Why no Pink!!

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Tryton

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OK, First off I cannot believe I'm going to ask this in an open forum.. but I promised my 7 year old daughter I'd ask and find out. I have 2 996XT's side by side, When fire groups come on, the display turns red. When PD comes on, Blue is the color.. So, My daughter comes up to me and asks "Daddy, how come they don't put pink in radios?" I sat for a moment, trying to find an answer for her.. Then she said "is it because it's for boys?" I immediately told her no, This is a hobby for everyone! I did try to explain that Firetrucks are usually red, and police are usually represented by the color blue. What would you have said? :lol:
 
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N0WEF

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I saw the thread title and was tempted to haze you a bit, but was left saying, "Awww, How cute!"

My best answer would be... The alpha/beta test groups choose the colors they liked best, and Uniden implemented the highest scoring colors.

Though, I do think your daughters answer is quite close to right considering the percentages of men vs. women in this hobby.
 

K9DAK

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You should consider getting her a PRO-106 when she's old enough . . . pink is a color choice! Well, it's probably considered magenta, but you could play with the RGB mix enough to make pink.

I have that color set for my county sheriff's EDACS system, for no other reason than my wife said "ooh, that's a pretty color!" She's the one who allowed my to buy it after all. :)
 

N0WEF

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I just checked, the PSR800 gives you pink as a choice for the LED. (Actually, 3 different pinks)

I was happy not to haze you, it was the cutest thing I've ever read on RR.... (Crap, now I'm going to get hazed. LOL)
 
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Confuzzled

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The display color comes from LEDs, right?

Not that a 7 year old would understand it, but the answer is in the chemistry of the LED. I've seen blue, green, yellow, orange and red, but not much in between. Of course, a few variations of white. Aside from the plastic used for the case, the color comes from the elements used in the semiconductor construction.

Development of Multiple LED Colors

The first commercial light emitting diode, developed in the 1960s, utilized the primary constituents gallium, arsenic, and phosphorus to produce red light (655-nanometer wavelength). An additional red light-emitting material, gallium phosphide, was later used to produce diodes emitting 700-nanometer light. The latter version has seen limited application, in spite of high efficiency, due to the low apparent brightness resulting from relative insensitivity of the human eye in that spectral region. Throughout the 1970s, technological developments enabled additional diode colors to be introduced, and production improvements increased the quality control and reliability of the devices.

Changes in the elemental proportions, doping, and substrate materials resulted in development of gallium-arsenide-phosphorus (GaAsP) diodes producing orange and yellow emission, as well as a higher-efficiency red emitter. Green diodes based on GaP chips were also developed. The introduction and refinement of the use of gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs), during the 1980s, resulted in a rapid growth in the number of applications for light emitting diodes, largely due to an order-of-magnitude improvement in brightness compared to previous devices. This gain in performance was achieved by the use of multilayer heterojunction structures in the chip fabrication, and although these GaAlAs diodes are limited to emission in the red (660 nanometers), they began to be used in outdoor signs, bar code scanners, medical equipment, and fiber optic data transmission.
A major development occurred in the late 1980s, when LED designers borrowed techniques from the rapidly progressing laser diode industry, leading to the production of high-brightness visible light diodes based on the indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide (AlGaInP) system. This material allows changes in the emission color by adjustment of the band gap. Therefore, the same production techniques can be employed to produce red, orange, yellow, and green LEDs. Table 1 lists many of the common LED chip materials (epitaxial layers and, in some cases, the substrate) and their emission wavelengths (or corresponding color temperature for white light LEDS).

More recently, blue LEDs have been developed based on gallium nitride and silicon carbide materials. Production of light in this shorter-wavelength, more energetic region of the visible spectrum, has long been elusive to designers of LEDs. High photon energies typically increase the failure rate of semiconductor devices, and the low sensitivity of the human eye to blue light adds to the brightness requirement for a useful blue diode. One of the most important aspects of a blue light emitting diode is that it completes the red, green, and blue (RGB) primary color family to provide an additional mechanism of producing solid-state white light, through the mixing of these component colors.
Molecular Expressions Microscopy Primer: Physics of Light and Color - Introduction to Light Emitting Diodes


Understand all of that?
 

gewecke

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Someone's got issues brother! I LOVE it! My daughters laughed then asked if a radio like that really exists and how much it costs! :confused: Thanks for posting it buddy!

Manny
I think it would be a total blast to slip that in the fire chief's charger when he's not looking and hide around the corner with a camera!! :lol::lol:

73,
n9zas
 
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