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bharvey2

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Okay. Give the listening experiment a try and see what happens. That might solve half of your problem. What complaints are you getting from others: that they can't hear you at all or that you are distorted, sound strange, etc.? If everyone says your transmit audio is poor, you could just have a bad radio.
 

azduststorm

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Okay. Give the listening experiment a try and see what happens. That might solve half of your problem. What complaints are you getting from others: that they can't hear you at all or that you are distorted, sound strange, etc.? If everyone says your transmit audio is poor, you could just have a bad radio.
all the above issues lol. speaking of having a bad radio, I have white crap that is getting worce on the silver speaker, it started out small now its getting worse I have no idea what it is. hey thanks for all your help!
 

wtp

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the only winning move is

not to play.
if they did not give you a radio. then that is it.
or ONLY listen and never talk.
 

wirr

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No FCC license is required to transmit on a MURS frequency like 154.600. What is needed is a radio that conforms to MURS regulations and limitations.
 

azduststorm

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No FCC license is required to transmit on a MURS frequency like 154.600. What is needed is a radio that conforms to MURS regulations and limitations.
so which radio would let me do this? Without getting into trouble. I still want my fcc licensed I've always wanted to be a ham operator
 
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Note that the first three are narrow band and the last two are wide band. They are a bit off from most LMR radios which are 12.5khz narrow band and 25khz wide band.
It's not off at all.

What the FCC has done (likely to incite more confusion and get people to follow the rules) is given the maximum allowed bandwidth, not the actual channel bandwidth.

LMR radios are designated as narrowband being 12.5 kHz and wideband as 25 kHz. However, if you actually look into the emissions designators which make those up you'll find that the real numbers are 11.25 kHz (often a designator of 11K2 or 11K3) and 20 kHz (20K0). The details of technical calculations behind those terms can be found in Part 2.
 

azduststorm

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It's not off at all.

What the FCC has done (likely to incite more confusion and get people to follow the rules) is given the maximum allowed bandwidth, not the actual channel bandwidth.

LMR radios are designated as narrowband being 12.5 kHz and wideband as 25 kHz. However, if you actually look into the emissions designators which make those up you'll find that the real numbers are 11.25 kHz (often a designator of 11K2 or 11K3) and 20 kHz (20K0). The details of technical calculations behind those terms can be found in Part 2.
nice so someone is moderating me? ill be sure to stay off the radio then. I don't think its fair that I can get into trouble for using a radio just because I want to do a better job at my work! btw I know that's a texas call sing. thank you for the heads up. I don't understand why ppl take this so seriously
 
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nice so someone is moderating me? ill be sure to stay off the radio then. I don't think its fair that I can get into trouble for using a radio just because I want to do a better job at my work! btw I know that's a texas call sing. thank you for the heads up. I don't understand why ppl take this so seriously
FCC generally doesn't act until they receive a complaint.

On the fairness of being able to get into trouble for using a radio and be a better employee. Much the same could be said about truck drivers driving under the influence of certain stimulants in order to ignore the body's requirement for sleep and deliver loads in a more efficient/profitable manner.

Not necessarily a Texas call. When the call was initially issued W calls were reserved for stations east of the Mississippi and K calls for stations west. Louisiana is also in region and the call was originally issued to an operator living in Baton Rouge, LA (who later moved to Texas).
 

azduststorm

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FCC generally doesn't act until they receive a complaint.

On the fairness of being able to get into trouble for using a radio and be a better employee. Much the same could be said about truck drivers driving under the influence of certain stimulants in order to ignore the body's requirement for sleep and deliver loads in a more efficient/profitable manner.

Not necessarily a Texas call. When the call was initially issued W calls were reserved for stations east of the Mississippi and K calls for stations west. Louisiana is also in region and the call was originally issued to an operator living in Baton Rouge, LA (who later moved to Texas).
sorry about last post I was slightly buzzed drinking. I shouldn't be on forms when I'm buzzed I run my mouth to much
 

bharvey2

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It's not off at all.

What the FCC has done (likely to incite more confusion and get people to follow the rules) is given the maximum allowed bandwidth, not the actual channel bandwidth.

LMR radios are designated as narrowband being 12.5 kHz and wideband as 25 kHz. However, if you actually look into the emissions designators which make those up you'll find that the real numbers are 11.25 kHz (often a designator of 11K2 or 11K3) and 20 kHz (20K0). The details of technical calculations behind those terms can be found in Part 2.
Your correct. I didn't think about the emission designators. Glad you pointed that out.
 
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