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Wack new radio from Icom

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KB7MIB

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Interesting. Put an access point in your home. Put an access point in your family and friends homes. Put an access point in your vehicle(s), even. It would have a *very* short range capability within the footprint of any one access point, and it may not work in an emergency situation, between different access points, if the network goes down. But, you'll still have private comms within range of any one access point, if I'm understanding it right.
One more option alongside Amateur, CB, 49 MHz, MURS, FRS/GMRS, and the TriSquare eXRS and Motorola DTR 900 MHz FHSS radios for personal/family communications.
 

902

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That is neat. It could be pretty cool to talk about the house and property, and wherever else I have an accesspoint code. Wonder if it needs any ports opened. Also wonder if it's out on the market yet.
 

mmckenna

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Unlikely. The high end codecs we use for VoIP calls at work don't use much bandwidth, and I'd be surprised if they were using a high rate codec for a 2 way radio. We use packet prioritization, though, at work for all our VoIP traffic, so maybe if you were moving some big files you could get some funkiness.

Then again, with used WiFi gear cheap on the used market, you could just install a separate network for radio if there was a concern. Actually, that would be a pretty neat project.
 

KB0VWG

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Yep

Unlikely. The high end codecs we use for VoIP calls at work don't use much bandwidth, and I'd be surprised if they were using a high rate codec for a 2 way radio. We use packet prioritization, though, at work for all our VoIP traffic, so maybe if you were moving some big files you could get some funkiness.

Then again, with used WiFi gear cheap on the used market, you could just install a separate network for radio if there was a concern. Actually, that would be a pretty neat project.
I totally agree on a neat project, Cant wait to see how much they are.
kb0vwg
wqoi992
 

902

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How would a system work?

I'm guessing that if you want a grouping of radios on a quasi-"repeater" system of your own, you would need an IP1000C controller device. The only way I know of to communicate one-to-many would be UDP, but those streams would be of questionable integrity. So, this thing would act as a server acting as a central IP address the radios all register back to, which would send IP packets to each affiliated device. I don't think it would be basic transceiver to transceiver without one of these. They also won't have any off-network simplex. That's a big issue with the current concept of "FirstNet" public safety broadband devices.

If that's right, the cost we have to look at is how much one of the controllers (think of them as repeaters and "system controllers") costs. We might see some of them deployed by "owners" who allow people to use the system.
 

photoguy2

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At that power level, I really can't think of any practical use. That wouldn't even give me house-wide range on that band.
I suspect it is more for businesses/manufacturing. In a plant or complex you will already have existing wi-fi infrastructure. It provides a way for a business to add PTT capability without setting up a repeater/trunking controller etc.

Just my $0.02

Matt
 

kayn1n32008

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I suspect it is more for businesses/manufacturing. In a plant or complex you will already have existing wi-fi infrastructure. It provides a way for a business to add PTT capability without setting up a repeater/trunking controller etc.

Just my $0.02

Matt

While this device seems to fit that bill, many companies that my employer works for will not allow ANY sort of wi-fi device on their corporate networks. Their security seem to think that wi-fi opens there network up to potential intrusion. Even the company I work for does not allow wi-fi devices on our fibre optic network. We actually have a terrestrial wireless service just for our wi-fi in our head office. This outside network connection has zero access to our corporate LAN/WAN.






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902

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While this device seems to fit that bill, many companies that my employer works for will not allow ANY sort of wi-fi device on their corporate networks. Their security seem to think that wi-fi opens there network up to potential intrusion. Even the company I work for does not allow wi-fi devices on our fibre optic network. We actually have a terrestrial wireless service just for our wi-fi in our head office. This outside network connection has zero access to our corporate LAN/WAN.

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They probably do not need this "in" their network. If they put WiFi accesspoints up, then get their own server for the radio network, they can run this thing without touching their corporate stuff. All they need to do is run the accesspoints back to a switch, then into the server (I would think, anyway). Who needs the public Internet?

I would love to learn more about this stuff!
 

mikewazowski

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Same with my company. Their credit card security certification program allows for no unauthorized wifi devices. They've even installed wifi sniffers in the corporate offices to look for people using unauthorized hotspots.
 

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rapidcharger said:
At that power level, I really can't think of any practical use. That wouldn't even give me house-wide range on that band.
Would raising your access point, or adding an extender help provide better coverage throughout your home? I saw another thread here about this very issue, and putting it up higher was the very first suggestion to improve coverage in the person's home.
 

photoguy2

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I know of a law enforcement agency that tried to use something similar...IP phones. Epic fail
NOW that ^^^^ is one of the dumbest ideas I have heard. "1st Street and Main, armed robbery, 2 at gunpoint, third suspect still in bank, request immediate backup............. C*AP, no signal again?"

Sounds like the whole Opensky fiasco.

Matt
 
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prcguy

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I've been using Selex (Marconi) PRR or PRC-343 radios for a couple of years that operate spread spectrum 2.4GHz at 50mw. Most of the time these have about the same range as FRS or the TriSquare 900 radios when operating around the neighborhood or at my work facility.

They will go line of sight real far with stock little antennas and I suspect the new Icom radios would work similar, not counting extra range from operating through an access point or two. You do have to keep the antennas in the clear for best range and if you lower the transceiver/antenna where you body is in the way it reduces range considerably.
prcguy
 

ElroyJetson

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It's a neat idea that I thought of several years ago but had no way to make into a reality. I've done that a few times, predict the future of radio development. Too bad I don't have the resources to turn these ideas into money.

With all forms of communications heading into the digital domain, all communications will become apps running over broadband data networks, both wired and wireless, long and short range. Eventually I think that even the most basic point to point two way radios will form ad hoc networks.
 

902

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It's a neat idea that I thought of several years ago but had no way to make into a reality. I've done that a few times, predict the future of radio development. Too bad I don't have the resources to turn these ideas into money.

With all forms of communications heading into the digital domain, all communications will become apps running over broadband data networks, both wired and wireless, long and short range. Eventually I think that even the most basic point to point two way radios will form ad hoc networks.
They're here already. All of the big guys want to be on LTE when FirstNet turns up. Year before last, Harris, Motorola, and Cassidian were each demo'ing their VoLTE radio emulation package. I liked Harris' the best. They had a gateway controller and the device apparently functioned in P25 protocol with the data packets sent over the LTE network so it sounded seamless and was not "funky sounding" like cellular is to me. The thing could take any current smartphone and reassign buttons, etc.

That's a far cry from these things, though.

Not to fret much. I missed SO MANY boats in the radio business, like the 900 MHz SMR lottery, then buying the licenses for 800 community repeaters (which some guys turned around and sold to Nextel for millions) and so on. My friend worked on some of the original AX.25 packet systems (which I thought was boring...) and then went on to Bellcore. It's getting to be that the regular guy can't afford to be an innovator anymore.
 

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Would raising your access point, or adding an extender help provide better coverage throughout your home? I saw another thread here about this very issue, and putting it up higher was the very first suggestion to improve coverage in the person's home.
OK you got me.

My home wifi actually has extremely strong signal, not only throughout the house but throughout the neighborhood.

This is using equipment, antennas and height of the antenna that most home users don't have. My last home network didn't have such great coverage in the house.

I take back what I said earlier. Something like this might be ideal for a small healthcare clinic or doctors office. I just think about how often I have to reset my gear and it seems like it would be unreliable considering the performance of 2.5ghz cordless phones and the alternatives. But I won't knock it until I try it.
 

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How will this device handle co-channel WiFi interference?

The WiFi spectrum is becoming overcrowded and polluted. WiFi has become the new Citizen's Band.
 
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