Are You Promoting our Hobby in the Best Possible Way

iMONITOR

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Thanks for all the replies, I didn't want to offend anybody but the below post really touches on my point.

The issue / difference is that those other services are not crying out for new members, hams on the other hand are but don't seem to understand that often they are driving people away, not encouraging them in.
I wasn't offended pb_lonny, I was a little puzzled by your post initially. It's in the "General Scanning Discussion" forum and I've never known the scanning hobby to be so serious or influential and never thought of scanner listeners as being critiqued by anyone in such a manner. I saw some humor in it and thought I'd play along.

Amateur radio is a totally different culture and over the years I've definitely observed the need for improvement in more ways than I can count.
 

ILjim

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What are you doing to promote your hobby? Forget about yourself for a second and consider if what you are doing is helping or hindering others who share the same hobby as you?

- Physical Appearance:
This might vary for some hobbies that have safety requirements or require wearing specific clothing. When undertaking your hobby, are you presentable in your clothing and appearance? While I am not suggesting for one second that you should go out in a three-piece suit, is your clothing neat and tidy? Are you presenting yourself as somebody you would want to talk to? Nobody wants to talk to somebody who looks “rough”.
I tend to wear boring and drab colored shirts and polos without logos or artwork. Jeans are my preferred trousers.
- Attitude:
If somebody came up and spoke to you, would you welcome this interaction and provide them information on your hobby and answer any questions? Do you look for opportunities to both promote your hobby and demonstrate it in a positive light to anybody who shows an interest? Do you avoid the well-known “old boys club” attitude which is so very clear in a lot of radio clubs?
I am more than happy to answer questions that people have, and I do my best to show how great the hobby is.
- Language:
Do you speak in a tone and manner which is welcoming, and do you reframe from swearing, especially around children? If you are asked questions, can you answer them in a manner which would encourage more people to join into your hobby or would you be seen as pushing people away?
I hardly ever swear, and I especially don't in public and around children. Like I said earlier, I talk about how great the hobby is.
- Equipment:
Is your equipment stored and used in such a way as to not be a risk to others? Is it well kept and not dangerous? Do you consider other people when setting up in public spaces?
When not in use, I carry my scanners in an insulated lunch bag (yeah, I'm cheap). When I carry my radio out in the field, I use my swivel belt clip and I always use earphones when listening.
- Online presence:
If you have an online presence (website, blog, Facebook page), is it regularly updated and used to promote your hobby as something other people might like to be a part of?
Even though I'm only 21, I don't do SurveillanceBoo...ahem Facebook or Twitter. I have a YouTube channel, but I don't upload much there.
 

pb_lonny

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I've never known the scanning hobby to be so serious or influential and never thought of scanner listeners as being critiqued by anyone in such a manner. I saw some humor in it and thought I'd play along.
Sadly here it is, I have been questioned, called a spy, accused of being a terrorist and all sorts of things...
 

dlwtrunked

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It's not what you look like, what you're dressed like or anything like that. It's your attitude and your skills that will impress the newcomer/visitor.
...
You can't judge a book by it's cover.
Many people do judge the book by the cover and will never get past the cover to get to attitude and skills. I know many young people who dropped out after the first meeting after seeing "the cover". It is wishful thinking that they will get past the cover to see good attitude and skills in many cases. But this thread has become a mix of scanner listening response and amateur radio responses. For scanner listening, how you dress etc. is not really an issue but for amateur radio it is. I know of a case where a local government dropped contact with amateur radio due to the outer cover of the person it met with. I might have done the same. One would not likely want such a person being present at events as part of the support activity. I personally hate dress codes (I am 67 and go out to get the mail with no shirt, short pants, and bare feet), but when doing such support in amateur radio, it almost seems like their should be one--perhaps casual business attire except when the activity is not friendly to such. Yes, I know some will rebel.
 

KK4JUG

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We have to remember that the OP lives in Tasmania. For those who don't know, that's a part of Australia. Most of the respondents in this thread are in the United States. While there are many similarities between the locations, there are decided differences in attitude, temperament, etc. What may be the norm in Hometown, USA, may be completely different in Tasmania. I would have a devil of a time admitting one is better than the other.
 

trentbob

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Interesting thread and although we're joking around, very well intended. There is definitely a difference culturally between Australia and United States. Don't know exactly what that means but... people here are barely aware of the fact there is a scanning hobby per se. Many people don't even know what amateur operators are.

Even though it's changed a lot by tradition ham operators serve a purpose and can be called on in Regional and National emergencies to assist. Obviously this role has changed over the years.

People dress casually everywhere now. If I go to a hamfest everybody is pretty much dressed comfortably but I've never had a case where someone had strong body odor or dirty hair. In general and universally a pretty good crowd.

As far as scanner hobbyist I don't even see it as an organized group of people to even be well represented in the United States.
 

TailGator911

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My wife says we are a cult - addicted to technology, obsessed with new gadgets, possessed by old gadgets, proud owners of an FCC license and keepers of the Empire of Wires (beneath our radio desks). She says she thinks we're pretty cool people lol.
 

Citywide173

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What are you doing to promote your hobby? Forget about yourself for a second and consider if what you are doing is helping or hindering others who share the same hobby as you?
- Physical Appearance:
Always presentable, usually with a department T-shirt, jeans, work boots and a job shirt or station chore jacket in the colder months.

- Attitude:
I try to field any questions that anyone asks. Usually it's "who do you shoot for?" and I tell them that my photos are generally for the trade magazines to assist with training. If they have questions about the radio traffic, I explain what's coming out of the radio. If asked about the tactics being used on scene I try to explain it in the simplest terms possible without being belittling or condescending. The scene is usually hectic and being able to take on some of these questions that might be directed at a person who is trying to perform their job at that moment if I wasn't there is something that I consider a service to those who are busy.

- Language:
I hope that I don't put anyone off with my answers or attitude.

- Equipment:
Scanning is how I know-it's a support device, rarely do I have more than my G5 on my person when in public view. My 2 DSLRs with an attached GoPro for live streaming are always in a state of readiness on scene.

- Online presence:
You can decide for yourself Firepics-THE place for fire photographers
 

KK4JUG

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Back in the early 70s, I was a reporter for the local CBS TV station. On weekends, I anchored the newscasts. I was always wearing a nice coat, tie and.....shorts and sneakers. You couldn't see behind the news desk. Later, I worked as public information officer with the police department. Knowing how slow news could be on weekends, I would frequently get requests from one of the four TV station for an interview. They wanted somebody--anybody--to supplement the anchor. They wanted another talking head. I acquiesced with the proviso that they would only do medium shots and no long shots because in the summertime, I was wearing a nice open-collared shirt and, you guessed it, shorts and sneakers.
 

spacellamaman

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Back in the early 70s, I was a reporter for the local CBS TV station. On weekends, I anchored the newscasts. I was always wearing a nice coat, tie and.....shorts and sneakers. You couldn't see behind the news desk. Later, I worked as public information officer with the police department. Knowing how slow news could be on weekends, I would frequently get requests from one of the four TV station for an interview. They wanted somebody--anybody--to supplement the anchor. They wanted another talking head. I acquiesced with the proviso that they would only do medium shots and no long shots because in the summertime, I was wearing a nice open-collared shirt and, you guessed it, shorts and sneakers.
its a good thing i wasn't the cameraman :)

BREAKING NEWS!!!

Pants-less Police Pontificate!!!

News @ 11!!!!
 

trentbob

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Back in the early 70s, I was a reporter for the local CBS TV station. On weekends, I anchored the newscasts. I was always wearing a nice coat, tie and.....shorts and sneakers. You couldn't see behind the news desk. Later, I worked as public information officer with the police department. Knowing how slow news could be on weekends, I would frequently get requests from one of the four TV station for an interview. They wanted somebody--anybody--to supplement the anchor. They wanted another talking head. I acquiesced with the proviso that they would only do medium shots and no long shots because in the summertime, I was wearing a nice open-collared shirt and, you guessed it, shorts and sneakers.
No ankle holster for you, sorry had to say it.
 
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