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What's wrong with two-way radios, scanners, computer forensics, and Linux?

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RedPenguin

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For as long as I have had scanners, I've loved two-way radios. I just find them really cool. I mean because, while they may not have the range that a cell phone has, they are not really that bad for the price, I mean you get, whatever a normal license is these days, and it seems like the license is normally for 10 years.

As some of you already know from my other posts, I go to college, and what I've learned, I'm amazed. College always seemed to me like it probably had people who didn't know everything but were all almost experts in various fields. Yet college seems like the other people I've talked to.

It seems like no one is in two-way radios nor scanners, even though they are used to help protect their lives, no one seems to be in to computer forensics (we have 3 people in the class now) and almost no one seems to be in to Linux.

I guess that I'm just amazed, because even in college, it's like no one cares to learn or try new things. I swear, when I talk about Linux, radio scanners, and two-way radios to people who are "tech geeks", they have no clue as to what I'm talking about. I find it funny, I know people who love to hack, yet they don't go for the computer forensic program. Uhh, you do investigating and find dirt in computer forensics. You definitely will do more hacking with comp forensics then you ever will with Network Admin or Telecom, which all of these people seem to be in, instead of comp forensics.

See I love the radio scanning hobby, but also Linux and computer forensics, to me they can easily all work together. You could be a computer forensic guy working with Linux using a two-way radio. LoL.

Many of you are two-way radio "geeks" and radio scanner "geeks", why does it seem that the hobby/job doesn't seem appealing? To me it's fascinating. Any one here do computer forensics or work with Linux?

EDIT: I live in Cambria County, PA, but I don't think the region really matters when it comes to the hobby, but perhaps if I lived in a big area like NYC or LA, I would run in to tons of people who are in the hobby.

Also, on a side note, slightly off topic, I was surprised, I thought college would be kinda more-dedicated, wanting to learn types of people, I don't mean completely enthusiastic people, but they remind me of High School people, it's like they all just act depressed and in a bad-mood and many seem to have an attitude. I'm not saying all or trying to bash college students, I'm just stating what I seem to run in to. I always thought computer/tech people enjoyed their work, but they act more like they hate it.
 
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RC54730

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RedPenguin said:
For as long as I have had scanners, I've loved two-way radios. I just find them really cool. I mean because, while they may not have the range that a cell phone has, they are not really that bad for the price, I mean you get, whatever a normal license is these days, and it seems like the license is normally for 10 years.

As some of you already know from my other posts, I go to college, and what I've learned, I'm amazed. College always seemed to me like it probably had people who didn't know everything but were all almost experts in various fields. Yet college seems like the other people I've talked to.

It seems like no one is in two-way radios nor scanners, even though they are used to help protect their lives, no one seems to be in to computer forensics (we have 3 people in the class now) and almost no one seems to be in to Linux.
Well, it sort of depends on the crowd, but in terms of the two-way radio / Ham radio scene, it's easy to see that dying off. I got my ticket something like 15 years ago, and only then because I was looking for emergency comms when I was in the outdoors - I didn't really care about radio technology, whatever. These days, with all the cell-phones, internet, blackberries, etc. it's easy to see why younger people aren't all that interested in Ham radio. I've driven across country a few times in the last couple of years, with my Yaesu radio in the car on 146.52 and never heard a peep from anyone. I've decided to leave serious ham units out of my rally cars these days, because it's a waste of space. If you even consider the original reason that I got one - outdoor emergency use - it's not a good idea, considering how inexpensive a reliable satellite phone is today; I'd rather place a direct call to a friend, or the ranger station!

I guess that I'm just amazed, because even in college, it's like no one cares to learn or try new things. I swear, when I talk about Linux, radio scanners, and two-way radios to people who are "tech geeks", they have no clue as to what I'm talking about. I find it funny, I know people who love to hack, yet they don't go for the computer forensic program. Uhh, you do investigating and find dirt in computer forensics. You definitely will do more hacking with comp forensics then you ever will with Network Admin or Telecom, which all of these people seem to be in, instead of comp forensics.
Well, that's kind of a sweeping generalization. If you want to meet people with similar interests, ala forensics, etc. go attend BlackHat or something some day. There's no shortage of brilliant people in the space, and many of them participate in online discussion groups, lists, yada yada.

Many of you are two-way radio "geeks" and radio scanner "geeks", why does it seem that the hobby/job doesn't seem appealing? To me it's fascinating. Any one here do computer forensics or work with Linux?
I used to do a lot of computer security work, but I eventually decided to trade an exciting job that paid very little money, for an exciting job that paid a lot of money. You'll find that computer security is still very underappreciated in this world, and although the work is tremendously challenging, and often very exciting, the actual pay is pretty low; a lot of the really interesting work is in the defense community, but the combination of low salary and bureaucratic bull**** isn't for everyone.

EDIT: I live in Cambria County, PA, but I don't think the region really matters when it comes to the hobby, but perhaps if I lived in a big area like NYC or LA, I would run in to tons of people who are in the hobby.
Hey, you're already here on the 'net - the great geographic equalizer. If you're seriously developing an interest in forensics and REAL computer security work, well, try taking a trip to BlackHat or DefCon one of these years and you'll have a lot of fun. There are plenty of books on the subject to, checkout Matt Bishop's book "Computer Security" for a good broad introduction to lots of real computer security stuff. There's a kind of off-the-wall book, called "Silence On The Wire" by Michal Zalewsky that makes good reading as well.

Anyway, there's tons of literature, and lots and lots of people on the net to chat with, so just get out there and start talking with folks!
 

DaveNF2G

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To respond first to the comments about the college environment - I think it depends on both the institution and the locality. Two-year colleges here in New York tend to attract the "13th graders" who aren't really prepared for learning because they were never taught adequately up to 12th grade. There are some excellent students in some of my classes, but their numbers seem to be dwindling.

As for Linux - I have a desktop that dual boots KUbuntu Linux and MS-DOS. I dabble.

I have also noted the prevalence of "appliance operators" in ham radio. While some hams (who seem to work in experimental labs like Bell) are still at the cutting edge of radio technology, most of the ones I know are only aware of what ham radios do and what is going on within their bands. Many use Windows 95 at best and maybe 14.4 modems (if they've upgraded from 1200 or 9600 recently). I am often amazed at how far some hams are behind the tech curve.
 

brutalpilot514

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Most of the Hams around here in my area are very much with the tech curve and actually in some ways ahead of the average person. I know during storms those of us that aren't actually out spotting have some of the high speed radar imagery and can see everything from the hail indicators to the tornado indicators, tracking, etc. Basically the really nice stuff. And you know as well as I do that takes broadband speeds.
 

slicerwizard

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RedPenguin said:
I swear, when I talk about Linux, radio scanners, and two-way radios to people who are "tech geeks", they have no clue as to what I'm talking about.
And undoubtably, there are tech subjects that you know next to nothing about. Nothing unusual about that. BTW, I see you consider yourself to be a geeky geek; as has been suggested, go to BlackHat or DefCon and see what real geeks are like.


I find it funny, I know people who love to hack, yet they don't go for the computer forensic program. Uhh, you do investigating and find dirt in computer forensics. You definitely will do more hacking with comp forensics then you ever will with Network Admin or Telecom
No, you won't. You'll muck around with programs like EnCase. The others will solve real-world, real-time problems, interact with users, build solutions, etc., etc.


I was surprised, I thought college would be kinda more-dedicated, wanting to learn types of people, I don't mean completely enthusiastic people, but they remind me of High School people
Yeah, that's where they came from.
 

RedPenguin

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Computer Forensics = Bad?

What's always so bad with computer forensics?

I never seen them as people that were not needed. Any time you watch shows or see things in real life, computer investigators can often extremely help out law-enforcement on a case.

Computers seemed to be used for so many crimes today, that it's unbelievable.

Yet, not many seem to care about computer investigators, yet then again, many seem not to even care about any type of law-enforcement like police, FBI, CIA, or any other law-enforcement agency.

I constantly hear how in NYC, the police have a huge and hard job to do, yet they are among the least paid. Yet, they can get shot or hurt at any second. Sometimes just because they wear a uniform, that many people hate.

Actually, I will eventually be in all of the programs. I'm currently in computer forensics but I will eventually be in Network Admin and Telecomm.

Maybe I have feelings that no one else here has, but I just see police, any type of investigator (homicide, arson, computer, etc), and other law-enforcement, all as necessary that need to be paid more and not treated like human garbage.

Now, I'm not saying that anyone is perfect or that any law-enforcement agent is free of mistakes, but that they deserve to be treated better than they do now. In my area, an habitual criminal will get more respect than any type of LEO.

My flat out statement from what I witnessed in my life, if you sell drugs, you're loved and protected and have tons of people hanging around you and upset if you get arrested or busted, yet if you arrest people for drugs or do traffic stops (police officer), you will be a pig, flat foot, the heat, fuzz, part of the establishment, Five-O, and so many other wonderful names.

Just a fair amount of words for anyone and everyone to swallow.
 

zz0468

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RedPenguin said:
For as long as I have had scanners, I've loved two-way radios. I just find them really cool. I mean because, while they may not have the range that a cell phone has, they are not really that bad for the price, I mean you get, whatever a normal license is these days, and it seems like the license is normally for 10 years.
Scanners? Licenses? I'm assuming you're referring to a ham license, which has nothing to do with scanning. They're related branches of the same hobby, obviously, but the connection makes it unclear what your point is.

RedPenguin said:
It seems like no one is in two-way radios nor scanners, even though they are used to help protect their lives, no one seems to be in to computer forensics (we have 3 people in the class now) and almost no one seems to be in to Linux.
I don't think you're running in the right circles. Both radio and computer forensics are specialized niche fields, far from mainstream interest. But I have no shortage of people interested in radio to associate with. As to computer forensics, that's even more specialized, so finding someone nearby who share s your interest might be challenging.

RedPenguin said:
I guess that I'm just amazed, because even in college, it's like no one cares to learn or try new things. I swear, when I talk about Linux, radio scanners, and two-way radios to people who are "tech geeks", they have no clue as to what I'm talking about. I find it funny, I know people who love to hack, yet they don't go for the computer forensic program. Uhh, you do investigating and find dirt in computer forensics. You definitely will do more hacking with comp forensics then you ever will with Network Admin or Telecom, which all of these people seem to be in, instead of comp forensics.
I think the preception that no one cares to learn new things has been with us since time out of mind. But it's only partially true. There are people doing cutting edge research all over the world. As I said before, radio is a specialized field of interest, even more so than it used to be, so it seems like there are fewer people interested. Translate that to more opportunity for you - there's less competition if there are few people interested.

RedPenguin said:
See I love the radio scanning hobby, but also Linux and computer forensics, to me they can easily all work together. You could be a computer forensic guy working with Linux using a two-way radio. LoL.
Ok, that's a bit of a stretch combining two different disiplines that you enjoy.

RedPenguin said:
Many of you are two-way radio "geeks" and radio scanner "geeks", why does it seem that the hobby/job doesn't seem appealing? To me it's fascinating. Any one here do computer forensics or work with Linux?
I enjoy it and feel it's very appealing. I'm quite ok if most other people don't like it, though. I don't want EVERYONE to be interested in radio. That would ruin it for me.

RedPenguin said:
EDIT: I live in Cambria County, PA, but I don't think the region really matters when it comes to the hobby, but perhaps if I lived in a big area like NYC or LA, I would run in to tons of people who are in the hobby.
I think it DOES matter where you live. There are various pockets of technological interest in various parts of the country. In California, where I'm located, it's a hotbed of some very advanced amateur radio operations which includes lots of microwave activity, moonbounce, very large linked repeater systems, and amateur stations that rival a comercial broadcast station in installation quality, and NASA in the technologies used. Some of us even use rubidium vapor oscillators to stabilize the frequency of our radios. I imagine that in an older historic part of the country, interest in high technology could very well be less than in other parts of the country. You may consider moving to a part of the country that supports your interests more.

RedPenguin said:
Also, on a side note, slightly off topic, I was surprised, I thought college would be kinda more-dedicated, wanting to learn types of people, I don't mean completely enthusiastic people, but they remind me of High School people, it's like they all just act depressed and in a bad-mood and many seem to have an attitude. I'm not saying all or trying to bash college students, I'm just stating what I seem to run in to. I always thought computer/tech people enjoyed their work, but they act more like they hate it.
They probably DO hate it. Are you going to a community college? They are frequently just an extension of high school for some people. You want to surround yourself with more people interested in the things you are? Pick a school that suits your needs better. There are a dozen schools in a 30 mile radios of me, for example, that have their own FM and television broadcast stations, and the class cirruculum to support them. I mean REAL radio stations, not some cheesy internet webcast.

It sounds to me like maybe your interests fall outside the realm of the people who surround you, and maybe it's time to think about finding a better place to be. Good luck!
 

Zaratsu

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RedPenguin said:
Also, on a side note, slightly off topic, I was surprised, I thought college would be kinda more-dedicated, wanting to learn types of people, I don't mean completely enthusiastic people, but they remind me of High School people, it's like they all just act depressed and in a bad-mood and many seem to have an attitude. I'm not saying all or trying to bash college students, I'm just stating what I seem to run in to. I always thought computer/tech people enjoyed their work, but they act more like they hate it.

I blame Myspace. Everyone has their own little "soap opera" now and nobody is watching but themselves.:roll:

Linux isnt embraced because of business use. The most "academic" method is not necisarrily the most practical or useful in the real world.

Ham and scanners are a hobby. Cell phones are not. Most people leave their hobbies to their own time and place. Most hobbies are "weird." so get over it and leave the HT at home when you hang out with others.

Now go run and do a kegstand to impress the ladies. There is a time and a place for everything, and that place is COLLEGE:D :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :D :cool:

Maybe join a Frat? Maybe the Tri-delts are pledging?

http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/imgs/070607/worstsequels/nerds_l.jpg
 
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RedPenguin

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zz0468 said:
Scanners? Licenses? I'm assuming you're referring to a ham license, which has nothing to do with scanning. They're related branches of the same hobby, obviously, but the connection makes it unclear what your point is.
Sorry in that case, I meant like a business license, but a ham license would work also to a point.

I mean, if you're running a business, it's not like two-way radios suck 100% compared to cell phones, and I meant that law enforcement use them all the time, and I would think they would need someone to program their radios.

A radio programmer for the police, I would assume would be kinda an important guy, because if law enforcement can't communicate, I don't even want to tell you what can happen.
 
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