• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

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    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

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Hytera files chapter 11 bankruptcy

AK9R

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bill4long

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Motorola is objecting to Hytera's plan to sell its U.S. assets:
Because some of those assets are Motorola's IP? I would expect as much. Not a big fan of Motorola, but we can't let Chinese companies rip off the IP of American companies. Go Motorola!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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About 2 , 3 years ago right before all this went down, I spoke with Hytera's rep, an American, who explained that the founder of HYT wanted to unseat Motorola as leader in two way radio. Hence the addition of ERA to HYT. The quality of the equipment and the breadth of product line is extremely impressive. However, I had just finished reading Motorola's IPSC planner and when I read Hytera's, it seemed word for word plagiarized. I dismissed it as having been pulled from ETSI standard, but maybe it was ripped from Motorola. It is really too bad because a strong DMR competitor is needed in the US. Did they hire the wrong engineers or was it planed? It was not well executed if it were intentional.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Boo hoo. Bye bye China. #DecoupleFromChina
I really don't see how we cannot admit to being complicit in this. And now suddenly, we have a problem that was not a problem for decades.

For decades, US manufacturers have willingly handed over their proprietary manufacturing to Chinese companies to boost their profit margin, have hired thousands of Chinese H1B engineers who have graduated from US universities who have profited from those student enrollments.
 

bill4long

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I really don't see how we cannot admit to being complicit in this. And now suddenly, we have a problem that was not a problem for decades.

For decades, US manufacturers have willingly handed over their proprietary manufacturing to Chinese companies to boost their profit margin, have hired thousands of Chinese H1B engineers who have graduated from US universities who have profited from those student enrollments.
When you say "we", it wasn't me. I have always been against coupling with the Chinese communists. The chickens are coming home to roost. And the "best" is yet to come. #DecoupleFromChina
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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When you say "we", it wasn't me. I have always been against coupling with the Chinese communists. The chickens are coming home to roost. And the "best" is yet to come. #DecoupleFromChina
The Chinese "commies" turned out to be formidable "capitalists". Fast learners. I applaud you bill4long for never buying any Chinese products. You are a better man than I.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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I didn't say that. That would be virtually impossible. But I'm definitely in favor of de-coupling.
That was my point about "We". I think we are going to be on the losing end in the short term. I don't see US manufacturers bringing production back to the US. They have some offshore options. But you can be sure, Malaysia, Phillipines, Thailand, etc are going to raise prices .
 

jhsands

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In North America, P25 is the chosen LE/FD/first responder digital mode. For the rest of the world, it’s Tetra. And Hytera is the largest Tetra radio mfr in the world. If you see photos of cops in far away countries, they carry Hytera radios. Moto is pi$$ed that Hytera took a slice of their pie, & ”in my opinion” this was payback.
Forced, not chosen. Thousands of public safety entities are running DMR/NXDN because of the P25 price fixing.
 
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Looks like Hytera is using a legal ploy similar to what Nextwave did to us taxpayers.
 

romanr

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I really don't see how we cannot admit to being complicit in this. And now suddenly, we have a problem that was not a problem for decades.

For decades, US manufacturers have willingly handed over their proprietary manufacturing to Chinese companies to boost their profit margin, have hired thousands of Chinese H1B engineers who have graduated from US universities who have profited from those student enrollments.
Remember that Chris Galvin was instrumental in helping China become the force that is today. Chris sent letters to Motorola's employees asking them to call their local politicians to support bringing China into the WTO. He built a semiconductor fab in Tianjin, China (MOS-17).

He didn't stay around to ride it to the bottom, but he can certainly be blamed for starting Motorola's infatuation with China.
 
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n1das

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Because some of those assets are Motorola's IP? I would expect as much. Not a big fan of Motorola, but we can't let Chinese companies rip off the IP of American companies. Go Motorola!
I am (expletived) enough at Hytera that I am done with Hytera. No more Hytera radios for me. I'm keeping what Hytera radios I own for now but I won't be getting any more Hytera radios in the future. If I need to replace a Hytera radio, it will get replaced with a Motorola radio. I'm going full Moto for all commercial radios in the future. Go Motorola!
 

PACNWDude

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+1 on the sentiment in this thread. I am retired military and have transitioned from Motorola to Harris Communications and Zetron dispatch equipment to keep my money in the United States. I know many that bought Hytera as a cheaper alternative to Motorola Trbo radios, and now regret their decision as the cheaper cost did come with some performance and quality control.
 

Ljay

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Hytera is one of the biggest liars, totally screwed all the dealers their reputations and there customers. Back in 2018 when this issue came up hytera told the dealers they had a solution. It was called an I series update. that only violated 3 item rights . By the way Hytera stopped shipping most of their line and and injunction has not even started. No system upgrades no expansion total screw job . We believe they stopped all shipments because they think they will need to pay additional royalty. Image having a customer based wide area trunking system and you can't add or service customers with additional radios or even expand your system

Would not be surprised if all US sales will be a discussion of recall
 

MTS2000des

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Hytera is just the tip of the turdberg. Chinese companies, who perpetuate intellectual property theft like a nasty, grease covered kitchen in a fly infested diner provide a safe haven for German roaches, the Chinese government foster and assist in stealing and copying the world's intellectual property for profit. Huawei makes Hytera look like child's play. All the US telecom cartels quickly jumped on the "cheap and good" bandwagon when snapping up Huawei LTE hardware, only to find out just like the scum that is Hytera, much of it compromised with a combo value meal of stolen IP, nuggets of spyware, topped off with a helpful fixing of crap that doesn't work.
 

K4RBT

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Nobody even thinks about Motorola sending engineers to Japan to dissemble a cell phone that was killing their sales because it WORKED. Motorola now either buys out competition, or takes them to court to destroy them. I. personally would not use someones elses code as you might carry a bug into your products. Having worked for them, I saw first hand their business plan.
When the last of the Galvin's left the board, it is now run by bean counters and lawyers. Hey, sounds like HCA!
They had some good products but sold them off when they could not compete, bye, bye microwave parducts, goodbye Canopy systems, good bye cell systems., goodbye semiconductor division, goodbye outside company sales force, goodbye COMSS. Two way radio is the only thing left. Maybe they are running scared because they do not have any more divisions to sell to keep the ship afloat.
 

MCWKen

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Allow me to interject some observations. The beginning of the end was in the 60''s. You all know about the Japanese transistor radio. Not only were they attractive to the consumer, but their technology and manufacturing processes were superior to portable radios made in the U.S.

U.S. companies like Phillips was offering products in the same era, with technology from the dark ages. It was the consumer that chose cheap.

Then there was a man from Sioux City who championed a new way of making things in factories. Instead of inspecting every product before it went out the door for defects. That man professed that we measure not the defects, but examine the processes that were used to make things and correct the process. But, major companies here in the U.S. ignored him. However, those in Japan embraced his ideas, and prospered.

In addition, companies here only looked as far as the next quarter. In Japan, they looked at the next quarter century.

As costs went up in the U.S., companies eyed labor and materials overseas. Those that did not, are no longer around.

(I would be remiss if I did not state that the Japanese government later on, subsidized targeted industries to gain a price edge on their products e.g. steel, copiers, consumer electronics)

But again, point the finger where it really belongs, at the U.S. consumer. They wanted cheap, and they got it.

\rant.
 
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romanr

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Philips is a Dutch company, founded in 1891.

Capitalism thrives by profitably offering better value to your customers. The consumer should be expected to choose the better value.

You are correct to critique American businesses for not figuring out how to offer the better value, but why condemn the consumer for choosing the lower cost?

The "geniuses" of American businesses didn't look far enough into the future to see the ultimate cost of ignoring their market. Why blame the average consumer for making the same mistake?
 
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