What's a "PREP"?

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drdispatch

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What nd5y posted is a perfect example. Each of those columns is a zone, and each zone has the same number of channels (16 is typical). Think of it as the banks or systems in your scanner; the only difference is that a radio can only monitor one zone at a time. Each department has their own template which the vendor (at least initially) will program for them. In Michigan, agencies on the MPSCS have to follow certain guidelines; Zone A is reserved for MSP; Zones G, H, I, & J are for statewide event talkgroups; Zone F is for the national interoperability channels (8CALL90, etc). Most all of the other zones (primarily B, C, D, & E) can be programmed to the individual agency's needs.
 

MFD4305

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Thanks Again!

Thanks, both. I have to love the RadioReference Forums: a Texan sending info about OKC to a Michigander! Now if I can just get someone with insider MPSCS to post the template for Washtenaw County. . .
 

krokus

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Thanks, both. I have to love the RadioReference Forums: a Texan sending info about OKC to a Michigander! Now if I can just get someone with insider MPSCS to post the template for Washtenaw County. . .
There is no one template for Washtenaw. Each agency selects their own Zone A configuration, with the rest standardized by profession. (So the cops have one layout, the firefighters have another.)

St. Joe's Public Safety, UM DPS, Concordia DPS, road commission, and HVA (aka Emergent Health), all have leeway to setup how they want.

Sent via Tapatalk
 

Hooligan

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The story I heard back in the late 1970s was that "PREP" = Portable Radio Equipped Patrolman, and that the term originated with Detroit PD.

It's hard to believe after decades of negative history revolving around Detroit, but the city had a long history of utilizing modern radio technology for police use, including being one of the first US cities to put mediumwave receivers & then receiver-transmitters in the vehicles (base station dispatch callsign was...KOP), even moving off MW to shortwave, then back to MF, followed by VHF... Back in the early 1970s or maybe into the 1960s, their radio system was very sophisticated -- patrol officers had already been issued HT200 handheld transceivers, with LORAN-based AVLs in the patrol vehicles (using one or two VHF channels for polling) multi-site, voted UHF repeaters with a good quantity of channels for dispatch zones, Tac, Special Events, & MODATs (Mobile Data Terminals). Meanwhile, some special units also had VHF repeaters & simplex freqs for their use as well.
 

gpp10x

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A couple weeks back I watched a video on YouTube about Detroit Police called On The Way. It was made in the early 70's showing the process of receiving the phone call for help before 9-1-1. How the call taker took the information and passed it along to the dispatcher. They made mention of the PREP which as Hooligan said was Portable Radio Equipped Patrolman. I've tried to find the video again but haven't been able to find it.
 

N8DRC

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if I can just get someone with insider MPSCS to post the template for Washtenaw County. . .
I have one for county roads will give you an idea,
will hunt for it and send it your way in a couple days.
 

MLW1058

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"PREP" stands for Personal Radio Equipped Police. Refers to their portable radio and usually it's identifying number
 

traffic27fl

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RE:pREP

As I recall, The Detroit Police Department was the first public safety agency in southeast Michigan to put portable radios (Motorola HT 200s) on the street. It was around 1964 or 1965. Shortly after the introduction of the portables, the department took out a full page picture on the back page of the first section of the Detroit Free Press to publicize this improvement to officer efficiency and safety. The picture showed a motorcycle officer in full uniform including helmet and boots with his HT 200 in its holster hanging from his belt. The caption above his head across the top of the page in bold capital letters read: PORTABLE RADIO EQUIPPED POLICEMAN. This became an acronym in the department shortened to PREP. (I know this because I was in the first class of Reserve Police Officers Detroit put on the street in 1968, assigned to the 10th Precinct). As time went on, the term prep was gradually adopted by other police agencies in the area and by fire and ems agencies.
 

drdispatch

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Never too old to learn

As I recall, The Detroit Police Department was the first public safety agency in southeast Michigan to put portable radios (Motorola HT 200s) on the street. It was around 1964 or 1965. Shortly after the introduction of the portables, the department took out a full page picture on the back page of the first section of the Detroit Free Press to publicize this improvement to officer efficiency and safety. The picture showed a motorcycle officer in full uniform including helmet and boots with his HT 200 in its holster hanging from his belt. The caption above his head across the top of the page in bold capital letters read: PORTABLE RADIO EQUIPPED POLICEMAN. This became an acronym in the department shortened to PREP. (I know this because I was in the first class of Reserve Police Officers Detroit put on the street in 1968, assigned to the 10th Precinct). As time went on, the term prep was gradually adopted by other police agencies in the area and by fire and ems agencies.
Thanks, traffic27fl; I think you may have settled the debate once & for all. (You did for me, at least!) Just goes to show that no matter how long we've been around, there are still things to learn.
 

m297

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So the following zone's are mandated by the MPSCS E, F, G, H, I, J, these are generally NOT changed. All other zones are up to the individual user and or agency.



What nd5y posted is a perfect example. Each of those columns is a zone, and each zone has the same number of channels (16 is typical). Think of it as the banks or systems in your scanner; the only difference is that a radio can only monitor one zone at a time. Each department has their own template which the vendor (at least initially) will program for them. In Michigan, agencies on the MPSCS have to follow certain guidelines; Zone A is reserved for MSP; Zones G, H, I, & J are for statewide event talkgroups; Zone F is for the national interoperability channels (8CALL90, etc). Most all of the other zones (primarily B, C, D, & E) can be programmed to the individual agency's needs.
 

drdispatch

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So the following zone's are mandated by the MPSCS E, F, G, H, I, J, these are generally NOT changed. All other zones are up to the individual user and or agency.
Zone E contains the statewide talkgroups STATEW1, STATEW2, STATEW3, STATEW5, STATEW6, STATEW7, & STATEW8. This is same in all MPSCS radios.

Zone F contains the nationwide interop frequencies (analog) 8CALL90, 8TAC91, 8TAC92, 8TAC93, & 8TAC94. This is the same in all MPSCS radios.

Zones G and H contain statewide event talkgroups EVENT1 thru EVENT30. This is the same in all MPSCS radios.

Zones I and J contain statewide event talkgroups EVENT31 thru EVENT62, but they are only in law enforcement radios.

Everything else can be programmed as the user agency sees fit. We (Calhoun County) even have a Zone Q in our radios, which has fire talkgroups. I suppose you could have 26 zones programmed, but I don't see why you would need (or want) to.
 
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