• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

LTE 2 way radios will make commercial LMR systems a thing of the past

milf

Careful, I CAN hear you!
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Dec 18, 2002
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13,550
I thought Nextel was dead and buried. Shows ya what I know.
We still have an ancient Nextel Motorola analog TRS here, and one down in MS, that still has a couple of users. The only iDEN systems still in use that I know of though are SoLinc, and AirINC. Not to mention Nextel is still the big license holders for all that old PS bandwidth that is still being renewed every few years. Not being put to use as far as I can tell, just held onto.
 

emcom

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2002
Messages
209
Location
Huntsville, Alabama
As stated, cell radios are not intended for primary public safety communications. What happens if the system goes down for whatever reason? Then what? There is no direct mode so you'd be SOL, and here they are trying to save lives. These radios we are discussing here on this thread are business oriented LTE radios.

For the money everyone is spending on expensive 700Mhz equipment that doesn't work well anyway, you should look into a location to set up your own VHF or UHF analog public safety grade repeater. That way YOU have control of it. Subscriber radios can then be had for cheap(er). Not every dept especially rural needs a fancy whiz bang P25 trunked radio system. Analog conventional still works just fine, and is very economical. Good luck!
PTT over LTE has been issued out. We still will have the old P25 radios in the car (maybe the handhelds too). We have been testing them out and the voice is much clearer than P25. We will see if it holds up. Let me be clear, this is for a couple of small departments, so less than 20 officers. Not countywide.
 
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Jun 16, 2013
Messages
3,530
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Texas
PTT over LTE has been issued out. We still will have the old P25 radios in the car (maybe the handhelds too). We have been testing them out and the voice is much clearer than P25. We will see if it holds up. Let me be clear, this is for a couple of small departments, so less than 20 officers. Not countywide.
Curious to see if you find 2100 ms of latency acceptable. Bear min mind, P25 spec calls for a maximum latency of 500 ms encode to decode when transitioning an RFSS.
 

jim202

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2002
Messages
2,636
Location
New Orleans region
12dbsinad said:
As stated, cell radios are not intended for primary public safety communications. What happens if the system goes down for whatever reason? Then what? There is no direct mode so you'd be SOL, and here they are trying to save lives. These radios we are discussing here on this thread are business oriented LTE radios.

For the money everyone is spending on expensive 700 MHz equipment that doesn't work well anyway, you should look into a location to set up your own VHF or UHF analog public safety grade repeater. That way YOU have control of it. Subscriber radios can then be had for cheap(er). Not every dept especially rural needs a fancy whiz bang P25 trunked radio system. Analog conventional still works just fine, and is very economical. Good luck!


I have a hard time understanding your comment that "700 equipment doesn't work". If that was the case, we would not see the mass migration to it around the country. However, I will say that it works only as good as the system was designed and installed.

Here in Louisiana, if you have a radio on the LWIN 700 MHz. system installed by the state, you can actually go just about any place in the state and stay on your normal dispatch talk group and still talk to your Dispatcher.

In our Parish (County to most other people), you can even use a portable radio in most buildings here in St. Tammany Parish and still get into the trunking system. Can't be using stubby antennas on the portable, but the system works. All the towers are linked by microwave and not telco supplied lines. Each tower has a back up generator to keep the site operational if the local electrical power goes out. Some sites are raised above the ground due to flooding and others are on the ground.

Bottom line, any radio system is only as good as the design and installation.
 

12dbsinad

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
1,189
12dbsinad said:
As stated, cell radios are not intended for primary public safety communications. What happens if the system goes down for whatever reason? Then what? There is no direct mode so you'd be SOL, and here they are trying to save lives. These radios we are discussing here on this thread are business oriented LTE radios.

For the money everyone is spending on expensive 700 MHz equipment that doesn't work well anyway, you should look into a location to set up your own VHF or UHF analog public safety grade repeater. That way YOU have control of it. Subscriber radios can then be had for cheap(er). Not every dept especially rural needs a fancy whiz bang P25 trunked radio system. Analog conventional still works just fine, and is very economical. Good luck!


I have a hard time understanding your comment that "700 equipment doesn't work". If that was the case, we would not see the mass migration to it around the country. However, I will say that it works only as good as the system was designed and installed.

Here in Louisiana, if you have a radio on the LWIN 700 MHz. system installed by the state, you can actually go just about any place in the state and stay on your normal dispatch talk group and still talk to your Dispatcher.

In our Parish (County to most other people), you can even use a portable radio in most buildings here in St. Tammany Parish and still get into the trunking system. Can't be using stubby antennas on the portable, but the system works. All the towers are linked by microwave and not telco supplied lines. Each tower has a back up generator to keep the site operational if the local electrical power goes out. Some sites are raised above the ground due to flooding and others are on the ground.

Bottom line, any radio system is only as good as the design and installation.
I was responding to the post I quoted. He said the 700 system doesn't cover their area well (I would assume lack of sites in the area), that's what I was referring too.
 
Last edited:

emcom

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2002
Messages
209
Location
Huntsville, Alabama
12dbsinad said:
As stated, cell radios are not intended for primary public safety communications. What happens if the system goes down for whatever reason? Then what? There is no direct mode so you'd be SOL, and here they are trying to save lives. These radios we are discussing here on this thread are business oriented LTE radios.

For the money everyone is spending on expensive 700 MHz equipment that doesn't work well anyway, you should look into a location to set up your own VHF or UHF analog public safety grade repeater. That way YOU have control of it. Subscriber radios can then be had for cheap(er). Not every dept especially rural needs a fancy whiz bang P25 trunked radio system. Analog conventional still works just fine, and is very economical. Good luck!


I have a hard time understanding your comment that "700 equipment doesn't work". If that was the case, we would not see the mass migration to it around the country. However, I will say that it works only as good as the system was designed and installed.

Here in Louisiana, if you have a radio on the LWIN 700 MHz. system installed by the state, you can actually go just about any place in the state and stay on your normal dispatch talk group and still talk to your Dispatcher.

In our Parish (County to most other people), you can even use a portable radio in most buildings here in St. Tammany Parish and still get into the trunking system. Can't be using stubby antennas on the portable, but the system works. All the towers are linked by microwave and not telco supplied lines. Each tower has a back up generator to keep the site operational if the local electrical power goes out. Some sites are raised above the ground due to flooding and others are on the ground.

Bottom line, any radio system is only as good as the design and installation.
Considering LA's highest elevation in the whole state is 535 feet, the signal has very little to block it. In our town, we are 581' between 2 - 1500'+ mountains (hills to those in the west) and several smaller (1,000 - 1,200') hills. We have lots of shadows. Plus, to outfit a car with a radio and a man with a radio is $7,000 for P25. Our radio system has 95-96% coverage, but when you regularly work in that 4% and it is rural versus urban, no one wants to pay a Million bucks for tower and trunk radios/site equipment.
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2013
Messages
3,530
Location
Texas
Considering LA's highest elevation in the whole state is 535 feet, the signal has very little to block it. In our town, we are 581' between 2 - 1500'+ mountains (hills to those in the west) and several smaller (1,000 - 1,200') hills. We have lots of shadows. Plus, to outfit a car with a radio and a man with a radio is $7,000 for P25. Our radio system has 95-96% coverage, but when you regularly work in that 4% and it is rural versus urban, no one wants to pay a Million bucks for tower and trunk radios/site equipment.
I mean...you'd be surprised what trees can attenuate. Bastrop County, TX supposedly left the LCRA 900 MHz system they were on for a 700 MHz simulcast system tied into the City of Austin's GATRRS core due to the pine needles causing 20+ dB more attenuation at 900 MHz compared to 700 MHz.

That being said, don't forget about Colorado's DTRS system. It's a very effective system, in fact it's effective enough that the local SO of a county I have property in has migrated their dispatch operations to DTRS (though all of the cruisers keep VHF as a secondary). That's impressive considering their VHF site was one awesome site (10,000' ASL with direct LOS to Colorado Springs 80 miles away). The VFD still operates on VHF though to keep the equipment costs down.
 
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