Thoughts on this hardline

mmckenna

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A photo of with the jacket stripped back would help.

It's been 2 decades since I did anything with cable TV systems. Back then I do not recall any 1/4 hardline. Usually it was .500 or.750 inches. 1/4 inch stuff was all RG-6 or RG-11.

There's a couple of things you are going to run in to:
1. There's some members on this site that will positively freak out if you mention using 75Ω cable with 50Ω antennas/radios. Yes it'll work. No, your radio will not explode into a mushroom cloud. No, it's not ideal, but people do it all the time.
2. Finding suitable connectors to match your radio/antenna can be a bit of a challenge. The cost of installation tools to properly install a connector on that cable may be expensive, and more than just buying the right cable.

Without knowing exactly what kind of cable it is, finding the right connectors may be a challenge. You'll see a bit of additional loss compared to using similar size 50Ω coax.

Usually for transmitting type stuff, you're better off getting some good 50Ω cable.
At least it prevents the arguments that will spring up over the 50Ω vs 75Ω stuff, and you know how much hams like to argue….
 

iMONITOR

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This looks to be 1/4 inch hardline with hanging wire for support was used for cable tv service any ideas on loss? wanting to use it for my dual band radio..
That's exactly what Xfinity/COMCAST Cable TV/Internet service installed outside my home. It's quite rugged.
 

N4GIX

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That's called a "messenger wire". The cable is tensioned only by using the "messenger wire" at both ends so that the cable itself has minimal strain on it.
 
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