Emission Code question

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natedawg1604

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Hello folks

I recently came across emission codes "11KF3E" and "10KF1D" from a frequency associated with WQHL743 (Los Alamos County, NM Police). As I understand it Emission Designators are supposed to contain 7 characters, namely:

Characters 1-4: Necessary Bandwidth (three numerals and one letter)
Character 5: Types of Modulation of the Main Carrier
Character 6: Nature of Signal(s) Modulating the Main Carrier
Character 7: Type of Information to be Transmitted

Did the above-referenced emission codes omit a numeric digit from the bandwidth portion? Put another way, were these codes improperly constructed?
 

nd5y

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Yes. If the bandwidth was really supposed to be 11 and 10 kHz the emission designators should start with 11K0 and 10K0.
 

natedawg1604

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Thanks for the confirmation, good to know!

Who in the H*&L at FCC decided it would be a good idea to design/store emission codes by "merging" data that should be stored in FOUR (4) database fields, and combining it into ONE (1) damn field?? Not only that, the "bandwidth" portion basically uses one value to represent two other values with different data types. Was this format designed in the early 1980's when they didn't have a lot of memory on mainframes?
 

Comint

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. . Who in the H*&L at FCC decided it would be a good idea to design/store emission codes by "merging" data that should be stored in FOUR (4) database fields, and combining it into ONE (1) damn field??
The International Telecommunications Union (ITU), with the agreement of member countries, including the USA.

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Comint
 
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