Why Aren't CB Radio Frequencies Added To The DB?

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wa8pyr

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I mean my submission of frequencies used by landfills in Lackawanna County Pennsylvania.

So what if CB is below 30mhz? Why is AM not cool if it is below 30mhz?
It's not that AM isn't cool or that it's below 30 MHz; specific CB listings are not allowed in order to prevent inaccuracy on the user side.

The issue with CB is that it's a nationwide pool of unlicensed frequencies available to anyone or their uncle who trots down to the local discount emporium and buys a CB radio. While it's true that the local landfill can use a CB channel to direct truck movements, the warehouse down the road could use the same channel for another purpose, as could anyone else with a CB radio. Add skip into the equation and what you end up with is a database entry popping up on someone's radio saying that it's the local landfill, when in fact it's Joe's Trucking 100 miles away.

Air-band frequencies are relatively short-range and are specifically assigned to avoid operational conflicts; everybody and their brother can't just start using them like they can with CB. Other nationwide frequencies must be licensed by every local user, or serve very specifically designated user groups. If these nationwide frequencies are used at the local level with a squelch that varies from the national standard, they can then be added to the county- or state-level database due to that difference, as they won't conflict with the national standard already listed in the database.

Hopefully that clears it up for you. If you simply must have them listed somewhere, the Wiki for your county is excellent for that purpose.
 
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KC3ECJ

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It's not that AM isn't cool or that it's below 30 MHz; specific CB listings are not allowed in order to prevent inaccuracy on the user side.

The issue with CB is that it's a nationwide pool of unlicensed frequencies available to anyone or their uncle who trots down to the local discount emporium and buys a CB radio. While it's true that the local landfill can use a CB channel to direct truck movements, the warehouse down the road could use the same channel for another purpose, as could anyone else with a CB radio. Add skip into the equation and what you end up with is a database entry popping up on someone's radio saying that it's the local landfill, when in fact it's Joe's Trucking 100 miles away.

Air-band frequencies are relatively short-range and are specifically assigned to avoid operational conflicts; everybody and their brother can't just start using them like they can with CB. Other nationwide frequencies must be licensed by every local user, or serve very specifically designated user groups. If these nationwide frequencies are used at the local level with a squelch that varies from the national standard, they can then be added to the county- or state-level database due to that difference, as they won't conflict with the national standard already listed in the database.

Hopefully that clears it up for you.
But as I have stated, there are entries for MURS and FRS. With or without a tone.
CB now allows for FM anyways, and there are long threads on this site devoted to low band propagation of government or business entities.

Air band short range?
While the watts of the radios are usually low, a plane high up can be received a long ways.
 
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