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UHF CB Radio

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joen7xxx

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What is now known as GMRS was once called Class A CB (uhf) in the US. That is why it is regulated under Part 95.
 

902

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I've been using GMRS for a while. We use it less now since everyone in the family has gotten at least a Technician ham license, but I've seen a been a big change in usage patterns since the 80s. Somewhere up until the mid-90s, there were many community repeaters (mostly where guys used to park on CTCSS tones to block other people from using them on their repeaters), but it's never been the open use that 27 MHz CB has. Now, it's more blister packed radios with unkey bleeps. I think that change came about around the time the FCC eliminated site-based and specific-channel licensing for repeater stations.
 

ecps92

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:confused: ok [dentist mode on] What was in the link that was of such interest to share with us, about Australian UHF CB :confused:

[dentist mode - the need to pull, pull, pull to actually get the information needed]

To share the link i guess,seemed interesting...
 

ausscan

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AU UHF CB has 80 available channels, with repeaters allowed on 16 channels and data allowed on 3. It is very common for businesses such as traffic directing, some construction and the like to use the band, even though technically they should rent their own frequency.
 

mike_gain

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Mar 21, 2009
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Western NC
Trying to remember....GMRS was Class A. Citizens Band is/was Class D. Radio control (R/C) is/was Class C. But what was Class B ?? I really can't remember.
 

MeddleMan

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Feb 22, 2009
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Athens,GA
I will check...

...and I think class B was the open channel between 22 and 23, on the US 27 mhz (11m) CB spectrum.
 

kb2vxa

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Nope, Class A was from 460 to 470MHZ and Class B had simpler technical requirements and operated on a smaller group of frequencies. It was comparable to today's GMRS and FRS respectively. When Class D was expanded from 23 to 40 channels the 6 BRS channels were absorbed and became 24, 25 (between 22 & 23) 26, 27, 28, and 29 above 23. The Class C radio control channels remain unchanged between Class D channels.
 
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