your main interest, you might consider a marine portable. I have a Cobra MR HH325 that I use on my boat and it has served me well. It's programmed with only marine frequencies and it scans the band. I've had it about 10 years or so and it was only about $100 when I bought it.
 

iMONITOR

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If maritime frequencies are your main interest, you might consider a marine portable. I have a Cobra MR HH325 that I use on my boat and it has served me well. It's programmed with only marine frequencies and it scans the band. I've had it about 10 years or so and it was only about $100 when I bought it.
Good idea! I've been considering doing something similar. I might pick up a dedicated aircraft hand-held as well, like the
PJ2 Handheld COM Radio $199. I like the larger form factor over the BC125AT.


 

nessnet

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Out of curiosity, I assume you programmed the rectangles? If so, are they the proper size? Also, why?

Don't get me wrong. I use rectangles extensively. But for systems and departments that have defined borders, (states, counties, cities, etc). For items such as marine and aviation, because they are non-jurisdictional, so to speak, I use circles. Also, sites, because of how RF works, I also use circles.
 

WB9YBM

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I've taken my 436HP to the ocean three times for overnight trips, expecting to hear something (it's off the WA coast). But I've never heard anything. I think it may be because of my location and that the maritime frequencies are set to "Rectangle". I cannot figure out what that really means. I was using zip code for location but will switch to long/lat next time as I figured out that just places me into the middle of the zip.

Any ideas?
I'm not sure about useage of the 150MHz band but agree with what TVENGER said before and add the following: I stumbled across some marine telephone traffic in the 240MH range (unfortunately I lost my notes on the exact frequency). I don't know if that's used universally or just on inland waterways--I heard a barge use it on one of the rivers in northern Illinois...
 

nd5y

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I stumbled across some marine telephone traffic in the 240MH range (unfortunately I lost my notes on the exact frequency).
Are you sure it wasn't in the 216-222 MHz band?
That is where Automated Maritime Telecommunications System (AMTS) is.
 

WB9YBM

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Are you sure it wasn't in the 216-222 MHz band?
That is where Automated Maritime Telecommunications System (AMTS) is.
Possible. After all, I heard it a few years ago so it's quite possible I'm mis-remembering it.
 

trentbob

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I agree with circles over rectangles for maritime especially where Seattle and Port Angeles are the hubs but they have different sites to cover the entire Coast. As I was saying most Maritime traffic control in Puget Sound and Seattle is on 5A and 14. My guess would be there is a lot more on digital VHF High that is encrypted now for Coast Guard operations.

Where I am between Philly and New York, CG 121 NAC 293 is for the most part encrypted but today I heard buoy repair in the clear LOL. Most of our Coast Guard operations that are routine are 16 and 81. All Ships monitor Channel 13 so as not to bang into each other and to talk to bridge operators.

Maybe the o p can chime in and tell us exactly where on the Washington State Coast he is trying to listen?
 

jvcollins1965

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Thanks, I never thought of using "Transportation". Deleting location probably makes sense - do you do that by setting range to 0?
Also, how do you switch from rectangle to circle and would it matter if I have location off?
 

scosgt

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I live fairly close to the ocean and NEVER get anything on marine channels. If I take the scanner in the car and drive over the Outerbridge into Staten Island and drive along the shore parkway in Brooklyn which parallels the ocean route into NY harbor I get traffic. It just has to be short range/line of sight I think.
 

WB9YBM

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I live fairly close to the ocean and NEVER get anything on marine channels. It just has to be short range/line of sight I think.
Yeah, that's pretty much the definition of VHF / UHF communication: "line of sight". Unless the rules have changed since I last read through them, ships of a certain size and/or type (i.e. deep-sea vs inland waters) are required to have short-wave frequency capabilities as well--I forget the exact frequencies--and they just might do the majority of talking there...
 
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