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what is Y-Split and J-Split and all the different splits mean?

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dgruber

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I hear different motorola radios have different splits like Y-Split and J-split. What do these mean?



Thanks!
 

Jay911

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The model number has a character typically in the 4th position that identifies the band the radio was built for.

There's a model number decoder chart on the web, but unfortunately I can't get you the link (I'm posting from my phone - my isp was struck by lightning on Thursday and blew up all their gear).

Here's the ones I can recall off the top of my head:

K - 136-174
R - 403-430
S - 450-470
U - 760-870

U will be 851-870 on older radios.

T is something like 470-520 as well.
 
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N4KVE

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For older VHF radios that didn't do the whole 136-174 split, the J split radios did the lower end, like 136-162 mhz, while K would have been 146-174. I've never heard of a Y split radio, but look forward to learning what that was.
 

mikewazowski

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Those are all guidelines only. Each model of radio will have a specific frequency range.

A Q split Spectra will be 403-430MHz while a Q split APX will do 380-470MHz.

A lot of radios were also RF module dependent. While you could tell the general frequency range of your radio by the model number, you would have to open it up to determine which part of that range it actually covered.

J/K = VHF
Q/R/S/T = UHF
U = 800MHz
 

KG4INW

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W is 900 MHz. However, Motorola didn't start using this scheme until sometime in the 90's. Before then, the band was indicated by the 3rd character and it was a number. E.g. 3 was VHF, 4 was UHF, 5 was 800 and 7 was 900, etc. The most irritating thing about the old radios though was that you couldn't tell a specific range, just whether it was high band, UHF, whatever.
 
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W is 900 MHz. However, Motorola didn't start using this scheme until sometime in the 90's. Before then, the band was indicated by the 3rd character and it was a number. E.g. 3 was VHF, 4 was UHF, 5 was 800 and 7 was 900, etc. The most irritating thing about the old radios though was that you couldn't tell a specific range, just whether it was high band, UHF, whatever.

Most of my stuff is on the number system. It really depends on the radios. The radius series stayed on the old numbering. Jedi and professional series tended to be on the alpha system. Spectras were on the numbers (some astro series may be alphas). GTX was on the numerical system.
 
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