Weatherproofing Kit for Connectors and Antennas

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Blackink

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Here's some great info on sealing up your coax connectors. Granted.....the instructions are about a weatherproofing kit, but you can buy the supplies at your local hardware/Home Depot/Lowes/etc...and follow these instructions,for what looks like a great weatherproofed/water tight seal:

Weatherproofing Kit
 
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JamesO

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I tend to use either electrical tape or first wrap with cold shrink wrap tape, then follow up with electrical tape, then use silicon sealer over the electrical tape. To open up the connection, use a razor knife then you can carefully cut through the silicon and tape, then peel the tape off and you will have a clean connection as it was when it was first installed.

The cold shrink wrap tape does not hold up to the element and UV so it must be covered with a decent electrical tape like 3M Super 33, then cover with a silicon sealer for safe measure.
 

Blackink

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I tend to use either electrical tape or first wrap with cold shrink wrap tape, then follow up with electrical tape, then use silicon sealer over the electrical tape. To open up the connection, use a razor knife then you can carefully cut through the silicon and tape, then peel the tape off and you will have a clean connection as it was when it was first installed.

The cold shrink wrap tape does not hold up to the element and UV so it must be covered with a decent electrical tape like 3M Super 33, then cover with a silicon sealer for safe measure.
Good tips to follow also James.

I was able to obtain one of these kits and the tape they use is Scotch Commercial Grade Vinyl Electrical Tape 700, if anyone is interested.
 
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Commercial kits built for coaxial connections come with one of two options. Vinyl electrical tape (usually 2"), butol (Coax Seal) or magic tape. Personally I prefer magic tape.

General rule of thumb, first put down a vinyl tape wrap extending beyond the connectors by an inch or so. This is known as the courtesy wrap (if you've ever tried to get at connectors that have been butol wrapped without a courtesy wrap, you know why this is done). Then you wrap and form your butol or wrap your magic tape extending beyond the courtesy wrap, this will make the connection weather tight. Then he finishing wrap of vinyl. Some recommend going a double wrap consisting of a criss-cross pattern.

Easy peasy. Tractor supply used to carry various colors of Magic Tape for $5 a roll. Courtesy wraps aren't necessary when utilizing Magic Tape. Butol is a pain to cut out but is easier with a courtesy wrap, especially with a flag for easy pulling.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
 

jonwienke

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I like this stuff:

https://www.amazon.com/18384-Flexi-Clear-Elastomeric-Sealant-10-1-Ounce/dp/B0006B682C

It's clear, flexible, paintable, and resists peeling, but can be removed without too much trouble if you need to redo a connection. If you put it in a PL-259 or F connector before tightening it, it will seal the connection from the inside out. Follow that up with a coating around the outside of the connector and you have a very solid weather seal.

I wouldn't recommend it for temporary or short-term connections, but for sealing long-term connections, it's tough to beat.
 

Blackink

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Commercial kits built for coaxial connections come with one of two options. Vinyl electrical tape (usually 2"), butol (Coax Seal) or magic tape. Personally I prefer magic tape.

General rule of thumb, first put down a vinyl tape wrap extending beyond the connectors by an inch or so. This is known as the courtesy wrap (if you've ever tried to get at connectors that have been butol wrapped without a courtesy wrap, you know why this is done). Then you wrap and form your butol or wrap your magic tape extending beyond the courtesy wrap, this will make the connection weather tight. Then he finishing wrap of vinyl. Some recommend going a double wrap consisting of a criss-cross pattern.

Easy peasy. Tractor supply used to carry various colors of Magic Tape for $5 a roll. Courtesy wraps aren't necessary when utilizing Magic Tape. Butol is a pain to cut out but is easier with a courtesy wrap, especially with a flag for easy pulling.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
Yup W5PKY, your instructions are similar to what the kit says to do.

These steps don't have to followed religiously, but using similar steps and products will achieve the same results: a watertight and dry and worry free connection for years to come.
 

Golay

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Same here

Commercial kits built for coaxial connections come with one of two options. Vinyl electrical tape (usually 2"), butol (Coax Seal) or magic tape. Personally I prefer magic tape.

General rule of thumb, first put down a vinyl tape wrap extending beyond the connectors by an inch or so. This is known as the courtesy wrap (if you've ever tried to get at connectors that have been butol wrapped without a courtesy wrap, you know why this is done). Then you wrap and form your butol or wrap your magic tape extending beyond the courtesy wrap, this will make the connection weather tight. Then he finishing wrap of vinyl. Some recommend going a double wrap consisting of a criss-cross pattern.
This is just what I do. I use 3M Super 88 for the first and final wrap. 3M 2242 for the middle wrap. Stretch the 2242 so it turns gray as you are wrapping. And don't stretch the 88 to break it, that will cause it to slowly unravel, so cut if off with a knife. I buy both at Lowes.
 
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