VHF Marine Programming?

Status
Not open for further replies.

CDS-INC

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
1
Is it legal to program a VHF Motorola Saber II Radio with Marine Frequencies?
My father has a boat and he has an Dashmount Marine radio on the boat as well, but i have this VHF Saber Radio that i want to program and i was thinking of putting marine frequencies in the radio and giving it to my father,

Also, how would you program these frequencies?
Are the Transmit Frequencies the same as the receive frequencies?
and is there anything special that i should know before programming these frequencies into my Saber?
 

zz0468

QRT
Banned
Joined
Feb 6, 2007
Messages
6,036
Legal? Probably not. The radio would have to be type accepted inter Part 80 to be legal. I don't believe the Saber II is.

To program the Saber, you'll need a RIB, a cable, and the software. Good luck with that. Most of the marine channels are simplex. The marine operator channels are duplex.

Anything special you need to know? Look at Batlabs.com for all the nitty gritty details about programming.
 

ecps92

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2002
Messages
11,725
Location
Taxachusetts
Most Commercial Radios [Part 90, are Part 80 compliant] should, but you would want to double check via the FCC [search on the FCC ID of the Radio].

Programming is probably best left to a radio shop, if you need to ask for Transmit and Receive frequencies.

Why Waste a good Sabre, purchase a marine portable for under $200 easily and it has ALL the channels, not just 12

Is it legal to program a VHF Motorola Saber II Radio with Marine Frequencies?
My father has a boat and he has an Dashmount Marine radio on the boat as well, but i have this VHF Saber Radio that i want to program and i was thinking of putting marine frequencies in the radio and giving it to my father,

Also, how would you program these frequencies?
Are the Transmit Frequencies the same as the receive frequencies?
and is there anything special that i should know before programming these frequencies into my Saber?
 

CDS-INC

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
1
Most Commercial Radios [Part 90, are Part 80 compliant] should, but you would want to double check via the FCC [search on the FCC ID of the Radio].

Programming is probably best left to a radio shop, if you need to ask for Transmit and Receive frequencies.

Why Waste a good Sabre, purchase a marine portable for under $200 easily and it has ALL the channels, not just 12
The saber i have is a 128 channel model saber, but i have an XTS5000 VHF i am using now, so i dont need the saber, i checked the with the FCC and the radio is Part 90, 136-174mhz,

what i met when i said special programming, was,

Is there anything i should know about programming marine frequencies?

I spoke with a radio shop where my father lives in long island, and they said programming a saber shouldn't be a problem, but sometimes the radio shops dont know that much about the FCC rules and Regs Vs Actually programming,
 

LukeB

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 14, 2004
Messages
313
I am curious what the output is of a typical VHF Marine Radio, both hand held and mounted. Is it 5 watts for a HH and 25 for a mounted radio with whip antenna?
 
Last edited:

ecps92

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2002
Messages
11,725
Location
Taxachusetts
6watts / 3 watts / 1 watt on a Handhelds

25 Watts / 1 watt on typical Mobile/Ship radios


I am curious what the output is of a typical VHF Marine Radio, both hand held and mounted. I was thinking of doing something similar to the OP with a HT1250.
 

LukeB

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 14, 2004
Messages
313
In comparison, how much of a difference would it be to receive VHF Marine channels on an HT model radio compared to a Marine radio? I don't plan to do any transmitting, just to monitor.
 

CDS-INC

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
1
i dont think there really is a difference, they are both about the same wattage
 

ecps92

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2002
Messages
11,725
Location
Taxachusetts
Depends on the sensitivity of the RX Board inside.

The Marine radios are pretty tight for the 156-162 Mhz Band
vs a Two-Way that is probably set for 148-174 Mhz

In comparison, how much of a difference would it be to receive VHF Marine channels on an HT model radio compared to a Marine radio? I don't plan to do any transmitting, just to monitor.
 

LukeB

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 14, 2004
Messages
313
My original thought was that the Marine radio was tuned better and even tighter like you mentioned. I guess my question may have been more geared towards anyone who has used a Motorola type radio to monitor the Marine channels.

Thanks for the feedback none-the-less.
 

k8tmk

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2004
Messages
316
Location
Stevensville, MI
Unless things have changed over the last few years, at least the transmitter portion of the radio MUST be programmed by someone with at least a General Radiotelephone license. Also, the radio needs to be licensed by the FCC (callsign), and (again, unless things have changed) the operators need at least a Restricted Radiotelephone license.

Randy, K8TMK
 

hill

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
817
Location
Middle River, MD
A FCC marine license not required for pleasure boats operating in the USA anymore. I don’t recall the exact date the rule changed, but it was around ten years ago. Pleasure boats require a marine license for SSB-HF and traveling outside the USA. Commercial vessels still are required to have the a FCC license and the operator must have at least a Restricted Radiotelephone permit. Operators on the pleasure boats cruising outside the USA still are required to hold Restricted Radiotelephone permit.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top