Replacing SD card in 536

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ve1sef

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This morning my 536 displayed "SD card read error". Run up-dates, worked about 30 minutes then message reappeared.
Suspecting the card is corrupted. Went looking couldn't find any 4gb cards. What size could I safely use as a replacement?
 

ofd8001

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The High Endurance variety of cards is recommended. The scanner does a lot of behind the scenes reading and writing that you may not even notice.

The High Endurance cards tolerate more of these cycles and thus last longer. They all will wear out eventually.
 

rvacs

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I have always had luck with SanDisk Extreme 32gb - $11 on Amazon. Used them in the past on my 536hp and now in my SDS100/200.

On your existing one - make sure you format Fat32 - or use SD Card Formatter.
Once your done with that in Sentinel do Tools -> Clear User Data on the new card that preps it and then see if you can write to it.
 

ofd8001

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And if you are going to get one card, may as well get a second to have as a spare. Those things go bad at the worst times and a spare is a good thing.
 

N9JIG

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If you do not need the Replay option turn it off in the menu, this will dramatically reduce the read-writes to the card and reduce the possibility of card corruption by a huge factor.
 

Ubbe

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Read cycles are almost unlimited in a SD card. It's the write cycles that count. A Uniden scanner only writes if you have the record function on and when you change any programming and when you turn off the scanner. Any other changes are only stored in RAM to save on the number of write cycles to the SD card. That's why you loose some new settings you have done if you cut the power to the scanner and it hasn't got the time to save the new data to the card.

Modern SD cards have a life span of millions of writes and should never wear out during a scanners life time. It's normal electronic failures that makes a SD card stop working and that's mostly depending of luck. Even the most expensive endurance cards could fail and have nothing to do with that the number of write cycles have been exceeded.

Take out the SD card from the scanner and rub the contacts with you thumb and insert again. It could be oxidation (Uniden uses extremly cheap material in their contacts in their modern scanners) or dust that are the problem. But take the advice to always have a spare programmed SD card taped to the scanner to switch to if problems occure.

/Ubbe
 

ofd8001

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Read cycles are almost unlimited in a SD card. It's the write cycles that count. A Uniden scanner only writes if you have the record function on and when you change any programming and when you turn off the scanner.

Modern SD cards have a life span of millions of writes and should never wear out during a scanners life time. It's normal electronic failures that makes a SD card stop working and that's mostly depending of luck. Even the most expensive endurance cards could fail and have nothing to do with that the number of write cycles have been exceeded.

Take out the SD card from the scanner and rub the contacts with you thumb and insert again. It could be oxidation (Uniden uses extremly cheap material in their contacts in their modern scanners) or dust that are the problem. But take the advice to always have a spare programmed SD card taped to the scanner to switch to if problems occure.

/Ubbe
Ain't what Upman said: Replacement SD Cards

Getting skin oils on electrical contacts is a sure way of oxidation - pencil erasers are "more better".
 

Ubbe

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Getting skin oils on electrical contacts is a sure way of oxidation - pencil erasers are "more better".
You lubricate contacts with oil to keep them from oxidating. It's the exposure to air that makes them oxidate. Rubbing them clean with you fingers are an excellent way to do it.

/Ubbe
 
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