Verdict Has Been Reached - CHP Officer Andy Stevens

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scannerboy02

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WOODLAND, Calif. -- A verdict has been reached in the trial of a man accused of killing a California Highway Patrol officer.
The verdict for Brendt Volarvich is expected to be read in a Woodland courtroom at 1:45 p.m. today.
Volarvich is suspected of killing Officer Andy Stevens in November of 2005 during a traffic stop.
Volarvich allegedly was under the influenced of methamphetamine at the time of the slaying.
A psychiatrist also said Volarvich has attention deficit disorder.
Gregory Zielesch is also charged with playing a role in the killing.
More details will be posted on KCRA.com as soon as the verdict is known.
 

scannerboy02

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WOODLAND (CBS13) ― The jury in the trial of two men charged with murdering a California Highway Patrol Officer has reached a verdict.

22-year-old admitted shooter Brendt Volarvich was found guilty on all counts which include 1st Degree murder and special circumstances of killing a peace officer.

Andy Stevens was shot in the face in 2005 after he pulled over a car in a traffic stop in rural Yolo County.

Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against Volarvich. Both Volarich and Gregory Zielesch plead not guilty.

Volarvich's attorney has admitted that his client pulled the trigger, but he is still pleading not guilty due to his mental state. Volarvich's attorney says that his client suffers from ADHD, and due to that condition he takes Ritalin which has lead to a severe meth addiction. He also states that his client killed Stevens on impulse and that the crime was not pre-meditated.

Zielesch's attorney has also said that his client was a longtime drug user. He also mentioned that Zielesch grew up in the country where he was inclined to carry a gun. But, a misdemeanor of some sort prohibited his client to no longer be allowed to carry a weapon.

A third defendant in the case, Lindsey Montgomery was sentenced to eight months in a residential drug rehabilitation program and five years probation.
 

rooivalk

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scannerboy02 said:
WOODLAND (CBS13) ― The jury in the trial of two men charged with murdering a California Highway Patrol Officer has reached a verdict.

22-year-old admitted shooter Brendt Volarvich was found guilty on all counts which include 1st Degree murder and special circumstances of killing a peace officer.

Andy Stevens was shot in the face in 2005 after he pulled over a car in a traffic stop in rural Yolo County.

Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against Volarvich. Both Volarich and Gregory Zielesch plead not guilty.

Volarvich's attorney has admitted that his client pulled the trigger, but he is still pleading not guilty due to his mental state. Volarvich's attorney says that his client suffers from ADHD, and due to that condition he takes Ritalin which has lead to a severe meth addiction. He also states that his client killed Stevens on impulse and that the crime was not pre-meditated.

Zielesch's attorney has also said that his client was a longtime drug user. He also mentioned that Zielesch grew up in the country where he was inclined to carry a gun. But, a misdemeanor of some sort prohibited his client to no longer be allowed to carry a weapon.

A third defendant in the case, Lindsey Montgomery was sentenced to eight months in a residential drug rehabilitation program and five years probation.

Defense lawyer scum..."My client did it BUT it wasn't his fault...The poor kid had a (fictitious) disorder which caused him to kill an Officer.."

Is anyone responsible for their own actions, anymore?
 

gmclam

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rooivalk said:
Defense lawyer scum..."My client did it BUT it wasn't his fault...The poor kid had a (fictitious) disorder which caused him to kill an Officer.."

Is anyone responsible for their own actions, anymore?
No. People haven't been responsible for decades. It is always someone else's fault.

IMHO, all people who commit murder have something wired wrong in their brain (I'm not talking about self-defense). In other words, every murderer could be considered "insane"; and that defense really bothers me. If you killed another human being (especially in cold blood), then you are guilty, "... eye for an eye.. tooth for a tooth...".

One other aspect of this case that bothers me is that a 2nd person is being tried for murder because he supplied the gun to the trigger man. While the gun was supplied for the purpose of murder, it was not suppose to be Andy Stevens' murder. I wonder if this kind of charge would have been filed for the murder of a non-LE officer. I do believe the person should be charged with "accessory", but not 1st degree murder. I guess this is why the jury is still out.
 

linuxwrangler

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gmclam said:
No. People haven't been responsible for decades. It is always someone else's fault.
Fortunately that's not true - most people are responsible. It's the evil/irresponsible few who have to get their defense attorneys to concoct some steaming sack of BS in a desperate attempt to avoid justice. But twelve good jurors didn't buy it.

gmclam said:
One other aspect of this case that bothers me is that a 2nd person is being tried for murder because he supplied the gun to the trigger man. While the gun was supplied for the purpose of murder, it was not suppose to be Andy Stevens' murder. I wonder if this kind of charge would have been filed for the murder of a non-LE officer. I do believe the person should be charged with "accessory", but not 1st degree murder. I guess this is why the jury is still out.
From what I can recall and a peek at the law, I doubt there is much question of guilt of murder. There are phrases like "...with intent to kill..." and "...assists any actor in the commission of murder..." but nothing that says the trigger-man has to hit the person you may have intended - or even that the weapon supplier needs to know anything about the target at all. But I can imagine someone could get stuck deliberating the "...the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer..." part of the special-circumstances.

Along those lines, if you are a participant in certain crimes and anyone is killed you are guilty of murder. Bob and Joe try to hold-up the corner stop-'n'-rob. Bob pulls a gun but the clerk draws faster and kills Bob. Joe never touched the gun and the clerk was not harmed but Joe is guilty of murder.

Or they flee but during the pursuit, a driver swerves to avoid them, loses control, and kills the kid walking on the sidewalk.

It's those sorts of cases that require juries to debate things like "with reckless indifference to human life" and "as a major participant"
 

scannerboy02

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WOODLAND, CA - A Yolo County jury will return to court at 4 p.m. with a verdict in the case of a Woodland man accused of playing a part in the murder of California Highway Patrol Officer Andy Stevens.

They jury, which was deadlocked on the murder charge Thursday, returned this morning to hear more arguments in the case of Gregory Zielesch.

Zielesch, 50, is charged with murder in the officer's November 2005 killing. His co-defendant, Brendt Volarvich, was convicted of murder and numerous other charges Thursday. The jury also returned verdicts in a number of charges against Zielesch, including conspiracy, but was deadlocked on the murder charge.

Stevens was gunned down during a traffic stop near Woodland. Investigators said Volarvich shot Stevens using a gun Zielesch had given him in order to carry out a murder plot against someone else.

During the trial, which began in February, Volarvich's attorney Fred Dawson admitted to the jury that Volarvich had shot Stevens to death. However, he argued, the killing was not premeditated and blamed it on heavy methamphetamine use and diagnosed mental disorders.

Volarvich was convicted of murder, conspiracy to commit murder, of being a convicted felon and carrying a firearm, possession of an illegal weapon (brass knuckles), and possession of methamphetamine. He is eligible for the death penalty because the jury found the special circumstances of killing a police officer and shooting from a vehicle to be true. A separate penalty phase will take place to determine whether Volarvich will be sentenced to death or life in prison without parole.

In addition to the murder charge, Zielesch was also charged with conspiracy, possession of a firearm by a felon and possession of methamphetamine.
 

scannerboy02

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WOODLAND, Calif. -- A man who played a role in the slaying of California Highway Patrol Officer Andy Stevens was found guilty on a murder charge Friday.
Gregory Zielesch, 50, of Woodland, was convicted Friday of first-degree murder, conspiracy to commit murder, and eight other charges including weapons and drug possession.
A jury heard arguments from attorneys Friday after deadlocking on a murder charge against the co-defendant.
The jury on Thursday convicted 22-year-old Roseville resident Brendt Volarvich of first-degree murder and other charges in the killing of Stevens, who was shot to death in November 2005 during a traffic stop in rural Yolo County.
The jury deliberated Friday after a one-hour session of additional arguments.

Prosecutor Dave Henderson said Friday that 50-year-old Zielesch "gave a gun to a man volatile and unstable enough to kill a stranger for a pittance."
Zielesch was accused of giving Volarvich the gun used in the killing as part of a plan to shoot someone else.
Stevens' death was a natural and probable consequence of that plot, Henderson said.
Defense attorney Stephen Naratil said that Volarvich's shooting of Stevens was highly unusual circumstance, and was not related to the original murder plot.
Naratil also said that Volarvich, a felon on parole, fired the gun because he didn't want to go back to jail.
Outside of the courthouse Friday, three protesters -- two of whom are Zielesch's sons, pleaded for his freedom.
"I want them to know that my dad's a good man," Rex Zielesch said, "and they're trying to put him away for something he's not guilty of. And this whole trial, this whole case, has been built on the word of a very disreputable person."
The protesters and signs were discussed in court. The judge asked the jurors if their presence would influence their decisions on the case. Most of them said no, KCRA 3 reported.
The judge also gave a stern warning to the protesters. He said that trying to sway the jury's decisions is against the law -- and if they try again, they would be arrested for contempt of court.
 

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Unfortunately in California the question "Regular or Extra-Crispy" can no longer be posed with any authority. The Magic Fog and Meet-Your-Maker Juice are also under attack by the "He had a Bad Childhood Crowd and Just Needs a Hug Crowd".

I assert the one place we got it wrong is not allowing the offender to feel the pain, terror, helplessness and victimization their victim/s did before they encounter the sweet embrace of the oak jacket. Context is important in most things in life why not in death?

Some say the only difference between a liberal and a conservative is a single brutal mugging. Sounds about right to me.

If you have ever been inside the walls of any of the Golden States Hotel 6-to-10's then you should recognize that have some humans lives really do have very little value.

I am reassured to hear that the jury was able to muster the intestinal fortitude to render this decision.

Too bad we cannot carry out the sentence publically 20 minutes after the jury is polled and released.

Godbless the Golden States Peace Officers who walk the line and heartfelt condolences to the family of STO Stevens. Signal 10-11 Trooper, rest in peace.
 

scannerboy02

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Jury Recommends Death For Volarvich

http://www.kcra.com/news/16179790/detail.html

WOODLAND, Calif. -- A jury recommended death for Brendt Volarvich, who was found guilty of killing California Highway Patrol Officer Andy Stevens.

Volarvich, 22, was convicted last month of first-degree murder and other charges in the November 2005 killing of Stevens.

A jury announced its recommendation Tuesday afternoon at Yolo County Superior Court in Woodland.

In California, the jury makes a recommendation, and the judge issues the formal sentence.

Prosecutors are seeking life in prison for 50-year-old Woodland resident Gregory Zielesch, who was convicted for first-degree murder for his role in the slaying.
 

scannerboy02

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Statement of CHP Commissioner Joe Farrow

NEWS






[/LEFT]
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE​


May 6, 2008 08-15​



Statement of CHP Commissioner Joe Farrow Following​


the Sentencing Decision in the Officer Andrew Stevens Murder Case


"On behalf of the entire CHP family, I wish to extend our deepest appreciation to Yolo County District Attorney, the Special Prosecutor, the jury members, the Yolo County Superior Court, and all the supporters of the CHP and Officer Andy Stevens. The jury had an extremely difficult job. They listened to the facts and the testimony in this case and rendered their decision.​

"Officer Stevens was killed while conducting a 2005 traffic stop in rural Yolo County. He was an exemplary member of the CHP, serving the Yolo County area as a truck enforcement specialist. Andy Stevens always demonstrated fairness and worked tirelessly to make the highways of California safer.​

"The memory of Andy and other members of the CHP who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty will forever serve as reminders to all of us about the dangers of our profession.​

"I want to commend the leadership of Captain Ike Iketani and the strength shown by all the employees of the Woodland CHP Area Office for their dedication during this most difficult of times.​

"There certainly are no winners from this tragedy. Many lives have been changed forever. Though the trial has now ended and the sentence has been issued, Officer Stevens’ sacrifice will remain an open wound for the CHP, his widow, and the entire Stevens family. Our thoughts and prayers remain with the family, friends and former coworkers of Officer Stevens."​






 

scannerboy02

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MEDIA ADVISORY
>
> Street Renamed to honor Officer Andrew “Andy” Stevens
>
>
> A short ceremony will be held in Woodland to officially change the name of the street where the California Highway Patrol office is located. The street will be changed to Andrew Stevens Drive, and the street number will be changed to 13739 to commemorate Officer Stevens’ badge number.
>
>
> WHO: Members of Andy Stevens family
>
> CHP Assistant Commissioner Kevin Green
>
> Valley Division Assistant Chief John Rolin
>
> Capt. Ike Iketani, Woodland Area Commander
>
> Woodland area CHP officers
>
> WHEN: 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 21
>
>
> WHERE: CHP Woodland Area Office, current location 1975 Wintun Drive,Woodland, CA 95776-9322
>
>
> VISUALS: Unveiling of new street sign
>
>
> ###
 

scannerboy02

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Volarvich received the death penalty. He showed little reaction in court. The judge wants Volarvich to be taken to San Quentin to night.

There is new evidence in the case against Gregory Zielesch. There's some claim that a witness lied to the jury. There are briefings being sent by the defense and prosecution lawyers to the judge by July 3rd, then there is a hearing date scheduled for august 1 at 10am. This will involve two prisoners being brought from state prison to testify, that's why they needed to schedule it so far out.
 

scannerboy02

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http://www.kcra.com/news/16587387/detail.html

WOODLAND, Calif. -- The killer of a California Highway Patrol officer was formally sentenced to death Thursday.

Officer Andy Stevens was shot while making a traffic stop near Woodland in November 2005.

A jury recommended the death penalty for 22-year-old Brendt Volarvich, who was convicted in May. In California, the jury makes a recommendation, and the judge issues the formal sentence in such cases.

Gregory Zielesch faces life in prison for conspiracy by providing the handgun used in the slaying.
 

gmclam

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I was happy to hear this news. I just wish the path to death was as quick for the killer as it was for Andy. I hate the idea of having to $upport him for many years while the required appeals take place. But this is a clear cut case as he was the one that did the deed.

As for the 2nd suspect, I've read some crazy stories. I am actually glad this case is going a little more slowly. Let's get it correct the first time.
 

cousinkix1953

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Defense lawyer scum..."My client did it BUT it wasn't his fault...The poor kid had a (fictitious) disorder which caused him to kill an Officer.."

Is anyone responsible for their own actions, anymore?
Mental disorder my azz. This speed freak is responsible for his own paranoid dillusions brought on by using one of the worst illegal drugs on the street. Crank does those kind of things to some peoples' already warped minds. A loaded gun in the car is just asking for even more trouble. This dirtbag should have given this some thought before he got so wouind up on that garbage. Wanna execute him? Be my guest...
 
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