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suggestions for 1st time base antena setup

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car2back

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Hi everyone, I just moved into a new house and am getting ready to try my 1st base antenna setup. I did a mobile install on my '91 camaro not too long ago and did a pretty good job, IMHO.

Anyways, I am looking for any good advice from the pro's and old hands on here before I get started, I still haven't decided on whether I want to go with one wide band antenna or two band specific ones (VHF and 800mhz). I would like to be able to run 2 radios, one VHF and one on 800 Trunked.

thanks ahead for any help.
 

bonus1331

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The link for the website is impressive!
Quoting the 785 and 250D's as NEW!!!!
Heck, their selling 245's for $239!!!!
This website must be an archive of days gone by!!!
AG4WI said:
I think it is always better to have a antenna for a specific band but there are very good antenna that will do good on both bands and you don't have 2 Coax runs and the extra wind load on the mast! Check out this site and look at all the differant ones that will do both bands.

http://www.rfwiz.com/AustinAntenna/AustinAntenna_InfoDat.htm
 

kf4lne

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Stormchaser_35 said:
also Ground the antenna well, I use a copper 8' grounding rod
It may be a good idea to tie that ground into the building ground as well, it helps cut down on voltage differences between grounds and in the unlikely event of a lightning strike it helps to ensure there is a solid path to ground. Use good quality connector seal to keep your connectors water tight, use a good quality corrosion inhibitor on your ground connections and use a large guage wire for ground, such as #8 solid copper. keep your ground connections as short as you can, use "drip loops" where the coax enters the house, this keeps water from running down the coax and into the wall. Caulk the hole where the coax enters and if you can angle your entry hole up, this also helps keep water from getting inside the wal in case of a leak. Don't be tempted to use plumbing strap or some other flexible strap to mount the pole to the wall, use solid, galvanized steel brackets designed for that use. If you want to save a few dollars on mast poles and are going to be using a light weight antenna you can get chain link fence top rails for about half the cost of antenna mast. These are not suitable for tall masts or heavy or high wind load antennas. Be sure to use rust resistant hardware, stainless or galvanized steel. DO NOT substitute heavy duty lag bolts with wood screws, use the large lag bolts included with your mounting hardware. I have seen far too many antennas installed using sheetrock screws in place of more suited hardware that have came down in the wind. Zip ties are not suitable for attaching coax because the zip ties can crush the coax if pulled too tightly. Use a more flexiable strap to attach the coax to the mast and leave some slack at the antenna to allow for thermal exspansion and other movement that may occur. its also a good idea to install a discharge tube type grounding point at the base of the mast to discharge any static buildup or energy bleedoff from lightning strikes and such. just as a safety precaution, if you use more than one section of mast pole it may be a good idea to drill a small hole at the joint and put a bolt thru the joint to keep the poles together. I have seen gusts of wind pull mast pole sections apart because the antenna on top made a great sail. I am sure there is more, and if I can think of anything else i will add to it.
 

wilbilt

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kf4lne said:
It may be a good idea to tie that ground into the building ground as well, it helps cut down on voltage differences between grounds and in the unlikely event of a lightning strike it helps to ensure there is a solid path to ground.
To add to that, the National Electric Code requires all ground rods be bonded together with minimum #6 AWG copper.

This can get expensive if your mast ground is located a good distance from the main service ground, but insures that all grounds are at the same potential for the above stated reasons.
 

kf4lne

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Also ground the equipment inside too. basically, ground EVERYTHING. the more places that lightning and static have to go into the dirt means it is less likeley to go into your radios and/or operator.
 
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