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What is this odd activity on Channel 7 - 462.7125 MHz

RichardKramer

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I have 2 Maxon 210+3 GMRS ht's purchased in the late 90's; the first 7 channels are set to the first 7 FRS freqs; channels 8-10 are programmable to the GMRS freqs and are rptr capable; they still work great. The batteries no longer hold a charge, but the RS HTX-202 VHF 2mtr ham radio battery pack is interchangeable with the Maxons. I also bought 2 AA 12v packs for the Maxons for bakup use. I also have the BF UV82C and the UV82; there is no difference between the two performance wise, the UV82C goes for about $20 more and has to be first programmed on a computer and is part 90 certified and has the Part 90 FCC label.
Rich - N3VMY - KAG0096
 

mmckenna

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I thought only "Mom & Pop" businesses are allowed on GMRS?
-Many years ago businesses were allowed to license GMRS pairs for business use. There are still a lot of "grandfathered" business users on GMRS, all totally legal.

-Small businesses can use GMRS if individuals are properly licensed. Current GMRS rules must be followed, as in each person must be covered by a valid GMRS license.

-As John said above, FRS users can be businesses, nothing wrong with that.
 

bill4long

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I thought only "Mom & Pop" businesses are allowed on GMRS?
GMRS licenses are granted to individuals not businesses. There are no restrictions on using GMRS for business purposes as long as everyone transmitting is covered by someone's license.
 

mmckenna

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Just for kicks, I did some searching on the FCC database for "experimental" licenses.

Northern California GMRS Users Group has been running a DMR system in Northern California for several years as a "test". It's legal under the terms of the experimental license. Although I'd be curious to see how long the FCC is going to allow the test to continue. They've been renewing the experimental license for quite a few years now.

I did NOT find any similar licenses in Southern California.
 

bill4long

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Just for kicks, I did some searching on the FCC database for "experimental" licenses.

Northern California GMRS Users Group has been running a DMR system in Northern California for several years as a "test". It's legal under the terms of the experimental license. Although I'd be curious to see how long the FCC is going to allow the test to continue. They've been renewing the experimental license for quite a few years now.
That's interesting. What is the callsign?
 

mmckenna

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Because experimental licenses aren't in the ULS and WK2XIA is the wrong callsign.
Look up WK2XIK here. https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/CallsignSearch.cfm
Thanks. Keyboard is wonky on my work MacBook Pro, touch pad failed, so I'm at a bit of a disadvantage with fingers on slippery glass.

Linked document is correct, though.

If you look on the oet page, you can pull up their application.
 

ten13

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The NYPD stuff may be happening for nefarious purposes.

After all, it IS the 44 pct.

Then people are "shocked....SHOCKED" to hear that the NYPD may go E......
 

chief21

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I thought only "Mom & Pop" businesses are allowed on GMRS?
Actually, only individuals can be granted a GMRS license, but the new rules placed the former eight GMRS-only 462 pairs into the pool with FRS - and businesses are allowed to use FRS. Only the eight 467 repeater input pairs are now GMRS-only.

(OOPS... Disregard this post! I didn't notice the 2nd page of this thread.)
 

intermod

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The DMR experimental license is WK2XIK (Northern California GMRS Users Group / NCGUG). You can find it here:

https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/CallsignSearch.cfm

We operate two GMRS DMR repeaters in the San Francisco bay area. Their purpose is to evaluate how digital might co-exist in a shared channel analog environment. So its not a technical evaluation. DMR had been around for about 8-9 years and is well established, and exceeds all the GMRS RF technical requirements, except for the emission.

This test might also apply to NXDN, dPMR, P25, etc. We selected DMR as it is the most cost-effective and feature-rich, and solves more of the common two-way radio limitations. The two-slot operation eliminated most of our channel contention issues. I suspect it might also reduce the total number of repeaters placed in operation in a region since two separate groups can have their own private slot (instead of building yet another repeater on a different channel). Also promotes greater cost sharing (repeater and site rent costs can be evenly split between the two users groups).

Can't beat the audio clarity. The voice quality is really determined by the design quality of the subscriber equipment.

The high-elevation repeater is operating in "Dynamic Mixed Mode" (DMM)" so it switches between analog and digital automatically. This maintains some backwards compatibility with legacy analog radios. We setup the DMR radios to auto-scan both the analog and digital, or run automatic mixed mode on the subscriber equipment so it can decode either.
 
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