TV Reporters and Their News Vans

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n5ims

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The broadcast feed from the truck to the station is in the microwave band although many stations also use standard commercial 2-way radio frequencies for dispatching, setup, and other communications. The microwave feed uses directional antennas and has very narrow beamwidth so if you're not directly in the path would be hard to pick up. The 2-way radio traffic is generally pretty easy to monitor though.
 

n5ims

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Many used to be in the clear, but with many shifting to HD they're now digital and encoded in several different formats. While they may still be decoded, it isn't as easy as it was in pre-HD days.
 

gewecke

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Simple question. I own an IC-R3 and would like to know if it's possible to capture the telecast from their van? Or is this more in the micowave range? Which I'm sure they are.
Try google with remote broadcast frequencies or search 450-451mhz. for remote transmitters and 455-456mhz. for the input.
n9zas
 

SkipSanders

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The microwave links for video are in several bands, from 1.9 GHz up to 5 GHz or more. Most used to be in 1.9 - 2.1 GHz, but it's expanded to other bands, in the last 10 years.
 

gewecke

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The old UHF repeater remote links are still in use here.
n9zas
 
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