What is UHF1, UHF2, UHF3, etc?

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RFFR

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I've been looking at some radios that operate in the UHF range and have been seeing multiple bands listed in the specifications. It's usually listed similar to this:

UHF1: 400-470MHz; UHF2:450-520MHz; UHF3: 350-400MHz; UHF5: 806-941MHz

I thought maybe the numbering scheme was just an internal thing used by Chinese companies, but I've run across it with manufacturers in other countries.

Do these actually mean anything? Are UHF1, UHF2, UHF3, etc., designated anywhere by the ITU or other body? Do the different bands correlate to something such as a specific spacing?
 

troymail

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I've been looking at some radios that operate in the UHF range and have been seeing multiple bands listed in the specifications. It's usually listed similar to this:

UHF1: 400-470MHz; UHF2:450-520MHz; UHF3: 350-400MHz; UHF5: 806-941MHz

I thought maybe the numbering scheme was just an internal thing used by Chinese companies, but I've run across it with manufacturers in other countries.

Do these actually mean anything? Are UHF1, UHF2, UHF3, etc., designated anywhere by the ITU or other body? Do the different bands correlate to something such as a specific spacing?
Could be but not that I am aware of -- I'm sure your post is simply and example given the ranges listed (overlapping, 800/900 Mhz, etc.).

I've only seen "labels" attached to frequency ranges recently on Unication literature which I assume are simply a way for them to ensure that the buyer knows what they are requesting/buying and to make it easier for the pager vendor to provide the orrect model pager. However, in the Unication case, they refer to the different bands with labels like "UHF A", "UHF B", "UHF C", and "UHF D" which mean 330-400Mhz, 380-430Mhz, 400-470Mhz, and 450-512Mhz respectively....

Perhaps that is the source of your question..... Have you seen labels of this type elsewhere?
 

RFFR

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So far I've only seen it on some Chinese manufacturers, but more than enough to make me think it's designated somewhere. I thought maybe it was a way to denote spacing, as some would have UHF1, UHF2, and UHF3 and then the spacing would be 25/20/12.5, but some have have three UHF bands and only two 25/12.5 for spacing, etc. Also, I don't think I've actually seen anything listed as UHF4.

Here's two examples from Hytera that show UHF2 being slightly different, so it must be purely a sales/marketing thing for a customer to specif which band they are interested in.

http://www.hytera.us/Catalogs/Products.aspx?id=40
http://www.hytera.us/Catalogs/Products.aspx?id=38
 
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WA0CBW

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I believe it represents the frequency range for a specific radio model. One radio typically won't cover the entire range and requires different model radios. Different manufacturers have different ranges for each model.
BB
 

chief21

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These frequency ranges are typically known as "band splits". As noted earlier, some products do not cover the entire spectrum of a particular band and the product must be ordered for the appropriate band split. You often see this information on specification sheets.

John
 

RFFR

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Every body pretty much has given the correct answer. UHF1 is the low end, and UHF5 is the high end.
There's a little more information involving these labels.
And why did they omit UHF4?
Google will explain it in more detail.
No offense intended, but would it kill you to just link to a source? I googled extensively before deciding to post here. With the general attitude of people in these types of forums, I try to exhaust every other avenue before I decide to post in forums.
 
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