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coolrich55

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Will be visiting LA and was wondering if there is a list of LAFD radio codes anywhere. Also does the hotshot channel still rebroadcast on and analog frequency? Thanks
 

ko6jw_2

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I have always found LAFD to be mostly plain language with no unusual codes. I don't know what you are referring to as a "hotshot channel." LAFD in a rarity in that it is 800Mhz, but not trunked and still uses analog. The RR database is accurate as far as I know. Google LAFD or Los Angeles Fire Department and you will find lots of info, station locations and history. I remember when they dispatched of 33.70Mhz. Seattle FD was on the same frequency and they could talk to each other when conditions were right.

LAFD does computer dispatching and uses on the air dispatching for units not in quarters. They have MDT's as well. It's a very high volume system with 1200-1500+ calls a day.
 

coolrich55

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Sorry, I meant lapd k9 air hotshot channel. I read an old document that said 154.830 is a simulcast of the digital frequency." LAPD Access 22 on 484.4375 MHz and LAPD Tac 1 "Hot shot" on 154.83 MHz is still analog and can be monitored by current radio scanners. LAPD Tac 1 is actually an analog simulcast of the Air/K9 Unit calling channel on frequency 484.7125 which is digital. Contrary to many misconceptions there are no plans to discontinue the use of 154.83 MHz (The old Tac 1 channel) to simulcast Air/K9."
 

coolrich55

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Nevermind. I found an old thread on here about 154.830 and it went down in 2007 and never was fixed.It was a very interesting read about the history of lapd and fd radio systems.
 

bryan_herbert

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LAPD was originally on medium wave just above the AM broadcast band and moved to VHF (I believe) in the 40s, then around 81-82 started moving to UHF. Only uniformed divisions and patrol officers were on UHF at first, detectives were still on VHF so the decision was made to simulcast Air/K9 on VHF to keep them in the loop. It is my understanding once the move to UHF was complete, the VHF side of Air/K9 was allowed to stay on-air for nostalgic purposes until the transmitter failed and was too expensive to repair.
 
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KMA367

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LAPD "Air / K9 / Hotshot" frequency

LAPD was originally on medium wave just above the AM broadcast band and moved to VHF (I believe) in the 40s, then around 81-82 started moving to UHF. Only uniformed divisions and patrol officers were on UHF at first, detectives were still on VHF so the decision was made to simulcast Air/K9 on VHF to keep them in the loop. It is my understanding once the move to UHF was complete, the VHF side of Air/K9 was allowed to stay on-air for nostalgic purposes until the transmitter failed and was too expensive to repair.
Good information as always, Bryan. Just a little fine-tuning on the dates.

When LAPD went to UHF in the early 80s with their 8-channel MX-350s, they only had 18 frequency pairs to work with: 12 dispatch pairs (3 per bureau); 4 tac frequencies (1 per bureau), and the emergency "trigger" frequency 507.2625. Metro Div had 506.8375 to itself. So the Air, K9, and many other citywide units continued to keep a watch on "hot-shot" Tac 1, 154.83. Reason behind that, which went back to about 1974, was so those guys could keep one of their radios parked on that frequency no matter where they were and hear hot calls, or requests for their services, from anywhere in the city.

When the 256-channel Astro Saber IIIs showed up about 1995, along with a bunch of UHF-T Channel 16 frequencies, they finally had enough capacity to give them a dedicated UHF channel, 484.7125 (plus 484.35 later). At first it was in Ch 21, but in 2004 they moved it to its current Ch 26 to make room for the planned Mission (#19), Olympic (#20) & Topanga (#21) Divisions. Channels 22, 23, 24 and 25 went to the four traffic divisions. As you said, when the Tac 1 transmitter apparently went belly-up in 2007 they never brought it back, and nobody seems to have missed it... other than people who only have analog scanners!
 
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RetInspector

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I agree with scottyhetzel, thank you for the interesting answers. Another question for one of you, though.

When LAPD went to UHF in the early 80s with their 8-channel MX-350s, they only had 18 frequency pairs to work with: 12 dispatch pairs (3 per bureau); 4 tac frequencies (1 per bureau), and the emergency "trigger" frequency 507.2625. Metro Div had 506.8375 to itself
.
If I remember right, during that time from 1980 to 1995 LAPD had 18 patrol divisions, from Central #1 to Southeast #18, and four traffic divisions, or bureaus. I don't remember, how did they fit 22 divisions on only 12 dispatch frequencies? There were a lot of voices on the radio, I do remember that. Did they rotate the divisions among the dispatchers the way LASO does it, or have two or three divisions on each frequency? That would seem to be awfully hard to handle.

So the Air, K9, and many other citywide units continued to keep a watch on "hot-shot" Tac 1, 154.83. Reason behind that, which went back to about 1974, was so those guys could keep one of their radios parked on that frequency no matter where they were and hear hot calls, or requests for their services, from anywhere in the city.
That makes sense, and I used to sometimes just listen to Tact 1 for the hot-shots and avoid all the routine calls on the regular frequencies.
 

KMA367

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During that time all but two divisions had to share their dispatch frequencies. Only Hollywood and 77th had frequencies to themselves. For example, Rampart & Northeast were paired, as were Wilshire & Pacific; Valley Traffic & Devonshire, etc.
 
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