AIRINC

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BMT

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AERONAUTICAL RADIO, INC (ARINC)
(Services available for aircraft engaged in international flight)
ARINC using Pacific common air/ground ATC frequency networks shared with other ground stations are listed below. The
frequencies in use will depend on the time and conditions which affect radio propagation. International flights on the
ground at ANC or within VHF range of the SEA–ANC network that are entering the NOPAC Route System within Anchorage
Centers FIR boundary should contact ARINC on VHF 129.4 to obtain primary/secondary HF frequencies and verify SELCAL
before entering NOPAC. If unable 129.4, primary/secondary HF frequencies may be obtained from Anchorage ARTCC, but
no SELCAL is available.
CENTRAL WEST PACIFIC (CWP) NETWORK FREQUENCIES
San Francisco
MWARA — 2998, 3455, 4666, 5652, 6532, 8903, 11384, 13300, 17904 and 21985 kHz
LDOCF (c) — 3, 6640, 11342, 13348, 17925, and 21964 kHz
NORTH PACIFIC (NP) NETWORK FREQUENCIES
San Francisco
MWARA — 2932, 5628, 5667, 6655, 8951, 10048, 11330, 13273, 13339, 17946 and 21925 kHz
LDOCF (c) — 3, 6640, 11342, 13348, 17925, and 21964 kHz
CENTRAL EAST PACIFIC NETWORK FREQUENCIES
San Francisco
Extended Range VHF (a) — 131.95
MWARA — 2869, 3413, 3452, 5547, 5574, 6673, 8843, 8915, 10057, 11282, 13288, 13354, and 21964 kHz
LDOCF (c) — 3, 6640, 11342, 13348, 17925, and 21964 kHz
Seattle
Pre-flight checks (b)— 5574 kHz
SOUTH PACIFIC (SP) NETWORK FREQUENCIES
San Francisco
MWARA — 3467, 5643, 8867, 13261, and 17904 kHz
LDOCF (c) — 3, 6640, 11342, 13348, 17925, and 21964 kHz
SSB capability available on all HF freqs. (a) Extended Range VHF. Coverage includes area within approximately 200 NM of
the Hawaiian Islands and along the Hawaii–Mainland US tracks extending outward approximately 250 NM from the HNL,
SFO, and LAX areas. (b) Call ARINC on 129.85 VHF to arrange HF checks. 129.40 available for enroute communications on
SEA—ANC routes. _(c) Users are reminded that all transmissions on the ARINC HF SSB LDOCF must be in the single
sideband mode (upper sideband only). Phone patch service will be available as a normal part of the service.
Communications are limited to aircraft operational control matters. Public correspondence (personal messages) to/from
crew or passengers cannot be accepted. Refer questions to ARINC operations at 1–800–621–0140.
Aircraft operating in the Anchorage Arctic CTA/FIR beyond line of sight range of remote control VHF air/ground facilities
operated from the Anchorage ARTCC, shall maintain communications with Gander Radio and a listening or SELCAL watch
on HF frequencies of the North Atlantic D (NAT D) network (2971 kHz, 4675 kHz, 8891 kHz and 11279 kHz). Additionally,
and in view of reported marginal reception of the Honolulu Pacific VOLMET broadcasts in that and adjacent Canadian
airspace, Gander Radio can provide Anchorage and Fairbanks surface observations and terminal forecasts to flight crews
on request.
SATCOM
 
D

DaveNF2G

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A moderator should correct the spelling of ARINC in the thread heading so it will come up on searches.
 

kma371

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I think This should be in the wiki anyway

A source link would be helpful too.
 

lotsofradios

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At least he posted some useful information. I look at it as a great reminder that ARINC is something to listen to. The more we complain about people who post information, the less information that will be posted, then we all loose....
 

HopperD

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Thanks for the post BMT. Although I have most of these, it's nice to know that I'm not the only one listening to AIRINC, which I do quite often.

I'm located in West LA, CA, and on occasion I'm able to pick up Tokyo, sometimes it comes in very clear, sometimes not so much. The times I've been able to pick up Tokyo is from dusk to dawn.

Also, if I'm listening at the right time, I'll pick up inflight medical emergencies. The last one I heard was about a week ago.
 

kma371

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At least he posted some useful information. I look at it as a great reminder that ARINC is something to listen to. The more we complain about people who post information, the less information that will be posted, then we all loose....
Who's complaining ?

We are just asking where he got his information, or at least I was.
 

scanmanmi

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Not exactly sure what AIRINC is. I hear a plane in central Michigan on 129.4 talking to someone about something that wasn't working and then he said the switch worked and the ground crew must have forgotten something. He then tried autopilot and said he wouldn't write anything up.
 

dlwtrunked

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AERONAUTICAL RADIO, INC (ARINC)
(Services available for aircraft engaged in international flight)
ARINC using Pacific common air/ground ATC frequency networks shared with other ground stations are listed below. The
...
airspace, Gander Radio can provide Anchorage and Fairbanks surface observations and terminal forecasts to flight crews
on request.
SATCOM
A link to the page with the maps is
https://www.rockwellcollins.com/Products-and-Services/Commercial-Aviation/Connectivity-and-Network-Services/Flight-deck-solutions/ARINC-Voice-Service.aspx
 

majoco

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I'm sure there is a lot of confusion about what ARINC is. As far as I understand it is a company that provides equipment and staff so that the FAA controllers can carry out their Air Traffic Control duties. ARINC also provides ground equipment for airline crews to contact their maintenance and operational bases. The frequencies involved for ATC are allocated by the FCC and co-ordinated through ICAO and the ITU, The LDOC frequencies are purely a continental US scheme with frequencies allocated by the FCC.

For info but a bit off-topic......For years ARINC has been the de facto organisation that makes standards for electronic equipment on aircraft right down to sizes, weights and connectors so that you can remove a Rockwell/Collins transceiver and fit a King model in it's place - always assuming that it is an approved modification by the FAA and mentioned in the aircraft engineering certification - plenty of traps in there for young players! Anything you do on an aircraft has to be done in accordance with the approved manuals, documented in the aircraft maintenance log books and in the records on the aircraft - signed off by the person that did the work and by the licenced engineer who certified that it was done in accordance with blah blah blah . The maintenance logs DO NOT go on the aircraft - if the aircraft crashes and goes up in flames who's to know who did what with what and why..... :)
 
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