• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Wiring Question

Status
Not open for further replies.

josh5629

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
5
Location
Monongahela, PA
I have several accessories wired directly to my battery. I have seen fuse blocks on other sites, but I don't know much about them. How exactly do I wire one? Do I wire my accessories to the fuse block, then wire the fuse block to my battery? Any info or links would be appreciated. Thank you.
 

SCPD

QRT
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
0
Location
Virginia
fuse box

1st of all, how many wires do you have hooked to the battery, & what size are the wires & what are the devices the wires are for ?
 

josh5629

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
5
Location
Monongahela, PA
Right now I have 3 devices wired to the battery, A mini light bar with a 10 gauge wire, a siren with a 14 gauge wire, and a switch box with a 14 gauge wire. I do plan on adding another accessory or 2. The wires are all for power.
 

ofd8001

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
7,193
Location
Louisville, KY
Yes that's the basic principle, wiring the fuse block to the positive side of the battery. That's so you don't have so many wires connecting to the battery terminal.

You may wish to consider some type of over-current protection (either a fuse or circuit breaker) for the wire from your battery to the fuse block. Also, depening upon whether you want the things that are fed by the fuse block to be constant hot or on the ignition, some type of relay/solenoid may be useful.

The size of the wire to the fuse block is highly dependent upon the things the fuse block is expected to power.

Hopefully you will be able to locate the fuse block manufacturer's installation recommendations for installation and capacities.
 

ofd8001

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
7,193
Location
Louisville, KY
The following link goes to a chart which shows the current carrying capacity of automotive wires:

Wire Gauge Amps Ratings for 12 volt Automotive Systems

The size of the wire from the battery to the fuse block should coincide with the lesser of these two things: The total amp rating of the fuse block or the sum of the draw of all devices that are fed by the fuse block. As a reminder there should be overcurrent protection for the wire(s) going from the battery to the fuse block, even if the wire run is short.

It appears your set-up is quite similar to what I've seen installed on firefighter personal vehicles (we can run emergency equipment in Kentucky) and a number of fire department service vehicles.

Something to toss out for consideration: You might want somethings being constant hot, other keys hot only when the ignition is on. In that case, two fuse blocks would do the trick, one hot and one ignition.
 

josh5629

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
5
Location
Monongahela, PA
Thank You For All The Help.

Ofd, I Do Want A Few Of The Accessories To Only Be Hot When The ignition Is On. Where Would I Wire That Fuse Block To?

Sorry For All Caps, When I Post From My Phone, This Is What Happens.
 

scottyhetzel

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
1,409
Location
Palm Springs Area / OrCo
Go to bluesea dot com check out the guides for proper wiring, many retro fitters use this prododucts and order the best fuse block on the market. Nickel plated copper, custom labels. Clear cover for fuses, holds spares...
 

n5ims

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2004
Messages
3,859
Thank You For All The Help.

Ofd, I Do Want A Few Of The Accessories To Only Be Hot When The ignition Is On. Where Would I Wire That Fuse Block To?

Sorry For All Caps, When I Post From My Phone, This Is What Happens.
You should probably wire a relay up to the connection for the ignition (generally this is in your fuse box, consult the documentation provided in an earlier link for exactly where) and use the relay to switch from your new fuse block (battery to fuse block to relay to accessory). That way you won't overload your ignition switch and associated circuitry. Ignition power is often only a few amps at best, while lights, radios, sirens, etc. may draw many more amps. The relay will only draw a small amount of power itself, but the contacts it controls can power much much more. Just make sure that your relay is rated to handle at least as much power as you'll ever need to draw. You should also make sure that it's designed to be mounted where you will put it (e.g. if installed under the hood, make sure it's waterproof, will handle the heat, oil, etc.).
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top