SDS100/SDS200: In case you didn't know, protect your LAN port

KV4PM

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Joined
Apr 16, 2022
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94
Location
Fairhope, AL USA & Nambour, Queensland Australia
As an electrical engineer who has worked more years than I care to admit for an electric utility in a lightning-prone area, I've seen it do strange things. At my own home years ago, lightning struck a nail on an outer wall, went inside, blew the soles out of a pair of shoes, throwing them across the room. My insurance agent was amused when I took the shoes by his office when I submitted my claim for all the damaged electronics I had to replace.
 

KB4MSZ

Billy
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Mar 12, 2018
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943
Location
Tampa, Florida
At my own home years ago, lightning struck a nail on an outer wall, went inside, blew the soles out of a pair of shoes, throwing them across the room.
The same thing happened to me back in the late 60's, can't even get a dial tone now.
 

W0BTU

Ham since 1976
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Joined
Jan 16, 2016
Messages
6
Location
S. Greenfield, MO
Never heard of lightning traveling over glass! Glass is an insulator.

True. But the fiber optic cable in this area has a corrugated metal sheath just under the plastic jacket (like the shield in Heliax coax). All the way from the road to the box on the back of my house.

That sheath is supposed to be properly grounded at that point.
 

HiddenLefty

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Joined
Jun 29, 2021
Messages
70
Location
Brownwood, Texas
Found a pole across the road directly from the one my line is on. Old pole nothing is on or connected to anymore but it blew the top to pieces, burnt it pretty good, and no doubt arced over from that. Very surprising there was no fire except that it was wet and rainy when that would have happened. The port it was connected to on the router is also dead now and no longer works I have discovered.

Pole
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
24,264
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I am a lineman for the county.
Found a pole across the road directly from the one my line is on. Old pole nothing is on or connected to anymore but it blew the top to pieces, burnt it pretty good, and no doubt arced over from that.

Often the poles will have a copper grounding plate on the butt end (bottom of the pole that is in the ground) and a copper ground wire running to the top where it would attach to messenger wires or other hardware. Likely the lightning found that. No doubt put a lot of energy into the ground around the base of that pole.
 
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