• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

What Are Some Good The Choices For Mobile Vehicle Repeaters On GMRS?

JASII

Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
2,552
As posted above, what are some of good choices for a mobile vehicle repeater on GMRS?
 

chief21

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 2, 2004
Messages
1,357
Location
Summer - Western NC; Winter - Tampa Bay FL
As posted above, what are some of good choices for a mobile vehicle repeater on GMRS?
Other than configuring one to act as a vehicle extender, I don't see much value in having a repeater in a vehicle. Repeaters work best when they are located at a prominent site, such as a mountaintop or a high building or tower, away from trees and other obstructions, resulting in much-improved coverage. I'm not sure what having a repeater in a car would accomplish.
 

tweiss3

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
132
Location
Ohio
Retevis makes a 10W repeater, the RT97, that is type accepted and reasonably priced.

 

JASII

Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
2,552
...I'm not sure what having a repeater in a car would accomplish.
My wife and I are ATVers. We joined an ATV club recently and some of the group rides have quite a few participants. Having a low-powered repeater mid-point would help ensure that the front and rear riders, as well as everybody in between, hear each other.


Retevis makes a 10W repeater, the RT97, that is type accepted and reasonably priced.

Thank you. I will look into that one.
 

jaspence

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
2,266
Location
Michigan
A 10 watt repeater does not give twice as much output as a 5 watt radio. 5 watts is about 7 dBW, while 10 watts equals 10 dBW. Used with a mobile antenna, it will give very little real increase in coverage especially when mounted on a vehicle.
 

Citywide173

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
1,915
Location
Attleboro, MA
A 10 watt repeater does not give twice as much output as a 5 watt radio. 5 watts is about 7 dBW, while 10 watts equals 10 dBW. Used with a mobile antenna, it will give very little real increase in coverage especially when mounted on a vehicle.
Unless that vehicle is at a significantly higher altitude.
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
13,788
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
My wife and I are ATVers. We joined an ATV club recently and some of the group rides have quite a few participants. Having a low-powered repeater mid-point would help ensure that the front and rear riders, as well as everybody in between, hear each other.
Well, as you know each family will need a GMRS license if the want to be legal.
Also, most of the cheap consumer grade GMRS radios will not do repeaters.

I used GMRS with family on ATV rides, and it worked fairly well, at least until I was able to get them to study for their ham license and switch to 2 meters.

A couple of things to consider:
-Some ATV's have noisy ignition/electrical systems and will cause issues. If you are going to power the repeater off one of the ATV's, consider some filtering on the power connection.
-Repeaters are going to have duplexers in them, and they will not like being beat around on a rough trail. The duplexer may go out of tune quickly and make your repeater pretty useless. Retuning the duplexer after each ride is going to get expensive if you don't have the correct test equipment to do it.
-If everyone is covered by a GMRS license, you'd do better to have them get better radios and antennas.

We used to use Motorola HT-600's and P-200's on GMRS, they stood up to the abuse pretty well. Better antennas than the consumer stuff.

If anyone is running UTV's, they can add a mobile radio and a good 1/2 wave antenna on the roll cage and repeat traffic if needed. It takes a bit more work, but mounting a small mobile and a decent antenna on a traditional ATV is also a good option.

I'd really be concerned about the duplexer in any repeater in an off road application.
 

prcguy

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
9,991
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
I'm confused. 10 watts is exactly twice as much output and a 3dB increase over 5 watts. Maybe you meant its not twice as much range?


A 10 watt repeater does not give twice as much output as a 5 watt radio. 5 watts is about 7 dBW, while 10 watts equals 10 dBW. Used with a mobile antenna, it will give very little real increase in coverage especially when mounted on a vehicle.
 

N4KVE

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
3,348
Location
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
I'm not sure what having a repeater in a car would accomplish.
Years ago I worked in an area where I could hear my repeater with my HT, but could not get back into the repeater. I had a friend convert a GE Mstr 2 into a one way repeater. I would transmit on my HT on some weird freq, & the GE would transmit on the input of the repeater at 20 watts through the UHF antenna on the car. I used a small HT antenna on the GE to receive the signal from my HT, as I was never more than 50 feet away from my car. It worked great. Mstr 2’s were very easy to convert into repeaters.
 

prcguy

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
9,991
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
Is the OP looking for an actual GMRS repeater with duplexer to use in a vehicle, or a "vehicular repeater", which is usually another radio on a different band tied in to your main vehicular radio to extend coverage to nearby hand helds?

Yaesu has the VXR-1000 vehicular repeater that will interface with most radios. Its not legal to use with GMRS but I suppose you could have the vehicular repeater on some MURS channels to extend a portable radio to a GMRS repeater. I picked up a VHF VXR-1000 recently for $50, so they are out there used.
 
Top