West Palm Beach, FL - Security to bypass the city's police dispatchers

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brey1234

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Nightclub security personnel in West Palm Beach (Fla.) will soon be able to bypass the city's police dispatchers and use radios to directly contact the beat officer when trouble develops at their business. The radios will also be able to contact security personnel at other clubs to improve handling of rowdy or drunk patrons who wander from club to club. The radios will cost $300 for each club that participates in the program, and the concept was tested earlier this year among 10 downtown condo properties. Read more about the perceived benefits here (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/more-eyes-on-street-ears-in-air-new-90335.html).
 

radioman2001

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While in Ireland last year I saw most of the merchants had HT-750's. They talked to their employees and I saw them switch channels to talk to another store down the block. Apparently they had some sort of problem with a customer and was warning the other stores. I would also guess that they have a direct line to the local PD as well.
 

tampabaynews

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Not a very good idea in my opinion.

My city gave parking enforcement radios when I used to dispatch for them. They were not properly trained on them at all. They waste so much time on the radio because it's like pulling teeth to get pertinent information from them. Big officer safety issue. Have them use 911 or non emergency like everyone else.
 

MTS2000des

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The city of Atlanta has a similar program since about 1990 called COMNET. City businesses could pay a yearly fee and were given access to a UHF conventional repeater that was monitored by APD Detective radio where they could call APD directly and officers could switch their (then on UHF conventional) radios directly to COMNET to coordinate responses.

The system was eventually patched to their 800 trunking system (analog system) when Atlanta went 800 in 1995. It also became widely abused by police impersonating unlicensed security guards who would run tags, use it as an intercom, etc. Often times Detective radio would not monitor it at all and no one would answer.

Ironically the city never bothered to get a license for the UHF repeater on 453.25MHz until 2007, after the local media was tipped off about their bootlegging (gee...wonder who did that). The repeater has been off the air since Atlanta went digital, though there is a COMNET talkgroup listed.on the new DTRS. Now COMNET users have to buy an outrageously priced digital radio to use the system.

Not practical when any cellphone that acquires a network signal can call 911 for free. Oh wait, no one answers Atlanta 911! Why bother spending money for staff when you blew it all on a brand new 911 center, CAD and radio system!
 

APTN

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Radios

Not a very good idea in my opinion.

My city gave parking enforcement radios when I used to dispatch for them. They were not properly trained on them at all. They waste so much time on the radio because it's like pulling teeth to get pertinent information from them. Big officer safety issue. Have them use 911 or non emergency like everyone else.
I concur in part and dissent in part. If the security personnel make regular contact with governmental agencies, it could be cost and time saving to allow them direct radio contact. However, I agree that it should only be done if those involved are properly trained in radio usage & procedures.
 

mikepdx

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"Police departments around the country are still stuck in a model of 10 to 20 years ago. It takes a good five
minutes sometimes before dispatch even gets to an officer. For merchants, being in direct contact with an
officer on duty is good for the public."


For merchants ??

What about the lone citizens on the street needing urgent help?
They don't get the luxury of immediate contact.

"Police departments around the country are still stuck in a model of 10 to 20 years ago".

Stuck???
Well, that's someone's opinion.
 
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ElroyJetson

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Well, when you consider that 911 is sometimes called because someone is having a hard time getting his kid to go to school in the morning, I think that perhaps direct access to the police via radio should be restricted to those who have both a good measure of common sense, and have been given instructions on when, why, and how.

Elroy
 
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