What's up with the VHF/UHF?

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NewSDScanner

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I don't have a license yet but I do have some scanners and on my PSR-500, I've been listening to some hams. I programmed in the service search function for both 144-147MHz and 440-450MHz and my scanner keeps stopping on "noise" frequencies. In other words, every few seconds, it stops on a frequency where there is nobody talking but there's a bunch of noise. It's actually pretty annoying because this makes it so that I have to press my up or down arrow about 50 times before I find anyone actually talking.

Why is this and is there any more effective way to scan? I've also never found anyone talking on 144-147MHz but I have found about 6 conversations on the 440-450MHz band.

While on the subject, I know I'm jumping the gun a bit and I'm sure this info is in my ARRL Manual, but in this huge list of frequencies, how do hams find other new hams? I know some people hang out on normal repeaters, but is there another way?
 

WouffHong

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Jawjuh :)
"noise" Frequencies.

I don't have a license yet but I do have some scanners and on my PSR-500, I've been listening to some hams. I programmed in the service search function for both 144-147MHz and 440-450MHz and my scanner keeps stopping on "noise" frequencies. In other words, every few seconds, it stops on a frequency where there is nobody talking but there's a bunch of noise. It's actually pretty annoying because this makes it so that I have to press my up or down arrow about 50 times before I find anyone actually talking.

Why is this and is there any more effective way to scan? I've also never found anyone talking on 144-147MHz but I have found about 6 conversations on the 440-450MHz band.

While on the subject, I know I'm jumping the gun a bit and I'm sure this info is in my ARRL Manual, but in this huge list of frequencies, how do hams find other new hams? I know some people hang out on normal repeaters, but is there another way?
I strongly suspect you are landing on what is called "D-STAR" repeaters or simplex operations. It's a digital mode used by many hams and being proprietary, cannot be decoded without special receivers or a so-called "Dongle" interface.

Repeaters are often run by Clubs or interest groups and can be "open" or "closed" at the will of the owner(s) - Most, but NOT ALL hams, will recognize a newbie checking in, and answer with help or conversation, but in Metropolitan areas, they frequently are lax in doing so, from my own experience as a ham for over 55 years. - Sure has changed in the last 10 years or more. :-( :roll:

You might program in 146.52, 146.535, 146.55, 146.655, 146.580 MHz for local non-repeated (simplex) chatter.

Tom
 

k9rzz

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The 440 band may be simply more active in your area than the 146 Mhz band. It may vary depending on where you live. Regular users will always notice a new voice on their home machine, and usually welcome you. Here in Milwaukee, the 146.91 repeater has 'responders' that take a 3 hour shift during the day and their job is to talk to anyone that may pop in. For that reason, I think, it's called "91 - the friendly one", and they do have a family sort of atmosphere. Good luck with everything.
 

zz0468

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Keep in mind that scanners are much more susceptible to overload, birdies, and other artifacts that cause them to receive much more noise than is really 'out there'. They're also not as sensitive, so you may be in a weak signal area for a lot of activity, and are just missing it.

Hams can find other hams by joining local clubs, carefully listening in to whatever activity can be heard, and figuring out where it's coming from based on what people talk about.
 
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W2NJS

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By any chance when you're listening are you also running a computer in the same room? CPUs are a well-known source of low-level RF, including the ham bands. Other household devices also emit radio frequencies, though again these are at a low level. Next time you encounter a "noise" channel try shutting your computer off to see if the noise stops.
 
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