BCD536HP: Used price BCD536HP

Status
Not open for further replies.

cjorg

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Messages
23
Location
Las Vegas
Hello all.
I'm thinking about getting back into scanners and was wondering what a fair price would be for a used BCD536HP that supposedly is Like new. Is there anything to lookout for with this scanner. This is my first post, been reading for a while and appreciate all the good info.
 

rwier

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
1,915
Location
Phoenix, AZ
" ,,,,, a used BCD536HP that supposedly is Like new ... "
That's the problem. The 536 is about as complex and feature rich as scanners come. I got mine (new?) on Amazon (Lightning Deal) for $430.03 shipped. That was one week before last Christmas. Even though I have not had any problems, I'm still a couple of years short of determining that it is/was "like new", lol. For a "used" anything from a private individual, my "rule of thumb" is "No more than 1/3 of the best price available new" (in general, there are always exceptions). If I were thinking of buying a 536 from a neighbor, for instance, about $140 would be my limit.
 
Last edited:

cjorg

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Messages
23
Location
Las Vegas
That's the problem. The 536 is about as complex and feature rich as scanners come. I got mine (new?) on Amazon (Lightning Deal) for $430.03 shipped. That was one week before last Christmas. Even though I have not had any problems, I'm still a couple of years short of determining that it is/was "like new", lol. For a "used" anything from a private individual, my "rule of thumb" is "No more than 1/3 of the best price available new" (in general, there are always exceptions). If I were thinking of buying a 536 from a neighbor, for instance, about $140 would be my limit.
This scanner that I'm looking at is listed on Craigslist, wants $400 for it. He says it nearly new, haven't seen any invoice. Are there a certain range of years that had any problems to watch out from?
 

N5XTC

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 24, 2012
Messages
819
Location
Hampton, Virginia
That's the problem. The 536 is about as complex and feature rich as scanners come. I got mine (new?) on Amazon (Lightning Deal) for $430.03 shipped. That was one week before last Christmas. Even though I have not had any problems, I'm still a couple of years short of determining that it is/was "like new", lol. For a "used" anything from a private individual, my "rule of thumb" is "No more than 1/3 of the best price available new" (in general, there are always exceptions). If I were thinking of buying a 536 from a neighbor, for instance, about $140 would be my limit.
i really think your 1/3rd the price for used is way low in cases of scanners that are current models or close to current. i will gladly buy 500 of the 536 scanners at $140 used (even $240), if anyone has them to sell. i will take all you have.
 

tumegpc

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Oct 6, 2003
Messages
939
Location
Southern Oregon
Hello all.
I'm thinking about getting back into scanners and was wondering what a fair price would be for a used BCD536HP that supposedly is Like new. Is there anything to lookout for with this scanner. This is my first post, been reading for a while and appreciate all the good info.
Hi cjorg , welcome to RR. The 536HP is a nice base that has taken a couple years to mature. The early production models had several issues that required Uniden to do "Repair Campaign". So when buying used keep that in mind and to purchase the most recent model - look for the serial # 375Z6800xxxx.

You will not see a used 536HP for 1/3 the cost of $140.00 and if you did stay away. If you are looking to buy used, Amazon has them around $410.00 . Just make sure it says Fulfillment by Amazon - just in case you have an issue with the scanner you should have no trouble returning it.

Always check sellers ratings,feedback and return policy before making that big purchase . Good Luck !
 

seth21w

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2010
Messages
988
Location
Somewhere monitoring the air.
That's the problem. The 536 is about as complex and feature rich as scanners come. I got mine (new?) on Amazon (Lightning Deal) for $430.03 shipped. That was one week before last Christmas. Even though I have not had any problems, I'm still a couple of years short of determining that it is/was "like new", lol. For a "used" anything from a private individual, my "rule of thumb" is "No more than 1/3 of the best price available new" (in general, there are always exceptions). If I were thinking of buying a 536 from a neighbor, for instance, about $140 would be my limit.
Yeah at 140 your friend is going to laugh at you if he knows what he has!
 

ten13

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
409
Location
ten13
The question I would have if buying a used one would be, "Why are you selling it?"

Those radios are known for programming and operational complexities, and you'll find that many of those who eventually sell their x36s do so because of that.

I've programmed...and repaired...a handful of those x36s for friends, but I don't...and would never...own one.

And until the scanner industry (such as it is) realizes that the the base of the customers are not those who enjoy sitting up nights in their "shacks" trying to figure out hidden programming quirks or "finding" new talk groups, but are those, such as volunteer firemen, cops, buffs, etc., who use the information gleaned from those radios as their activity, even to the point of necessity, and that pulling over to the side of the road while enroute to an emergency just to change to the next channel..or even raise or lower the volume....is really a setback and a detriment, will things improve.

Maybe the "scanner industry" should try and research the old specs from a very popular radio company in it's day, "Sonar Radio" out of Brooklyn, NY, and take those easily used, multi-channel, radios, and adapt them to present day technology.

Until then, this so called, "hobby" will die a slow death.
 

rwier

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
1,915
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I wouldn't even sell my 996XT for $140!
I'm with you. ALL of my scanners operate far too well to consider getting rid of. My post was apparently misunderstood by most. I should have super highlighted the operative words "... a "used" anything from a private individual ...", and "... in general, there are always exceptions ...".

The number of items I have purchased used from a "private" individual, in the last 20 years, can be counted on one hand (or less), lol. To pay $400 for a used 536 from a stranger when I received a new one shipped from Amazon for $430 doesn't even come close to the "I'll take another look" process.
 

seth21w

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2010
Messages
988
Location
Somewhere monitoring the air.
The question I would have if buying a used one would be, "Why are you selling it?"

Those radios are known for programming and operational complexities, and you'll find that many of those who eventually sell their x36s do so because of that.

I've programmed...and repaired...a handful of those x36s for friends, but I don't...and would never...own one.

And until the scanner industry (such as it is) realizes that the the base of the customers are not those who enjoy sitting up nights in their "shacks" trying to figure out hidden programming quirks or "finding" new talk groups, but are those, such as volunteer firemen, cops, buffs, etc., who use the information gleaned from those radios as their activity, even to the point of necessity, and that pulling over to the side of the road while enroute to an emergency just to change to the next channel..or even raise or lower the volume....is really a setback and a detriment, will things improve.

Maybe the "scanner industry" should try and research the old specs from a very popular radio company in it's day, "Sonar Radio" out of Brooklyn, NY, and take those easily used, multi-channel, radios, and adapt them to present day technology.

Until then, this so called, "hobby" will die a slow death.
They are not dying if anything it has increased in variety with whistlers new trx line and uniden adding upgrades, even if they are paid. It shows that competition is strong and the sales of these scanners are not dying, if anything its picking up as more and more retailers are selling them. As to your comment on customer base, it has been said many times, these are hobby grade consumer radios, NOT INTENDED FOR PUBLIC SAFETY USE!
 

rwier

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
1,915
Location
Phoenix, AZ
And let me add .... I wouldn't buy (or even more importantly) sell ANYTHING at ANY PRICE from/to a friend, relative, or (most importantly) an In-Law.
 

SOFA_KING

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2004
Messages
1,581
Location
SE Florida
I was thinking that $325-350 was appropriate.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
That sounds about right. I witnessed recent "haggling" on a like-new clean 536 in the original box with everything included...loaded with DMR...at a major hamfest, even with a powered-up demo, and it was a challenge to get $300 for it. Then again, hams are cheap and don't even bring any cash to hamfests these days. No wonder hamfests are dying off.

But the scanner hobby is not "dying a slow death". The whole deal of having a built-in database is keeping the "hobby" alive. Whether built in, or downloadable, the "average" listener doesn't have to do too much work. If anything is killing the hobby, it's the "you know whats" causing the agencies to "you know what" nearly everything (we are prohibited to discuss those two thing together here). Even my own county decided to "you know what" nearly everything because of "you know what"! That is a sad day for the hobby.

Today's radios, although not perfect at trunk-tracking newer advanced systems, have receivers far superior to anything we had back in "the good old days". Maybe the one thing older scanners had going for them was better, and louder, audio. Audio quality seems to have diminished over the years.

And although the average scanner listener may not use the plethora of advanced features available today, these new tools are incredibly capable for the real hobbyists who either likes to perfect his or her scanning operation, or be the consummate search hound. We could only dream of these features back then. Many would have said (and did say) that it would never happen.

So, yes there is room for improvement on protocols and tracking, but we are lightyears ahead of anything we ever had "back in the day". Can't handle the advanced stuff? Simple! Use the dummy database stuff.

Phil
 

cjorg

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Messages
23
Location
Las Vegas
The question I would have if buying a used one would be, "Why are you selling it?"

Those radios are known for programming and operational complexities, and you'll find that many of those who eventually sell their x36s do so because of that.

I've programmed...and repaired...a handful of those x36s for friends, but I don't...and would never...own one.

And until the scanner industry (such as it is) realizes that the the base of the customers are not those who enjoy sitting up nights in their "shacks" trying to figure out hidden programming quirks or "finding" new talk groups, but are those, such as volunteer firemen, cops, buffs, etc., who use the information gleaned from those radios as their activity, even to the point of necessity, and that pulling over to the side of the road while enroute to an emergency just to change to the next channel..or even raise or lower the volume....is really a setback and a detriment, will things improve.

Maybe the "scanner industry" should try and research the old specs from a very popular radio company in it's day, "Sonar Radio" out of Brooklyn, NY, and take those easily used, multi-channel, radios, and adapt them to present day technology.

Until then, this so called, "hobby" will die a slow death.
It sounds like your implying that the X36's are not any good because you had to repair some and they are hard to program for the novice, what's your recommendation?

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top