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Wide band spacing for VHF HT-1250

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PCTEK

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I have an HT-1250. I've set it to use a 25khz wideband channel spacing. When I did a radio test during an evening 2m Repeater net check-in, I was readable but was told I had some "scratchy-ness". The FCC data base shows these 2m frequencies to have a 20khz spacing. Should I change the spacing on my HT1250 to 20khz? Thanks
 

900mhz

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I have an HT-1250. I've set it to use a 25khz wideband channel spacing. When I did a radio test during an evening 2m Repeater net check-in, I was readable but was told I had some "scratchy-ness". The FCC data base shows these 2m frequencies to have a 20khz spacing. Should I change the spacing on my HT1250 to 20khz? Thanks
sounds to me your issue is with signal strength into the repeater receiver, or receivers, if its a voted system, not channel spacing.
 

mmckenna

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Yeah, I agree, sounds like an RF issue. If you are using a handheld into a repeater, there can be a lot of issues with low signal strength.

The "25KHz wideband channels spacing" that you are referring to on the HT-1250 has to do with the RF deviation, or how much space your transmitted signal uses. 25KHz / 5KHz deviation is pretty much the defacto standard for FM amateur radio in VHF, UHF analog.

Setting it to 20KHz / 4KHz deviation is going to make your recovered audio worse. Less deviation will sound quieter on the traditionally wide band radios that most amateurs are using.

The 20KHz channel spacing is the space between channel centers. It varies by location. The ARRL repeater guide used to include a map of the USA and showed the common channel spacing used by individual states. Here where I am, 15KHz is more common between channels:
146.415MHz, 146.430MHz, 146.450MHz, etc.
 

mmckenna

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I am using a standard 2m repeater (146.805) 25Khz spacing. I don't think our repeater is narrow band..
I would be very surprised if it was narrow band. Hams have been slow to embrace it, as there is really no need to go narrow.

Try using your radio from another location. Hand held radios with rubber ducky type antennas will usually perform poorly into a repeater unless you are really close or it's a really good repeater. If you are in a bad location, like inside your home, that's going to make the issue worse.
 

900mhz

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I would also verify the frequency range of the portable antenna...an antenna cut for 155 MHz will not perform as well as one tuned for the ham band (144-148MHz).
 
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