Yellowstone National Park - 2020 freqs

zerg901

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from a 2020 federal document from WY

seems to be pretty much the same as the RRDB

Lamar - Direct - 166.375 - mobiles RX and TX PL 192.8

Lamar - 166.375 R - PL 192.8 - 166.975 in

North - Direct - 166.325 - mobiles RX and TX PL 167.9

North - Washburn - 166.325 R - PL 167.9 - 166.925 input

South - Direct - 165.5875 - mobiles RX and TX PL 110.9

South - Sheridan - 165.5875 R - PL 110.9 - 164.80 input

South - Topnotch - 165.5875 R - PL 118.8 - 164.80 input

Fire Cache Ops (Flight Following) - 172.50 - mobiles RX and TX PL 103.5

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The 'direct' channels are not explicitly listed in RRDB

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The RR Wiki says that Sheridan and Topnotch are patched together 24/7 - which seems odd - 2 repeaters on the same freq transmitting different PLs - will that really work? - maybe, the area that is halfway between the 2 repeaters, is an area where no one ever goes
 

kayn1n32008

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The RR Wiki says that Sheridan and Topnotch are patched together 24/7 - which seems odd - 2 repeaters on the same freq transmitting different PLs - will that really work? - maybe, the area that is halfway between the 2 repeaters, is an area where no one ever goes
Or there is a mountain/terrain in between the two repeaters that keeps the RF from over lapping. ..
 

Paysonscanner

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Why no P25 they should have gone Digital years ago
I would say funding is the primary reason. They haven't even been able to comply with the 2019 NTIA allocation yet. We've noticed that some national parks are replacing their entire system when they change to new frequencies. Often times they will install a multicast system that trasmits the incoming signal of any one of the repeaters on all the other repeaters, each having a different output frequency. Sometimes the system is simple and users have to choose a tone to get the repeater they thing will work the best. In some locations they have a single input freq for all the repeaters, which are linked and have a voter. The repeater with the best signal then transmits the mobile to the other repeaters. By doing this the users just keep it on one channel, with no tone to select and the system automatically uses the best signal. Just like trunking, if someone is in a vehicle and starts to lose one repeater, it switches the reception to the repeater with the best signal.

As for P25, this is problematic in mountainous territory. All the natural resource agencies had to add repeaters due to coverage loses when the 12.5 kHz radios were put in place. Now adding P25 to the mix will likely cause a need for more repeaters. Digital may work well in the big city, the midwest and most areas in the eastern U.S., but in mountainous rural areas it can really stinks. By the way, did you know that the National Park System has a $4-5 BILLION maintenance backlog? How do you think installing the latest radio technology stacks up to these needs? Radio systems are a part of it, but if the system is NTIA 2005 and 2019 compliant and analog, works for them, who really cares about the latest/greatest? Meanwhile some of their seasonal staff is living in 100 year old housing that should be condemned in many cases, platform tents and using water systems that break down frequently due to the age of the system. They may have a major road for a park using a bridge that has been band-aided and fixed with bubble gum for years. How does that stack up with digital? The national parks haven't had a major input of funding for facilities since the "Mission 66" program, which was started 10 years prior to be in place when the NPS turned 50 in 1966. Now 50 years later it going to need a similar effort. A bill is going through the Congress right now that is meant to start addressing the situation and this time the U.S. Forest Service is included, that have a similar or greater backlog. As a frequent public lands user I'm not at all interested in whether they can switch to digital or not, as long as they can talk to each other from nearly everywhere in the park. I'm a retired registered nurse, who hiked and ran rivers in a lot of remote places, got involved in more backcountry medical incidents than I would have liked to, I know that coverage is essential, not necessarily what tool is used to do so.
 
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