Cameron Peak Fire

crazy88

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2014
Messages
48
Location
Colorado
Anyone else monitoring this fire?

I am only scanning DTRS, the talkgroups that seem active up there are:
TG 4006 NE MAC 7 - Northeast
TG 9157 Larimer County Fire
TG 2354 DOW Fort Collins
TG 2497 CDOT 1 King

There doesn't seem to be much air traffic, except for some fire mapping planes. Any other frequencies that are active?
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Hello crazy88, yes state MAC7 is heavily in use, some MAC6
You may be interested to know the old LCSO VHF channel 4 firenet is being used for this incident. As well as EMS North vhf.
LC EMS and LC SAR talkgroups on DTRS alternate between the incident and other incidents as needed.
You'll find some of the air traffic on National Interagency Fire Center frequencies
 

aprswatcher

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 22, 2007
Messages
590
Location
Lewistown, Montana
For aircraft traffic start with the air attack frequencies and listen for them to give other frequencies.
Cameron Pk 125.725 am
Williams 119.45 am

If your close to one of the air tanker bases monitor 123.975 am.
73, Rex
 

RMason

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Sep 18, 2003
Messages
25
I have logged activity on:

FrequencyMod.Channel
168.7250NFMColorado Federal - United States Forest Service - Pike & San Isabel National Forest - Pike Net - Front Range Repeater
169.9750NFMForest Service - Roosevelt/Arapaho National Forests & Pawnee National Grasslands - USFS Roosevelt
173.0375NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Command - NIRSC Command 12
163.1000NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 12
166.7250NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 5
169.1500NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 8
168.4000NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Air Tac5
122.9000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC All Com
121.5000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC ELT
168.6500NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Nat FF
122.9750AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 2
123.0250AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 4
417.7875NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Logistics - NIFC Logs 3TA
167.1375NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Tactical - NIFC IntraCrew 2
125.7250AM
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
I have logged activity on:

FrequencyMod.Channel
168.7250NFMColorado Federal - United States Forest Service - Pike & San Isabel National Forest - Pike Net - Front Range Repeater
169.9750NFMForest Service - Roosevelt/Arapaho National Forests & Pawnee National Grasslands - USFS Roosevelt
173.0375NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Command - NIRSC Command 12
163.1000NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 12
166.7250NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 5
169.1500NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 8
168.4000NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Air Tac5
122.9000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC All Com
121.5000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC ELT
168.6500NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Nat FF
122.9750AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 2
123.0250AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 4
417.7875NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Logistics - NIFC Logs 3TA
167.1375NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Tactical - NIFC IntraCrew 2
125.7250AM
170.4125 is operating as the main IC channel, channel referred to as "Cameron Communications".

There's a few others I hear not on your list, unless you are strictly interested in Aircraft, in which case apologies. I'll add my list after work tonight if I get a chance.
 

Paysonscanner

Active Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
636
Location
Gila (He la) Co AZ
I have logged activity on:

FrequencyMod.Channel
168.7250NFMColorado Federal - United States Forest Service - Pike & San Isabel National Forest - Pike Net - Front Range Repeater
169.9750NFMForest Service - Roosevelt/Arapaho National Forests & Pawnee National Grasslands - USFS Roosevelt
173.0375NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Command - NIRSC Command 12
163.1000NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 12
166.7250NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 5
169.1500NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 8
168.4000NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Air Tac5
122.9000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC All Com
121.5000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC ELT
168.6500NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Nat FF
122.9750AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 2
123.0250AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 4
417.7875NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Logistics - NIFC Logs 3TA
167.1375NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Tactical - NIFC IntraCrew 2
125.7250AM
Some comments about what is shown as NIRSC Tac 12. This is used for "deck" uses on fires, at incident heliports and air tanker bases. Coordination of landing in specific spot, lineup for retardant refill and assignments for parking aprons is done on these frequencies.

What is shown as NIRSC Tac 8, is actually National Air Tactics 3. The database is showing Tacs 8-12 and the official NIFC document only lists Tacs 1-3 and 5-7. I might make a submission and try to get the database more in line with what the NIFC document shows as far as the freq assignments for the NIRSC. They seem reluctant to change.

Logistics frequencies are not used by the people on the ground actually suppressing the fire. This frequency is the input for NIFC Logistics Repeater 3. The repeater output should be 9 megs lower or 408.7875. Sometimes though, they reverse these for what reason we have no idea. Logistics radio traffic involves the support people on a fire, such as supplies, food service, fleet maintenance, shower units, etc. NIFC logistics repeaters are set up near an incident base or incident command post. Sometimes a receiving/distribution facility is set up to serve more than one incident and located at an airport. The system is also capable of using 417.7875 simplex. You are correct showing it a Logistic 3 talk around. You shouldn't hear the term "talk around" on a federal incident as the standard terminology for simplex is "direct."

It would be interesting if you could note what CTCSS tones you are hearing on 167.1375. Each hotshot crew has been given a channel and tone assignment. A list of these assignments is not to be found - YET. We will try to find it, but it is likely not available on the internet.
 

Paysonscanner

Active Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
636
Location
Gila (He la) Co AZ
I have logged activity on:

FrequencyMod.Channel
168.7250NFMColorado Federal - United States Forest Service - Pike & San Isabel National Forest - Pike Net - Front Range Repeater
169.9750NFMForest Service - Roosevelt/Arapaho National Forests & Pawnee National Grasslands - USFS Roosevelt
173.0375NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Command - NIRSC Command 12
163.1000NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 12
166.7250NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 5
169.1500NFMNational Incident Radio Support Cache - Tactical - NIRSC Tac 8
168.4000NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Air Tac5
122.9000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC All Com
121.5000AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC ELT
168.6500NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Air Command - NIFC Nat FF
122.9750AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 2
123.0250AMNIFC Fire Ops - Air to Air - NIFC Air 4
417.7875NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Logistics - NIFC Logs 3TA
167.1375NFMNIFC Fire Ops - Ground Ops - Tactical - NIFC IntraCrew 2
125.7250AM
The tac list on the database is obviously wrong as 170.0000 is now being used as the repeater output for a command portable repeater. It is the output of Command 4. NIFC does not mix the use of frequencies, you don't have anything duplicated among the tacs, commands and aviation functions. This frequency is not in the 2019 NTIA freq assignment for direct use, it is in the repeater assignment range, approximately 169.5000 - 173.9875 range setup for repeater output or remote base uses. 166.5000 to 169.5000 is for simplex use and 162.000 - 166.5000 is for repeater inputs.

Also, I've never seen a channel assignment for the 5 national air tactics frequencies. We are all sort of assuming it is done in frequency order from lowest to highest. Assumptions most often turn out to be errors. These 5 frequencies are available for air to air tactics or air to grounds.
 

Moosemedic

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 28, 2003
Messages
210
Location
Denver
Is anyone streaming any of these fires?

How about the various scanner Apps? Radio 5-0? Surely someone nearby has reprogrammed their stream for fires that will burn until it snows *Apparently it's going to snow Tuesday, so there's that ......
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Is anyone streaming any of these fires?

How about the various scanner Apps? Radio 5-0? Surely someone nearby has reprogrammed their stream for fires that will burn until it snows *Apparently it's going to snow Tuesday, so there's that ......
Hmm.. some of the feeds that previously might have had some of the channels are gone now. I believe there used to be some statewide mutual aid feeds.

MAC 7 (TGID 4006) is hopping today. It sounds like the fire is actually consuming the geographic area of crown point today, and they are rapidly working to protect the actual pingree park campus as it is closing in. Within 5 miles as of 630pm today. In addition to MAC 7 if you can get a good VHF signal you should tune 170.4125 for the primary Incident Command.
 

Moosemedic

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 28, 2003
Messages
210
Location
Denver
Hmm.. some of the feeds that previously might have had some of the channels are gone now. I believe there used to be some statewide mutual aid feeds.

MAC 7 (TGID 4006) is hopping today. It sounds like the fire is actually consuming the geographic area of crown point today, and they are rapidly working to protect the actual pingree park campus as it is closing in. Within 5 miles as of 630pm today. In addition to MAC 7 if you can get a good VHF signal you should tune 170.4125 for the primary Incident Command.


Shows a 10,000 acres growth since YESTERDAY
That's the kind of burn that Hayman and Bufflao Creek fires saw in one day
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO

Shows a 10,000 acres growth since YESTERDAY
That's the kind of burn that Hayman and Bufflao Creek fires saw in one day
Yeah not liking this one bit. Hot air gusting strongly down in Fort Collins, smoke as bad or worse than yesterday. I only just turned the scanners on, sounds like the evacuations are going broad now, they just called for more mandatory, and voluntary all the way in Crystal Lakes area and 14 possibly all the way to 287 now. I imagine this thing could just burn all the way up to the edge of where it's already burned from the High Park fire
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
My notes from today.

Fire is exploding, almost at 50,000 acres! Major evacuation efforts underway, many planned for tomorrow (Monday). Various agencies will be meeting at the stove prairie school in the morning prior to going door to door.

Heavy use of Rist Canyon Fire VHF Tac 1 Channel 156.2400 primarily for evacuation operations. They were also using Tac 2 on 156.0000 but I could not receive anything, and firefighters reported on Tac 1 they couldn't hear anyone on Tac 2 either.

The Communications Truck along with the whole Command post has been relocated to Livermore Fire Station #1 which is near u.s. 287 and 74e, 40.7935, -105.2198

I don't know if that communications truck is carrying any of the federal equipment like repeaters etc or if it is just state and/or county equipment, but I did notice much better reception on some of the federal VHF after the move was made. That could also just be due to the fire fighting efforts moving east and more into line of sight with Fort Collins.

Of the several air frequencies I heard, 168.4000 Air Tactics 05 was an absolute goldmine for information, with precise GPS coordinates, terrain descriptions, fire behavior being discussed in detail. They halted operations around 9PM and will be back at it in the morning.

Heard one person unknown agency report to IC and was told he will be on 169.7000mhz which I have no information on, so mystery for now

Another discussion heard where they discussed they were using a Swat Channel and a Surveillance channel in simplex. I am guessing this is county perhaps making use of old VHF channels still on the VHF radios they have but am unsure.
 

RMason

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Sep 18, 2003
Messages
25
It would be interesting if you could note what CTCSS tones you are hearing on 167.1375. Each hotshot crew has been given a channel and tone assignment. A list of these assignments is not to be found - YET. We will try to find it, but it is likely not available on the internet.
I saw C 254.1 on 167.1375
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Big worry about communications failures happening soon. Too many agencies coming to assist are dragging their home systems with them to the local sites instead of using travel channels or state mac. A primary site for DTRS and other is about to be impacted by the fire. They've put a wet ring around the radio tower but it might not be effective
 

Moosemedic

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 28, 2003
Messages
210
Location
Denver
Big worry about communications failures happening soon. Too many agencies coming to assist are dragging their home systems with them to the local sites instead of using travel channels or state mac. A primary site for DTRS and other is about to be impacted by the fire. They've put a wet ring around the radio tower but it might not be effective

Well, yeah ... that's because in EVERY tabletop exercise EVER the resources that are dragging their local systems into this incident ... They don't have any idea how to go to a direct + radio to radio talkgroup. They just seem to think ">This<" will never happen. So they leave their stations, with their batteries soon to die, and have barely the concept of a Tac channel, and then these comms failures will happen. In the debrief, they'll talk about how Comms was an issue, and not have learned a thing.
 

nicavery

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2013
Messages
21
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Well, yeah ... that's because in EVERY tabletop exercise EVER the resources that are dragging their local systems into this incident ... They don't have any idea how to go to a direct + radio to radio talkgroup. They just seem to think ">This<" will never happen. So they leave their stations, with their batteries soon to die, and have barely the concept of a Tac channel, and then these comms failures will happen. In the debrief, they'll talk about how Comms was an issue, and not have learned a thing.
It's interesting to see it all happen. You can tell when the radios roll into town, I typically only listen to DTRS on one site at any given time. There must be a Grand Junction fire rig or something parked here on the other side of the state, because all their Fire/EMS system has been on our sites over this side for a good week or more now. Do you know is there a way for the radio techs to see this happening and have a way to nerf those talkgroups off our sites? Horsetooth Mountain is perhaps the most important site to all of Northern Colorado and it only has 7 frequencies to dish out for everything from every bus service, school, public safety etc. I'm amazed it manages sometimes. Maybe Motorola and whatever 3rd party overseers of the system have a financial incentive to just let the systems get crashed so they can sell the state more sites and more *stuff*

The radio techs were here today they had to bring in generator equipment for the towers impacted by the fire as the utilities were all shut off (I think they have on site propane for backup generator but understandably propane and fire don't get along)
 
Last edited:

Moosemedic

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 28, 2003
Messages
210
Location
Denver
It's interesting to see it all happen. You can tell when the radios roll into town, I typically only listen to DTRS on one site at any given time. There must be a Grand Junction fire rig or something parked here on the other side of the state, because all their Fire/EMS system has been on our systems over this side for a good week or more now. Do you know is there a way for the radio techs to see this happening and have a way to nerf those talkgroups off our sites? Horsetooth Mountain is perhaps the most important site to all of Northern Colorado and it only has 7 frequencies to dish out for everything from every bus service, school, public safety etc. I'm amazed it manages sometimes. Maybe Motorola and whatever 3rd party overseers of the system have a financial incentive to just let the systems get crashed so they can sell the state more sites and more *stuff*

The radio techs were here today they had to bring in generator equipment for the towers impacted by the fire as the utilities were all shut off (I think they have on site propane for backup generator but understandably propane and fire don't get along)

Bingo!
See the biggerst challenge is to find someone from Grand Junction (I'm certain there is a heavy-hitter in this forum) and have him walk up to the Engine, look the Officer right in the eye and say "Hey KNUNKLEHEAD !, remeber the training about "Travel Channels?" Well how about you get off the GJC talkgroups, stop scanning home and focus on the deployment!!!"
 
Top