Yaesu: Yaesu VX-5 Programming Issue

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Smash05

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Can't upload using Chirp. Errors off during upload. I'm using most up to date build with confirmed cable and download works fine. I'm running Chirp on a MAC. Any thoughts?


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W2PDX

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I've had various levels of success using CHIRP with various radio models. Sometimes it works flawlessly and sometimes it's not worth the headache. Can you post what type of error you're receiving during the upload? That might be able to narrow down what's going on.

As a general rule of thumb, it's best to read the radio first and use that code plug as your baseline. When I've used CHIRP to do a few CCRs (Baofeng UV-5Rs to be specific), it's not uncommon to receive a firmware mismatch error during the upload when you try to use an existing code plug instead of reading the radio first and using the original code plug as the base for your new code plug.

On the flip side from CHIRP is RT Systems, which I've also used with various Yaesu radios over the years. The RTS software only runs in a Windows environment though so not sure if that will work with your Mac situation. RTS is also not free like CHIRP but I doubt you'd have any problems with it.
 

KK4JUG

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I have to agree with W2PDX. Usually Chirp works. Sometimes it doesn't. The upside of that is that it didn't cost you anything. Between my personal radios and the ones I use with the regional SAR task force, I've used 8 different software versions from RT systems on mostly Kenwood and Yaesu radios. The software always performs flawlessly, it's intuitive and it does exactly what it's supposed to. The downside? It costs money. It comes down to "You get what you pay for."
 

Smash05

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I have to agree with W2PDX. Usually Chirp works. Sometimes it doesn't. The upside of that is that it didn't cost you anything. Between my personal radios and the ones I use with the regional SAR task force, I've used 8 different software versions from RT systems on mostly Kenwood and Yaesu radios. The software always performs flawlessly, it's intuitive and it does exactly what it's supposed to. The downside? It costs money. It comes down to "You get what you pay for."


I'll need to find PC then.


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KK4JUG

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You can program the radio without a computer. Or you could get an older laptop. It doesn't have to be powerful or fancy.

I program all my radios from a little Acer netbook that's probably 6-8 years old. It runs on Windows 7. The battery last more than 7 hours and works great. If you could find something like that, it shouldn't cost more than $60.

It doesn't have an internal CD drive. To install the programming software, I copy the CD to an SD card.

Just so you know, I also have Chirp on that computer.
 

kayn1n32008

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Can't upload using Chirp... I'm running Chirp on a MAC. Any thoughts
Try using a PC. I used CHiRP once for a CCR. While it did work, I did not care for the software that much.

... On the flip side from CHIRP is RT System... RTS is also not free like CHIRP but I doubt you'd have any problems with it.
RT Systems software is the cats meow. Not only that, it is pretty cheap for the quality of software you get. People complain that you have to buy their cable, but their cables paired with their software are a solid product. Just their after sale support is with the price of admission I have had issues with lost disks, and a bad cable out of the box. They went out of their way to make sure I was happy.

...I've used 8 different software versions from RT systems on mostly Kenwood and Yaesu radios. The software always performs flawlessly, it's intuitive and it does exactly what it's supposed to. The downside? It costs money. It comes down to "You get what you pay for."
I agree 150%. You get what you pay for. I have used RT Systems since I got my VX-170.

I own and have cables for the following radios:

VX-170, FT-277, FT-8800, TM-V71a and IC-92ad.

I can drag and drop between different models and different brands. It imports directly from Repeater Book, ARRL Travel Plus.

Considering what some LMR software sells for, RT Systems is a cheap investment, that will save you time and headaches.
 

wrath

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I run all my programming on win 7 , it's an antique compared to some of the machines now but its cheap and simple as well as stable , my main computers are Mac, but I keep this windows machine around just for my radios and wheelchairs, you can pick up a good new or used win 7 machine for sub $200 .

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Smash05

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I found my old Windows Laptop and completed programming


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k6cpo

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You can program the radio without a computer. Or you could get an older laptop. It doesn't have to be powerful or fancy.

I program all my radios from a little Acer netbook that's probably 6-8 years old. It runs on Windows 7. The battery last more than 7 hours and works great. If you could find something like that, it shouldn't cost more than $60.

It doesn't have an internal CD drive. To install the programming software, I copy the CD to an SD card.

Just so you know, I also have Chirp on that computer.
For the most part I program my radios with RT Systems software on a Windows 10 laptop, but I also have all the software loaded in a Toshiba netbook running Windows XP that's a lot more portable than the big laptop. Works like a champ.

The trend I like is that Yaesu—and maybe others, I'm not sure—are now equipping their radios with MicroSD card slots and enabling the radio to be programmed using a card. Makes it much easier changing the programming on the mobile.
 

KK4JUG

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The trend I like is that Yaesu—and maybe others, I'm not sure—are now equipping their radios with MicroSD card slots and enabling the radio to be programmed using a card. Makes it much easier changing the programming on the mobile.
I just bought a Yaesu FT-8900D and, unfortunately, it doesn't have it.
 

wrath

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The 8900 as a model is at least 10 years old , it used to be the flagship of Yaesu mobiles, the 1900 , 2900, 7800, 7900, 8800 and the 8900 being top dog .each one basicsly added a little something that the next rig down did not do .

I could be wrong but I belive Icom started the micro sd cards in radio's , I use the card in my 74 A to record my QSO'S for quick review if I miss something , but I know newer hams who record all QSO'S and store them on CD for permanent later review . The trend has caught on and even scanners have sd's these days, the problem I have with Yaesus implementation of the SD is how proprietary and restricted use they have , the FT 1 cards can not be dropped into the FT 2 , hopefully they will change this in future models, it would be real nice to get a new radio and just pop a card in and have all your settings files done and transferred so your new rig fits just like the old one did.

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k6cpo

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I just bought a Yaesu FT-8900D and, unfortunately, it doesn't have it.
To the best of my knowledge, the only Yaesus that have the cards are the System Fusion radios.
The 8900 as a model is at least 10 years old , it used to be the flagship of Yaesu mobiles, the 1900 , 2900, 7800, 7900, 8800 and the 8900 being top dog .each one basicsly added a little something that the next rig down did not do .

I could be wrong but I belive Icom started the micro sd cards in radio's , I use the card in my 74 A to record my QSO'S for quick review if I miss something , but I know newer hams who record all QSO'S and store them on CD for permanent later review . The trend has caught on and even scanners have sd's these days, the problem I have with Yaesus implementation of the SD is how proprietary and restricted use they have , the FT 1 cards can not be dropped into the FT 2 , hopefully they will change this in future models, it would be real nice to get a new radio and just pop a card in and have all your settings files done and transferred so your new rig fits just like the old one did.

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One of my peeves too... It's possible to copy and paste from one radio programmer to another though. It takes a little more time but means you don't have to recreate the file for each radio.
 
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